Ideas work at Mohawk College

Community Dec 06, 2018 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Last month Hamilton Community News reported that Mohawk College led Canada’s community colleges last year in attracting private sector research dollars.

This article looks at an example of those dollars in action.

Construction companies that use an updated Batt Pack Energy unit rather than a gas-powered generator to run their tools will be employing some technology developed by Mohawk College student Grant Wingfield.

The 21-year-old third year mechanical engineering student from Burlington spent the summer helping Hybrid Power Solutions (HPS) of Mississauga improve their 100 pound power boxes that are preferred by businesses such as mining companies and transit authorities that require a quiet and emission-free source of direct current electricity.

“I helped them design the overall casing for the battery packs,” said Wingfield who is one of the students in Ideaworks, a research and innovation hub located in the engineering wing at the Fennell campus.

He also designed the largest plug on the unit along with the gauge and the off/on switch and used the three dimensional printer at Ideaworks to make a case for one of the pack’s internal components.

Wingfield said his job included assembling the units at the Mississauga plant plus and design work using SolidWorks, a computer aided design (CAD) and engineering program, at Mohawk.

“It was a good learning experience,” said Wingfield who is looking to do more work in the field of 3-D printing.

HPS project director Francois Byrne said Wingfield and the three other Mohawk students they hired previously have been worth the investment.

“You get a student that is of high quality that is hard-working,” he said. “A fresh face, mind and a fresh look at things.”

Byrne figures the company has spent about $10,000 on research and development work at Mohawk since connecting with the college two years ago.

He noted their battery packs are used in every large mine in Canada along with the Toronto Transit Commission and they are also exporting the units to the United States.

He said “the door is open” if Wingfield should come there looking for full-time employment after he graduates.

Natalie Shearer, manager of industry and community engagement at Mohawk, said the college hooks up with HPS and other businesses through its participation in the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation, a consortium of college and universities that supply research and development services to industry.

“What really differentiates us is the applied nature to problems that industry is facing right now,” she said. “We are looking at what do you need right now to drive your business and how can the college’s assets support that? It’s a quick and economical way for them to go about their R and D.”

In 2017, Mohawk led all community colleges in Canada with 94 private-sector projects and $2.7 million worth of private-sector funding.

With 800 students enrolled in programs that are directly or indirectly doing industry funded work, the college expects to top the $3 million mark this year and continue to grow in the years to come.

 

Ideas work at Mohawk College

Students help businesses with research and development

Community Dec 06, 2018 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Last month Hamilton Community News reported that Mohawk College led Canada’s community colleges last year in attracting private sector research dollars.

This article looks at an example of those dollars in action.

Construction companies that use an updated Batt Pack Energy unit rather than a gas-powered generator to run their tools will be employing some technology developed by Mohawk College student Grant Wingfield.

The 21-year-old third year mechanical engineering student from Burlington spent the summer helping Hybrid Power Solutions (HPS) of Mississauga improve their 100 pound power boxes that are preferred by businesses such as mining companies and transit authorities that require a quiet and emission-free source of direct current electricity.

“I helped them design the overall casing for the battery packs,” said Wingfield who is one of the students in Ideaworks, a research and innovation hub located in the engineering wing at the Fennell campus.

He also designed the largest plug on the unit along with the gauge and the off/on switch and used the three dimensional printer at Ideaworks to make a case for one of the pack’s internal components.

Wingfield said his job included assembling the units at the Mississauga plant plus and design work using SolidWorks, a computer aided design (CAD) and engineering program, at Mohawk.

“It was a good learning experience,” said Wingfield who is looking to do more work in the field of 3-D printing.

HPS project director Francois Byrne said Wingfield and the three other Mohawk students they hired previously have been worth the investment.

“You get a student that is of high quality that is hard-working,” he said. “A fresh face, mind and a fresh look at things.”

Byrne figures the company has spent about $10,000 on research and development work at Mohawk since connecting with the college two years ago.

He noted their battery packs are used in every large mine in Canada along with the Toronto Transit Commission and they are also exporting the units to the United States.

He said “the door is open” if Wingfield should come there looking for full-time employment after he graduates.

Natalie Shearer, manager of industry and community engagement at Mohawk, said the college hooks up with HPS and other businesses through its participation in the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation, a consortium of college and universities that supply research and development services to industry.

“What really differentiates us is the applied nature to problems that industry is facing right now,” she said. “We are looking at what do you need right now to drive your business and how can the college’s assets support that? It’s a quick and economical way for them to go about their R and D.”

In 2017, Mohawk led all community colleges in Canada with 94 private-sector projects and $2.7 million worth of private-sector funding.

With 800 students enrolled in programs that are directly or indirectly doing industry funded work, the college expects to top the $3 million mark this year and continue to grow in the years to come.

 

Ideas work at Mohawk College

Students help businesses with research and development

Community Dec 06, 2018 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Last month Hamilton Community News reported that Mohawk College led Canada’s community colleges last year in attracting private sector research dollars.

This article looks at an example of those dollars in action.

Construction companies that use an updated Batt Pack Energy unit rather than a gas-powered generator to run their tools will be employing some technology developed by Mohawk College student Grant Wingfield.

The 21-year-old third year mechanical engineering student from Burlington spent the summer helping Hybrid Power Solutions (HPS) of Mississauga improve their 100 pound power boxes that are preferred by businesses such as mining companies and transit authorities that require a quiet and emission-free source of direct current electricity.

“I helped them design the overall casing for the battery packs,” said Wingfield who is one of the students in Ideaworks, a research and innovation hub located in the engineering wing at the Fennell campus.

He also designed the largest plug on the unit along with the gauge and the off/on switch and used the three dimensional printer at Ideaworks to make a case for one of the pack’s internal components.

Wingfield said his job included assembling the units at the Mississauga plant plus and design work using SolidWorks, a computer aided design (CAD) and engineering program, at Mohawk.

“It was a good learning experience,” said Wingfield who is looking to do more work in the field of 3-D printing.

HPS project director Francois Byrne said Wingfield and the three other Mohawk students they hired previously have been worth the investment.

“You get a student that is of high quality that is hard-working,” he said. “A fresh face, mind and a fresh look at things.”

Byrne figures the company has spent about $10,000 on research and development work at Mohawk since connecting with the college two years ago.

He noted their battery packs are used in every large mine in Canada along with the Toronto Transit Commission and they are also exporting the units to the United States.

He said “the door is open” if Wingfield should come there looking for full-time employment after he graduates.

Natalie Shearer, manager of industry and community engagement at Mohawk, said the college hooks up with HPS and other businesses through its participation in the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation, a consortium of college and universities that supply research and development services to industry.

“What really differentiates us is the applied nature to problems that industry is facing right now,” she said. “We are looking at what do you need right now to drive your business and how can the college’s assets support that? It’s a quick and economical way for them to go about their R and D.”

In 2017, Mohawk led all community colleges in Canada with 94 private-sector projects and $2.7 million worth of private-sector funding.

With 800 students enrolled in programs that are directly or indirectly doing industry funded work, the college expects to top the $3 million mark this year and continue to grow in the years to come.