Emergency funding for Neighbour to Neighbour Centre food bank

Community Apr 01, 2020 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Neighbour to Neighbour Centre is getting a big boost from Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) and the Hamilton Community Foundation.

CFCC has committed $100,000 to the Athens Street food bank, as part of their emergency funding for food centres during the coronavirus pandemic, while the foundation has given the food bank $20,000.

“We are thrilled to receive it,” said centre executive director Denise Arkell. “It will be used for the purchase of food and food operations.”

Foundation CEO Terry Cooke noted they are a longtime supporter of Neighbour to Neighbour.

“We have high regard for the quality of service they provide and the impact they deliver,” Cooke said.

He noted the foundation’s board recently agreed to take $2 million from their reserves and set up the Pandemic Response Fund to support local charities and organizations that are offering coronavirus-related relief.

Neighbour to Neighbour was part of the first $300,000 that was spent, and Cooke said he expects the rest will be handed out over the next three to six months.

“This is a storm,” said Cooke, who also noted the foundation recently received more than $800,000 from local donors that will be added to the $2-million fund.

“That’s unprecedented,” Cooke said. “To see that kind of community response is powerful and moving.”

Arkell added that Sheila and Jim Drury, owners of The Keg on Upper James, recently donated 295 kilograms of fresh produce to the food bank.

Krista D’Aoust, director of community and food bank services at Neighbour to Neighbour, said the gifts will also help them get more food out into the community.

“We’re getting more and more calls for deliveries by people who are self-isolating or having to quarantine themselves or have other health issues,” D’Aoust said.

She noted the centre is delivering food to as many as 65 clients each month.

In addition, city staff are delivering food to as many as six Neighbour to Neighbour clients two or three days a week.

Meanwhile, centre staff continue to work in two teams of eight or nine in the food bank on alternate weeks. D’Aoust said they are wearing gloves and practicing physical distancing.

Last month the centre sent all volunteers home, cancelled most programs and is now serving in-person food bank clients in the reception area just inside the north side door.

During busy periods, usually between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., clients with vehicles are being served in the parking lot by the south side entrance.

Food bank hours are Monday to Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. (they take a break from 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m.), and Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. (they take a break from 3:15 p.m. to 4 p.m.).

Instead of food donations, Neighbour to Neighbour is asking the public to make monetary donations online at n2ncentre.com.

D’Aoust said each team is doing the work that would normally be done each week by 100-200 volunteers in the food bank.

“It’s overwhelming,” she said.

Emergency funding coming for Neighbour to Neighbour Centre food bank to deal with coronavirus crunch

Athens Street centre getting support from CFCC and Hamilton Community Foundation

Community Apr 01, 2020 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Neighbour to Neighbour Centre is getting a big boost from Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) and the Hamilton Community Foundation.

CFCC has committed $100,000 to the Athens Street food bank, as part of their emergency funding for food centres during the coronavirus pandemic, while the foundation has given the food bank $20,000.

“We are thrilled to receive it,” said centre executive director Denise Arkell. “It will be used for the purchase of food and food operations.”

Foundation CEO Terry Cooke noted they are a longtime supporter of Neighbour to Neighbour.

Related Content

“We have high regard for the quality of service they provide and the impact they deliver,” Cooke said.

He noted the foundation’s board recently agreed to take $2 million from their reserves and set up the Pandemic Response Fund to support local charities and organizations that are offering coronavirus-related relief.

Neighbour to Neighbour was part of the first $300,000 that was spent, and Cooke said he expects the rest will be handed out over the next three to six months.

“This is a storm,” said Cooke, who also noted the foundation recently received more than $800,000 from local donors that will be added to the $2-million fund.

“That’s unprecedented,” Cooke said. “To see that kind of community response is powerful and moving.”

Arkell added that Sheila and Jim Drury, owners of The Keg on Upper James, recently donated 295 kilograms of fresh produce to the food bank.

Krista D’Aoust, director of community and food bank services at Neighbour to Neighbour, said the gifts will also help them get more food out into the community.

“We’re getting more and more calls for deliveries by people who are self-isolating or having to quarantine themselves or have other health issues,” D’Aoust said.

She noted the centre is delivering food to as many as 65 clients each month.

In addition, city staff are delivering food to as many as six Neighbour to Neighbour clients two or three days a week.

Meanwhile, centre staff continue to work in two teams of eight or nine in the food bank on alternate weeks. D’Aoust said they are wearing gloves and practicing physical distancing.

Last month the centre sent all volunteers home, cancelled most programs and is now serving in-person food bank clients in the reception area just inside the north side door.

During busy periods, usually between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., clients with vehicles are being served in the parking lot by the south side entrance.

Food bank hours are Monday to Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. (they take a break from 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m.), and Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. (they take a break from 3:15 p.m. to 4 p.m.).

Instead of food donations, Neighbour to Neighbour is asking the public to make monetary donations online at n2ncentre.com.

D’Aoust said each team is doing the work that would normally be done each week by 100-200 volunteers in the food bank.

“It’s overwhelming,” she said.

Emergency funding coming for Neighbour to Neighbour Centre food bank to deal with coronavirus crunch

Athens Street centre getting support from CFCC and Hamilton Community Foundation

Community Apr 01, 2020 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Neighbour to Neighbour Centre is getting a big boost from Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) and the Hamilton Community Foundation.

CFCC has committed $100,000 to the Athens Street food bank, as part of their emergency funding for food centres during the coronavirus pandemic, while the foundation has given the food bank $20,000.

“We are thrilled to receive it,” said centre executive director Denise Arkell. “It will be used for the purchase of food and food operations.”

Foundation CEO Terry Cooke noted they are a longtime supporter of Neighbour to Neighbour.

Related Content

“We have high regard for the quality of service they provide and the impact they deliver,” Cooke said.

He noted the foundation’s board recently agreed to take $2 million from their reserves and set up the Pandemic Response Fund to support local charities and organizations that are offering coronavirus-related relief.

Neighbour to Neighbour was part of the first $300,000 that was spent, and Cooke said he expects the rest will be handed out over the next three to six months.

“This is a storm,” said Cooke, who also noted the foundation recently received more than $800,000 from local donors that will be added to the $2-million fund.

“That’s unprecedented,” Cooke said. “To see that kind of community response is powerful and moving.”

Arkell added that Sheila and Jim Drury, owners of The Keg on Upper James, recently donated 295 kilograms of fresh produce to the food bank.

Krista D’Aoust, director of community and food bank services at Neighbour to Neighbour, said the gifts will also help them get more food out into the community.

“We’re getting more and more calls for deliveries by people who are self-isolating or having to quarantine themselves or have other health issues,” D’Aoust said.

She noted the centre is delivering food to as many as 65 clients each month.

In addition, city staff are delivering food to as many as six Neighbour to Neighbour clients two or three days a week.

Meanwhile, centre staff continue to work in two teams of eight or nine in the food bank on alternate weeks. D’Aoust said they are wearing gloves and practicing physical distancing.

Last month the centre sent all volunteers home, cancelled most programs and is now serving in-person food bank clients in the reception area just inside the north side door.

During busy periods, usually between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., clients with vehicles are being served in the parking lot by the south side entrance.

Food bank hours are Monday to Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. (they take a break from 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m.), and Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. (they take a break from 3:15 p.m. to 4 p.m.).

Instead of food donations, Neighbour to Neighbour is asking the public to make monetary donations online at n2ncentre.com.

D’Aoust said each team is doing the work that would normally be done each week by 100-200 volunteers in the food bank.

“It’s overwhelming,” she said.