Dundas Valley set for seventh native deer hunt

Community Oct 12, 2017 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The public is once again being asked to stay out of parts of the Dundas Valley on most weekdays between mid-November and early January to allow for the seventh annual Haudenosaunee deer hunt.

A schedule approved by Hamilton Conservation Authority directors will see the first leg of the six-week bow hunt begin in Ancaster on Nov. 13 in an area bounded by Martin, Jerseyville, Paddy Greene and Powerline roads.

Hunting will take place during daylight hours from Monday to Thursday until Dec. 7.

The Haudenosaunee will then break for Christmas, resuming the hunt from Jan. 2 to 12 on authority land in Dundas west of Weir’s Lane between Governor’s Road and the CN Rail line.

Chief administrative officer Lisa Burnside said the hunt areas and protocol are unchanged from last year, retaining a 60-deer limit — more than double last year’s harvest of 25, the fewest since the hunt began.

The hunts have killed 190 deer over the past six years, with a highest harvest of 37 in 2012.

Authority directors struck the hunt protocol in November 2011 after being advised the Haudenosaunee’s treaty rights allow them to hunt in the valley without permission.

“We’re pleased to continue this relationship we have with them,” Burnside said.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson urged staff to ensure there is plenty of public notice.

“It’s in my ward and it’s always controversial,” he said, asking for an update on the overpopulation of deer found in previous aerial surveys.

The last one in February 2013 counted 266 deer in an 880-hectare section, or about triple the number deemed ecologically desirable by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

Deputy chief administrative officer Scott Peck said the population remains too high but is a separate issue because the hunt solely relates to the treaty rights.

“Our ecologists are saying that, yes, there still are more deer in the valley than is sustainable from an ecological balance,” he said.

Dundas Valley set for seventh native deer hunt

Population still above sustainable level, authority directors told

Community Oct 12, 2017 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The public is once again being asked to stay out of parts of the Dundas Valley on most weekdays between mid-November and early January to allow for the seventh annual Haudenosaunee deer hunt.

A schedule approved by Hamilton Conservation Authority directors will see the first leg of the six-week bow hunt begin in Ancaster on Nov. 13 in an area bounded by Martin, Jerseyville, Paddy Greene and Powerline roads.

Hunting will take place during daylight hours from Monday to Thursday until Dec. 7.

The Haudenosaunee will then break for Christmas, resuming the hunt from Jan. 2 to 12 on authority land in Dundas west of Weir’s Lane between Governor’s Road and the CN Rail line.

It’s in my ward and it’s always controversial.

Chief administrative officer Lisa Burnside said the hunt areas and protocol are unchanged from last year, retaining a 60-deer limit — more than double last year’s harvest of 25, the fewest since the hunt began.

The hunts have killed 190 deer over the past six years, with a highest harvest of 37 in 2012.

Authority directors struck the hunt protocol in November 2011 after being advised the Haudenosaunee’s treaty rights allow them to hunt in the valley without permission.

“We’re pleased to continue this relationship we have with them,” Burnside said.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson urged staff to ensure there is plenty of public notice.

“It’s in my ward and it’s always controversial,” he said, asking for an update on the overpopulation of deer found in previous aerial surveys.

The last one in February 2013 counted 266 deer in an 880-hectare section, or about triple the number deemed ecologically desirable by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

Deputy chief administrative officer Scott Peck said the population remains too high but is a separate issue because the hunt solely relates to the treaty rights.

“Our ecologists are saying that, yes, there still are more deer in the valley than is sustainable from an ecological balance,” he said.

Dundas Valley set for seventh native deer hunt

Population still above sustainable level, authority directors told

Community Oct 12, 2017 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The public is once again being asked to stay out of parts of the Dundas Valley on most weekdays between mid-November and early January to allow for the seventh annual Haudenosaunee deer hunt.

A schedule approved by Hamilton Conservation Authority directors will see the first leg of the six-week bow hunt begin in Ancaster on Nov. 13 in an area bounded by Martin, Jerseyville, Paddy Greene and Powerline roads.

Hunting will take place during daylight hours from Monday to Thursday until Dec. 7.

The Haudenosaunee will then break for Christmas, resuming the hunt from Jan. 2 to 12 on authority land in Dundas west of Weir’s Lane between Governor’s Road and the CN Rail line.

It’s in my ward and it’s always controversial.

Chief administrative officer Lisa Burnside said the hunt areas and protocol are unchanged from last year, retaining a 60-deer limit — more than double last year’s harvest of 25, the fewest since the hunt began.

The hunts have killed 190 deer over the past six years, with a highest harvest of 37 in 2012.

Authority directors struck the hunt protocol in November 2011 after being advised the Haudenosaunee’s treaty rights allow them to hunt in the valley without permission.

“We’re pleased to continue this relationship we have with them,” Burnside said.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson urged staff to ensure there is plenty of public notice.

“It’s in my ward and it’s always controversial,” he said, asking for an update on the overpopulation of deer found in previous aerial surveys.

The last one in February 2013 counted 266 deer in an 880-hectare section, or about triple the number deemed ecologically desirable by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

Deputy chief administrative officer Scott Peck said the population remains too high but is a separate issue because the hunt solely relates to the treaty rights.

“Our ecologists are saying that, yes, there still are more deer in the valley than is sustainable from an ecological balance,” he said.