Taro dump licence left out ‘pre-existing waste’

Community Feb 14, 2018 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The province’s verdict is in on whether the Taro industrial dump is full, and it contains a surprise: the site’s approved capacity should have been higher to reflect 180,500 cubic metres of waste piled there before it got its licence.

The revelation is contained in a Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change memo responding to upper Stoney Creek resident Wes Connor’s contention the site has already exceeded its capacity.

Dale Gable, supervisor of the environmental assessment and permissions branch’s waste unit, states the quarry had the 180,500 cubic metres of “pre-existing waste” — or about 360,000 tonnes — when the Mike Harris government approved the dump in 1996.

He recommends the company apply to amend the site’s licence to add the pre-existing waste to the current capacity of 6.32 million cubic metres.

Gable also accepts Terrapure’s assumption it can get extra waste capacity — an estimated 127,600 cubic metres — by removing the dump’s roads and ramps.

His Jan. 26 memo states Connor didn’t account for those two factors as well as the potential settlement of waste over time, and that “there are areas where waste has been piled and has not been placed and compacted.”

These “differences and factors” help explain disagreement over the site’s remaining capacity, Gable states.

Terrapure estimated Taro still had room for 532,585 cubic metres of waste at the beginning of last year, while Connor put the figure at 210,820 based on the company’s own annual compliance report for the site.

Compliance reports over the years have consistently estimated the dump receives 250,000 cubic metres of waste annually, enough to make it full by Connor’s math if the average held true for 2017.

Gable’s memo doesn’t address how much waste the site took in last year and the company has told the Stoney Creek News it won’t disclose the figure until the next compliance report, due at the end of June.

The memo comes as the company is in the early stages of an environmental assessment on a variety of expansion options that could increase Taro’s waste capacity by between 20 and nearly 60 per cent.

Connor said it’s the first time he’s heard the site had pre-existing waste and he believes the ministry memo essentially backs his view that it “doesn’t have any capacity left,” barring the removal of aggregate used for roads and ramps.

“I think it’s as clear as the nose on your face now,” he said. “It should be shut down now.”

Terrapure communications director Greg Jones said the company is pleased the ministry has confirmed its 2016 estimate on the remaining site life was accurate.

He said the ministry gave former owner Philip Services Corp. permission to keep the pre-existing waste on site when the dump was licensed, but made an error in not including it in the approved volume.

Jones said the site’s design always took the additional waste into account so it won’t affect final approved contours, and Terrapure will remove the ramps and roads.

“It’s space that we can otherwise use for waste, and it’s in our best interest to do so,” he said.

Ministry spokesperson Lindsay Davidson said staff was scheduled to meet with the company on Feb. 13 to discuss the recommended amendment to its environmental compliance approval, or licence.

“If Terrapure chooses to submit an application to amend its ECA, the company will be required to abide by the conditions set out by the ministry,” said Davidson.

Taro dump licence left out ‘pre-existing waste’

Resident says ministry response doesn’t change capacity doubts

Community Feb 14, 2018 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The province’s verdict is in on whether the Taro industrial dump is full, and it contains a surprise: the site’s approved capacity should have been higher to reflect 180,500 cubic metres of waste piled there before it got its licence.

The revelation is contained in a Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change memo responding to upper Stoney Creek resident Wes Connor’s contention the site has already exceeded its capacity.

Dale Gable, supervisor of the environmental assessment and permissions branch’s waste unit, states the quarry had the 180,500 cubic metres of “pre-existing waste” — or about 360,000 tonnes — when the Mike Harris government approved the dump in 1996.

He recommends the company apply to amend the site’s licence to add the pre-existing waste to the current capacity of 6.32 million cubic metres.

It should be shut down now. — Wes Connor

Gable also accepts Terrapure’s assumption it can get extra waste capacity — an estimated 127,600 cubic metres — by removing the dump’s roads and ramps.

His Jan. 26 memo states Connor didn’t account for those two factors as well as the potential settlement of waste over time, and that “there are areas where waste has been piled and has not been placed and compacted.”

These “differences and factors” help explain disagreement over the site’s remaining capacity, Gable states.

Terrapure estimated Taro still had room for 532,585 cubic metres of waste at the beginning of last year, while Connor put the figure at 210,820 based on the company’s own annual compliance report for the site.

Compliance reports over the years have consistently estimated the dump receives 250,000 cubic metres of waste annually, enough to make it full by Connor’s math if the average held true for 2017.

