Steeltown Toastmasters holding open house

Community Dec 07, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The club is nearly a century old, but the idea remains the same: help people improve their communication and leadership skills.

Toastmasters International was founded in 1924. While its name comes from giving toasts, which may seem a little passé in 2017, the basic principles are still very helpful.

“It’s not only helping you speak in front of groups, as a public speaker or MC, but it can also help people in management positions or leadership positions present seminars or lead meetings,” says Rosie Wolf Williams, vice-president of marketing and promotions for the Steeltown Toastmasters.

“It has so many layers that people don’t understand.”

The Steeltown chapter, which was founded in 1970 and meets Wednesdays at the Sackville Hill Seniors Centre, is holding an open house Dec. 20 to give people a chance to learn more about Toastmasters.

Williams, 58, says there are about 16 members right now, ranging in age from 30s to 60s. 

She says while it may seem like a club geared at older populations, Toastmasters can be very helpful to younger people, who may spend more time using text and email than face-to-face conversation.

“This offers them a chance to communicate and mingle with people in management positions, but parties, mixers, that sort of thing,” she says.

Williams, who runs her own writing, voice-over and communications business, says she joined about two and a half years ago to improve her public speaking ability and write better speeches.

She says it has been helpful for her when she runs workshops.

“Confidence wasn’t really the issue for me, it was being able to get in front of groups and gain experience and how to present on a stage,” says Williams.

Steeltown Toastmasters holding open house

Hamilton Mountain chapter shows people how to improve communication skills

Community Dec 07, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The club is nearly a century old, but the idea remains the same: help people improve their communication and leadership skills.

Toastmasters International was founded in 1924. While its name comes from giving toasts, which may seem a little passé in 2017, the basic principles are still very helpful.

“It’s not only helping you speak in front of groups, as a public speaker or MC, but it can also help people in management positions or leadership positions present seminars or lead meetings,” says Rosie Wolf Williams, vice-president of marketing and promotions for the Steeltown Toastmasters.

“It has so many layers that people don’t understand.”

Related Content

The Steeltown chapter, which was founded in 1970 and meets Wednesdays at the Sackville Hill Seniors Centre, is holding an open house Dec. 20 to give people a chance to learn more about Toastmasters.

Williams, 58, says there are about 16 members right now, ranging in age from 30s to 60s. 

She says while it may seem like a club geared at older populations, Toastmasters can be very helpful to younger people, who may spend more time using text and email than face-to-face conversation.

“This offers them a chance to communicate and mingle with people in management positions, but parties, mixers, that sort of thing,” she says.

Williams, who runs her own writing, voice-over and communications business, says she joined about two and a half years ago to improve her public speaking ability and write better speeches.

She says it has been helpful for her when she runs workshops.

“Confidence wasn’t really the issue for me, it was being able to get in front of groups and gain experience and how to present on a stage,” says Williams.

Steeltown Toastmasters holding open house

Hamilton Mountain chapter shows people how to improve communication skills

Community Dec 07, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The club is nearly a century old, but the idea remains the same: help people improve their communication and leadership skills.

Toastmasters International was founded in 1924. While its name comes from giving toasts, which may seem a little passé in 2017, the basic principles are still very helpful.

“It’s not only helping you speak in front of groups, as a public speaker or MC, but it can also help people in management positions or leadership positions present seminars or lead meetings,” says Rosie Wolf Williams, vice-president of marketing and promotions for the Steeltown Toastmasters.

“It has so many layers that people don’t understand.”

Related Content

The Steeltown chapter, which was founded in 1970 and meets Wednesdays at the Sackville Hill Seniors Centre, is holding an open house Dec. 20 to give people a chance to learn more about Toastmasters.

Williams, 58, says there are about 16 members right now, ranging in age from 30s to 60s. 

She says while it may seem like a club geared at older populations, Toastmasters can be very helpful to younger people, who may spend more time using text and email than face-to-face conversation.

“This offers them a chance to communicate and mingle with people in management positions, but parties, mixers, that sort of thing,” she says.

Williams, who runs her own writing, voice-over and communications business, says she joined about two and a half years ago to improve her public speaking ability and write better speeches.

She says it has been helpful for her when she runs workshops.

“Confidence wasn’t really the issue for me, it was being able to get in front of groups and gain experience and how to present on a stage,” says Williams.