Clouds can't curb astronomy calendar's appeal

Community Dec 08, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

It’s not surprising an image of the sun adorns the cover of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers’ 2018 calendar.

After last summer’s solar eclipse, several photos from the rare event were submitted for consideration for the annual release.

Matthew Mannering, the editor of this year’s calendar, probably would have if things didn’t go horribly awry.

After travelling with a small group to Missouri to be in the narrow path where the sun would be completely blocked out by the moon, a dark cloud passed overhead about two minutes before the eclipse.

“Until about two minutes after,” says Mannering. “Wiped us out completely. Other than that, we would have at least seen it through the thin cloud.”

“A bunch of us were pretty dejected.”

The cover of this year’s calendar is, for the first time, an image of the sun.

“You get to see all the magnetic fields at work and the sunspots up close. He took a picture just before the eclipse was finished … It made a really interesting image (but) you can’t tell it was during the eclipse.”

There are several other eclipse-related photos in the calendar.

Mannering, a member of the club for about 10 years, is tackling the calendar editor job for the first time. He and his wife, Janice, have been regular contributors to the calendar since starting astrophotography four years ago.

Astronomy images can take several hours to photograph because of the very dim light. Then it may take hours to process the file, says Mannering.

“Each one can take a couple of days work,” he says. “They’re not snapshots.”

There were about 50 submissions for this year’s calendar; 26 images were used.

Mannering says getting the calendar ready for publication is a big task, but he had help from two previous editors, David Tym and John Gauvreau, to make the job easier.

He says one change he made was adding specific times for viewing each event. Previously, an event — say Mars and Jupiter being within one degree of each other — was noted on the day it fell on, but it was up to the reader to find the best time of day.

“Whether it’s six in the morning or nine at night, it makes a big difference,” he says. “I thought that was important.”

Calendars are $15 each (two for $25). This year’s calendar is nearly sold out; see amateurastronomy.org or email publicity@amateurastronomy.org.

Hamilton Amateur Astronomers is a non-profit organization that meets monthly public meetings, releases a monthly newsletter and holds public stargazing events throughout the year.

The next meeting is Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m., at the Hamilton Spectator, 44 Frid St.

Clouds can't curb astronomy calendar's appeal

Sun adorns cover of Hamilton Amateur Astronomers’ 2018 calendar

Community Dec 08, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

It’s not surprising an image of the sun adorns the cover of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers’ 2018 calendar.

After last summer’s solar eclipse, several photos from the rare event were submitted for consideration for the annual release.

Matthew Mannering, the editor of this year’s calendar, probably would have if things didn’t go horribly awry.

After travelling with a small group to Missouri to be in the narrow path where the sun would be completely blocked out by the moon, a dark cloud passed overhead about two minutes before the eclipse.

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“Until about two minutes after,” says Mannering. “Wiped us out completely. Other than that, we would have at least seen it through the thin cloud.”

“A bunch of us were pretty dejected.”

The cover of this year’s calendar is, for the first time, an image of the sun.

“You get to see all the magnetic fields at work and the sunspots up close. He took a picture just before the eclipse was finished … It made a really interesting image (but) you can’t tell it was during the eclipse.”

There are several other eclipse-related photos in the calendar.

Mannering, a member of the club for about 10 years, is tackling the calendar editor job for the first time. He and his wife, Janice, have been regular contributors to the calendar since starting astrophotography four years ago.

Astronomy images can take several hours to photograph because of the very dim light. Then it may take hours to process the file, says Mannering.

“Each one can take a couple of days work,” he says. “They’re not snapshots.”

There were about 50 submissions for this year’s calendar; 26 images were used.

Mannering says getting the calendar ready for publication is a big task, but he had help from two previous editors, David Tym and John Gauvreau, to make the job easier.

He says one change he made was adding specific times for viewing each event. Previously, an event — say Mars and Jupiter being within one degree of each other — was noted on the day it fell on, but it was up to the reader to find the best time of day.

“Whether it’s six in the morning or nine at night, it makes a big difference,” he says. “I thought that was important.”

Calendars are $15 each (two for $25). This year’s calendar is nearly sold out; see amateurastronomy.org or email publicity@amateurastronomy.org.

Hamilton Amateur Astronomers is a non-profit organization that meets monthly public meetings, releases a monthly newsletter and holds public stargazing events throughout the year.

The next meeting is Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m., at the Hamilton Spectator, 44 Frid St.

Clouds can't curb astronomy calendar's appeal

Sun adorns cover of Hamilton Amateur Astronomers’ 2018 calendar

Community Dec 08, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

It’s not surprising an image of the sun adorns the cover of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers’ 2018 calendar.

After last summer’s solar eclipse, several photos from the rare event were submitted for consideration for the annual release.

Matthew Mannering, the editor of this year’s calendar, probably would have if things didn’t go horribly awry.

After travelling with a small group to Missouri to be in the narrow path where the sun would be completely blocked out by the moon, a dark cloud passed overhead about two minutes before the eclipse.

Related Content

“Until about two minutes after,” says Mannering. “Wiped us out completely. Other than that, we would have at least seen it through the thin cloud.”

“A bunch of us were pretty dejected.”

The cover of this year’s calendar is, for the first time, an image of the sun.

“You get to see all the magnetic fields at work and the sunspots up close. He took a picture just before the eclipse was finished … It made a really interesting image (but) you can’t tell it was during the eclipse.”

There are several other eclipse-related photos in the calendar.

Mannering, a member of the club for about 10 years, is tackling the calendar editor job for the first time. He and his wife, Janice, have been regular contributors to the calendar since starting astrophotography four years ago.

Astronomy images can take several hours to photograph because of the very dim light. Then it may take hours to process the file, says Mannering.

“Each one can take a couple of days work,” he says. “They’re not snapshots.”

There were about 50 submissions for this year’s calendar; 26 images were used.

Mannering says getting the calendar ready for publication is a big task, but he had help from two previous editors, David Tym and John Gauvreau, to make the job easier.

He says one change he made was adding specific times for viewing each event. Previously, an event — say Mars and Jupiter being within one degree of each other — was noted on the day it fell on, but it was up to the reader to find the best time of day.

“Whether it’s six in the morning or nine at night, it makes a big difference,” he says. “I thought that was important.”

Calendars are $15 each (two for $25). This year’s calendar is nearly sold out; see amateurastronomy.org or email publicity@amateurastronomy.org.

Hamilton Amateur Astronomers is a non-profit organization that meets monthly public meetings, releases a monthly newsletter and holds public stargazing events throughout the year.

The next meeting is Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m., at the Hamilton Spectator, 44 Frid St.