Gable’s memo doesn’t address how much waste the site took in last year and the company has told the Stoney Creek News it won’t disclose the figure until the next compliance report, due at the end of June.

The memo comes as the company is in the early stages of an environmental assessment on a variety of expansion options that could increase Taro’s waste capacity by between 20 and nearly 60 per cent.

Connor said it’s the first time he’s heard the site had pre-existing waste and he believes the ministry memo essentially backs his view that it “doesn’t have any capacity left,” barring the removal of aggregate used for roads and ramps.

“I think it’s as clear as the nose on your face now,” he said. “It should be shut down now.”

Terrapure communications director Greg Jones said the company is pleased the ministry has confirmed its 2016 estimate on the remaining site life was accurate.

He said the ministry gave former owner Philip Services Corp. permission to keep the pre-existing waste on site when the dump was licensed, but made an error in not including it in the approved volume.

Jones said the site’s design always took the additional waste into account so it won’t affect final approved contours, and Terrapure will remove the ramps and roads.

“It’s space that we can otherwise use for waste, and it’s in our best interest to do so,” he said.

Ministry spokesperson Lindsay Davidson said staff was scheduled to meet with the company on Feb. 13 to discuss the recommended amendment to its environmental compliance approval, or licence.

“If Terrapure chooses to submit an application to amend its ECA, the company will be required to abide by the conditions set out by the ministry,” said Davidson.

Taro dump licence left out ‘pre-existing waste’

Resident says ministry response doesn’t change capacity doubts

Community Feb 14, 2018 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The province’s verdict is in on whether the Taro industrial dump is full, and it contains a surprise: the site’s approved capacity should have been higher to reflect 180,500 cubic metres of waste piled there before it got its licence.

The revelation is contained in a Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change memo responding to upper Stoney Creek resident Wes Connor’s contention the site has already exceeded its capacity.

Dale Gable, supervisor of the environmental assessment and permissions branch’s waste unit, states the quarry had the 180,500 cubic metres of “pre-existing waste” — or about 360,000 tonnes — when the Mike Harris government approved the dump in 1996.

He recommends the company apply to amend the site’s licence to add the pre-existing waste to the current capacity of 6.32 million cubic metres.

It should be shut down now. — Wes Connor

Gable also accepts Terrapure’s assumption it can get extra waste capacity — an estimated 127,600 cubic metres — by removing the dump’s roads and ramps.

His Jan. 26 memo states Connor didn’t account for those two factors as well as the potential settlement of waste over time, and that “there are areas where waste has been piled and has not been placed and compacted.”

These “differences and factors” help explain disagreement over the site’s remaining capacity, Gable states.

Terrapure estimated Taro still had room for 532,585 cubic metres of waste at the beginning of last year, while Connor put the figure at 210,820 based on the company’s own annual compliance report for the site.

Compliance reports over the years have consistently estimated the dump receives 250,000 cubic metres of waste annually, enough to make it full by Connor’s math if the average held true for 2017.

Gable’s memo doesn’t address how much waste the site took in last year and the company has told the Stoney Creek News it won’t disclose the figure until the next compliance report, due at the end of June.

The memo comes as the company is in the early stages of an environmental assessment on a variety of expansion options that could increase Taro’s waste capacity by between 20 and nearly 60 per cent.

Connor said it’s the first time he’s heard the site had pre-existing waste and he believes the ministry memo essentially backs his view that it “doesn’t have any capacity left,” barring the removal of aggregate used for roads and ramps.

“I think it’s as clear as the nose on your face now,” he said. “It should be shut down now.”

Terrapure communications director Greg Jones said the company is pleased the ministry has confirmed its 2016 estimate on the remaining site life was accurate.

He said the ministry gave former owner Philip Services Corp. permission to keep the pre-existing waste on site when the dump was licensed, but made an error in not including it in the approved volume.

Jones said the site’s design always took the additional waste into account so it won’t affect final approved contours, and Terrapure will remove the ramps and roads.

“It’s space that we can otherwise use for waste, and it’s in our best interest to do so,” he said.

Ministry spokesperson Lindsay Davidson said staff was scheduled to meet with the company on Feb. 13 to discuss the recommended amendment to its environmental compliance approval, or licence.

“If Terrapure chooses to submit an application to amend its ECA, the company will be required to abide by the conditions set out by the ministry,” said Davidson.