Juravinski hospital offers new approach for stem cell transplants

Community Jan 03, 2018 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It’s an approach aimed at enabling more stem cell transplant patients to stay at home rather in the hospital.

Since last fall, the Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre (JHCC) has been treating autologous stem cell recipients who have had low doses of chemotherapy as outpatients.

“What we have found in large studies is that patients are doing better, they have better emotional well-being,” said Dr. Kylie Lepic, a hematologist at the Concession Street hospital.

Autologous patients have their stem cells taken from their blood prior to chemotherapy.

The cells are then frozen and injected back into the patient via a chest catheter following the treatment.

Those patients return to the hospital daily for reassessment, and any further treatments required.

“It’s quite a big change,” Lepic said. “These patients used to have to come in to the hospital and stay in the hospital for two or three weeks. Now they get to be back at home and it’s really driving home the idea of patient-centred care.”

Lepic said stem cell outpatients are reminded to frequently wash their hands and to avoid contact with anyone who is ill.

The new approach also frees up beds and enables the hospital to do more stem cell transplants.

Overall, the hospital sees 50-60 stem cell patients each day and was expected to perform 180 transplants during the fiscal 2017-18 period.

Allogeneic stem cell recipients (those receiving stem cells from a donor), who receive high doses of chemotherapy and have weakened immune systems, are still admitted to hospital where they stay in positive pressure, germ-free rooms during recovery.

Blood-forming stem cells grow into different types of blood cells and are used to help the body recover its ability to produce stem cells following high doses of chemo or radiation therapy. Stem cell transplants are used most often by people with leukemia and lymphoma.

The recovery period for stem cell patients is about 100 days.

Meanwhile, planning work continues for the new $18-million, 20,000-square-foot, 15-bed space for stem cell transplant patients on the fourth floor of the JHCC.

Tamara Pope, vice president of marketing and communications with the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation, said the planning phase has taken longer than expected and has pushed the project back by about six months.

Construction is now slated to begin in the spring and be completed by the fall of 2019.

The foundation has also raised its Tomorrow Stems From You campaign target from $3.5 million to $5 million, with the province providing the balance.

Public donations can be made via hamiltonhealth.ca/stems.

Currently, there are six specialized transplant patient beds within the 39-bed hematology unit at the hospital.

Juravinski hospital offers new approach for stem cell transplants

Most low chemo autologous recipients now being treated as outpatients

Community Jan 03, 2018 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It’s an approach aimed at enabling more stem cell transplant patients to stay at home rather in the hospital.

Since last fall, the Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre (JHCC) has been treating autologous stem cell recipients who have had low doses of chemotherapy as outpatients.

“What we have found in large studies is that patients are doing better, they have better emotional well-being,” said Dr. Kylie Lepic, a hematologist at the Concession Street hospital.

Autologous patients have their stem cells taken from their blood prior to chemotherapy.

The cells are then frozen and injected back into the patient via a chest catheter following the treatment.

Those patients return to the hospital daily for reassessment, and any further treatments required.

“It’s quite a big change,” Lepic said. “These patients used to have to come in to the hospital and stay in the hospital for two or three weeks. Now they get to be back at home and it’s really driving home the idea of patient-centred care.”

Lepic said stem cell outpatients are reminded to frequently wash their hands and to avoid contact with anyone who is ill.

The new approach also frees up beds and enables the hospital to do more stem cell transplants.

Overall, the hospital sees 50-60 stem cell patients each day and was expected to perform 180 transplants during the fiscal 2017-18 period.

Allogeneic stem cell recipients (those receiving stem cells from a donor), who receive high doses of chemotherapy and have weakened immune systems, are still admitted to hospital where they stay in positive pressure, germ-free rooms during recovery.

Blood-forming stem cells grow into different types of blood cells and are used to help the body recover its ability to produce stem cells following high doses of chemo or radiation therapy. Stem cell transplants are used most often by people with leukemia and lymphoma.

The recovery period for stem cell patients is about 100 days.

Meanwhile, planning work continues for the new $18-million, 20,000-square-foot, 15-bed space for stem cell transplant patients on the fourth floor of the JHCC.

Tamara Pope, vice president of marketing and communications with the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation, said the planning phase has taken longer than expected and has pushed the project back by about six months.

Construction is now slated to begin in the spring and be completed by the fall of 2019.

The foundation has also raised its Tomorrow Stems From You campaign target from $3.5 million to $5 million, with the province providing the balance.

Public donations can be made via hamiltonhealth.ca/stems.

Currently, there are six specialized transplant patient beds within the 39-bed hematology unit at the hospital.

Juravinski hospital offers new approach for stem cell transplants

Most low chemo autologous recipients now being treated as outpatients

Community Jan 03, 2018 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It’s an approach aimed at enabling more stem cell transplant patients to stay at home rather in the hospital.

Since last fall, the Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre (JHCC) has been treating autologous stem cell recipients who have had low doses of chemotherapy as outpatients.

“What we have found in large studies is that patients are doing better, they have better emotional well-being,” said Dr. Kylie Lepic, a hematologist at the Concession Street hospital.

Autologous patients have their stem cells taken from their blood prior to chemotherapy.

The cells are then frozen and injected back into the patient via a chest catheter following the treatment.

Those patients return to the hospital daily for reassessment, and any further treatments required.

“It’s quite a big change,” Lepic said. “These patients used to have to come in to the hospital and stay in the hospital for two or three weeks. Now they get to be back at home and it’s really driving home the idea of patient-centred care.”

Lepic said stem cell outpatients are reminded to frequently wash their hands and to avoid contact with anyone who is ill.

The new approach also frees up beds and enables the hospital to do more stem cell transplants.

Overall, the hospital sees 50-60 stem cell patients each day and was expected to perform 180 transplants during the fiscal 2017-18 period.

Allogeneic stem cell recipients (those receiving stem cells from a donor), who receive high doses of chemotherapy and have weakened immune systems, are still admitted to hospital where they stay in positive pressure, germ-free rooms during recovery.

Blood-forming stem cells grow into different types of blood cells and are used to help the body recover its ability to produce stem cells following high doses of chemo or radiation therapy. Stem cell transplants are used most often by people with leukemia and lymphoma.

The recovery period for stem cell patients is about 100 days.

Meanwhile, planning work continues for the new $18-million, 20,000-square-foot, 15-bed space for stem cell transplant patients on the fourth floor of the JHCC.

Tamara Pope, vice president of marketing and communications with the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation, said the planning phase has taken longer than expected and has pushed the project back by about six months.

Construction is now slated to begin in the spring and be completed by the fall of 2019.

The foundation has also raised its Tomorrow Stems From You campaign target from $3.5 million to $5 million, with the province providing the balance.

Public donations can be made via hamiltonhealth.ca/stems.

Currently, there are six specialized transplant patient beds within the 39-bed hematology unit at the hospital.