Mountain Legion sees jump in poppy donations

Community Dec 26, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Lucy Martin was beaming.

The chair of the poppy trust fund at Mount Hamilton Branch 163 of the Royal Canadian Legion says this year’s poppy campaign raised $64,323. 

That’s up from the $55,730 the Limeridge Road East Legion collected last year.

“I think it’s outstanding,” said Martin, who has been a longtime fixture at the Mountain branch. “It’s the volunteers that pull this together.”

That includes 60 volunteers who were on hand each day at Lime Ridge Mall from late October to Nov. 10 plus more than 75 donation boxes at locations across the Mountain.

“We got an awful lot of bills,” said Martin.

She said they collected $350 in $50 bills and a lot of appreciation.

“It isn’t anything for a Dutch person to come up and put in $50 and say to the veteran, ‘Thanks for my freedom.’ ”

Canadian soldiers liberated The Netherlands during the Second World War.

Martin said volunteers also collected $125 in U.S. coins and bills and $4 worth of Canadian Tire money.

She noted the move to $1 and $2 coins many years ago has helped bolster the donation boxes.

This year’s campaign helped push the Branch 163 poppy trust fund total to about $95,000.

Martin said the money will be used to help local veterans.

She figures they help 10-15 veterans each year. Most are Second World War vets.

Martin said she’s already looking at giving some money to help cover some dental work for one veteran, purchase a new mattress for another and supply a walker for another.

She encourages Canadian veterans who served in Afghanistan and elsewhere to visit the legion if they need help.

Martin said any veteran seeking assistance must show their discharge papers and provide information on which branch of the Canadian Forces they served with and where.

Any expenditure over $5,000 requires approval from the Dominion Command in Ottawa. Martin said in many of those cases, she will refer the vet to Veterans Affairs Canada.

Poppy trust fund money is also used for improvements to the legion building, such as electric doors and elevator maintenance, to make it easier for veterans to access.

Martin meticulously enters each trust fund deposit and expenditure by hand into the book ledger she has kept for many years.

The trust fund is audited each year.

At 89, Martin said she still enjoys overseeing the poppy trust fund and has no plans to give it up.

Nor does she plan to transfer her work to a computer.

“I don’t want one,” she said.

Mountain Legion sees jump in poppy donations

Money used to help local veterans and for upgrades at Branch 163

Community Dec 26, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Lucy Martin was beaming.

The chair of the poppy trust fund at Mount Hamilton Branch 163 of the Royal Canadian Legion says this year’s poppy campaign raised $64,323. 

That’s up from the $55,730 the Limeridge Road East Legion collected last year.

“I think it’s outstanding,” said Martin, who has been a longtime fixture at the Mountain branch. “It’s the volunteers that pull this together.”

That includes 60 volunteers who were on hand each day at Lime Ridge Mall from late October to Nov. 10 plus more than 75 donation boxes at locations across the Mountain.

“We got an awful lot of bills,” said Martin.

She said they collected $350 in $50 bills and a lot of appreciation.

“It isn’t anything for a Dutch person to come up and put in $50 and say to the veteran, ‘Thanks for my freedom.’ ”

Canadian soldiers liberated The Netherlands during the Second World War.

Martin said volunteers also collected $125 in U.S. coins and bills and $4 worth of Canadian Tire money.

She noted the move to $1 and $2 coins many years ago has helped bolster the donation boxes.

This year’s campaign helped push the Branch 163 poppy trust fund total to about $95,000.

Martin said the money will be used to help local veterans.

She figures they help 10-15 veterans each year. Most are Second World War vets.

Martin said she’s already looking at giving some money to help cover some dental work for one veteran, purchase a new mattress for another and supply a walker for another.

She encourages Canadian veterans who served in Afghanistan and elsewhere to visit the legion if they need help.

Martin said any veteran seeking assistance must show their discharge papers and provide information on which branch of the Canadian Forces they served with and where.

Any expenditure over $5,000 requires approval from the Dominion Command in Ottawa. Martin said in many of those cases, she will refer the vet to Veterans Affairs Canada.

Poppy trust fund money is also used for improvements to the legion building, such as electric doors and elevator maintenance, to make it easier for veterans to access.

Martin meticulously enters each trust fund deposit and expenditure by hand into the book ledger she has kept for many years.

The trust fund is audited each year.

At 89, Martin said she still enjoys overseeing the poppy trust fund and has no plans to give it up.

Nor does she plan to transfer her work to a computer.

“I don’t want one,” she said.

Mountain Legion sees jump in poppy donations

Money used to help local veterans and for upgrades at Branch 163

Community Dec 26, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Lucy Martin was beaming.

The chair of the poppy trust fund at Mount Hamilton Branch 163 of the Royal Canadian Legion says this year’s poppy campaign raised $64,323. 

That’s up from the $55,730 the Limeridge Road East Legion collected last year.

“I think it’s outstanding,” said Martin, who has been a longtime fixture at the Mountain branch. “It’s the volunteers that pull this together.”

That includes 60 volunteers who were on hand each day at Lime Ridge Mall from late October to Nov. 10 plus more than 75 donation boxes at locations across the Mountain.

“We got an awful lot of bills,” said Martin.

She said they collected $350 in $50 bills and a lot of appreciation.

“It isn’t anything for a Dutch person to come up and put in $50 and say to the veteran, ‘Thanks for my freedom.’ ”

Canadian soldiers liberated The Netherlands during the Second World War.

Martin said volunteers also collected $125 in U.S. coins and bills and $4 worth of Canadian Tire money.

She noted the move to $1 and $2 coins many years ago has helped bolster the donation boxes.

This year’s campaign helped push the Branch 163 poppy trust fund total to about $95,000.

Martin said the money will be used to help local veterans.

She figures they help 10-15 veterans each year. Most are Second World War vets.

Martin said she’s already looking at giving some money to help cover some dental work for one veteran, purchase a new mattress for another and supply a walker for another.

She encourages Canadian veterans who served in Afghanistan and elsewhere to visit the legion if they need help.

Martin said any veteran seeking assistance must show their discharge papers and provide information on which branch of the Canadian Forces they served with and where.

Any expenditure over $5,000 requires approval from the Dominion Command in Ottawa. Martin said in many of those cases, she will refer the vet to Veterans Affairs Canada.

Poppy trust fund money is also used for improvements to the legion building, such as electric doors and elevator maintenance, to make it easier for veterans to access.

Martin meticulously enters each trust fund deposit and expenditure by hand into the book ledger she has kept for many years.

The trust fund is audited each year.

At 89, Martin said she still enjoys overseeing the poppy trust fund and has no plans to give it up.

Nor does she plan to transfer her work to a computer.

“I don’t want one,” she said.