Max’s Big Ride raises funds for Duchenne muscular dystrophy research

Community May 10, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Max Sedmihradsky, 6, is “holding stable” while promising research into a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy gets underway at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Max, a Grade 1 student and proud big brother to toddler Isla, was diagnosed with the progressive disorder three years ago. It affects roughly one in 3,500 boys, and most children who suffer from it are unlikely to live past the age of 30.

“We haven’t seen any rapid deterioration,” said Max’s dad, Andrew. “Max is holding stable. He doesn’t seem to be getting any weaker, which is what you want to see, barring a cure.”

For the third consecutive year, Max and Andrew will travel 600 kilometres on a cargo bike to raise funds and awareness for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Max’s Big Ride starts in Hamilton on Sunday, June 4 and ends with a reception on Parliament Hill in Ottawa at noon on Monday, June 12.

The proceeds from this year’s ride will go toward establishing a doctoral fellowship in hopes of finding ways to not only prevent the muscle atrophy that characterizes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but reverse existing damage so those confined to a wheelchair can regain their mobility. The research will be conducted at the University of Toronto Mississauga, where Sedmihradsky works, by internationally recognized Dr. Patrick Gunning and his team.

“(The research) really speaks to what it’s like to work in a place like this,” said Sedmihradsky. “There are people in this very building who have the power to change Max’s life. It’s unbelievable.”

New to this year’s fundraiser is an Ice Cream Ride, where cyclists are invited to join the Sedmihradskys on the first few kilometres of their trek. Participants will be rewarded with frozen treats and a tasty lunch.

In conjunction with Max’s Big Ride, Max’s Big Climb is also planned for later this summer. Cyclists can test their meddle against the iconic Sydenham Hill in Dundas. The 2017 edition on Saturday, July 15 will have four elements — an individual time trial, the King and Queen of the Mountain contest, the hour-long Horse Kill Hill team relay and an untimed Hill Challenge ride.

To learn more, visit www.maxsbigride.com.



Max’s Big Ride raises funds for Duchenne muscular dystrophy research

Max and Andrew Sedmihradsky get ready for third Hamilton/Ottawa cargo bike ride

Community May 10, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Max Sedmihradsky, 6, is “holding stable” while promising research into a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy gets underway at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Max, a Grade 1 student and proud big brother to toddler Isla, was diagnosed with the progressive disorder three years ago. It affects roughly one in 3,500 boys, and most children who suffer from it are unlikely to live past the age of 30.

“We haven’t seen any rapid deterioration,” said Max’s dad, Andrew. “Max is holding stable. He doesn’t seem to be getting any weaker, which is what you want to see, barring a cure.”

For the third consecutive year, Max and Andrew will travel 600 kilometres on a cargo bike to raise funds and awareness for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Max’s Big Ride starts in Hamilton on Sunday, June 4 and ends with a reception on Parliament Hill in Ottawa at noon on Monday, June 12.

Max is holding stable. He doesn’t seem to be getting any weaker, which is what you want to see, barring a cure.

The proceeds from this year’s ride will go toward establishing a doctoral fellowship in hopes of finding ways to not only prevent the muscle atrophy that characterizes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but reverse existing damage so those confined to a wheelchair can regain their mobility. The research will be conducted at the University of Toronto Mississauga, where Sedmihradsky works, by internationally recognized Dr. Patrick Gunning and his team.

“(The research) really speaks to what it’s like to work in a place like this,” said Sedmihradsky. “There are people in this very building who have the power to change Max’s life. It’s unbelievable.”

New to this year’s fundraiser is an Ice Cream Ride, where cyclists are invited to join the Sedmihradskys on the first few kilometres of their trek. Participants will be rewarded with frozen treats and a tasty lunch.

In conjunction with Max’s Big Ride, Max’s Big Climb is also planned for later this summer. Cyclists can test their meddle against the iconic Sydenham Hill in Dundas. The 2017 edition on Saturday, July 15 will have four elements — an individual time trial, the King and Queen of the Mountain contest, the hour-long Horse Kill Hill team relay and an untimed Hill Challenge ride.

To learn more, visit www.maxsbigride.com.



Max’s Big Ride raises funds for Duchenne muscular dystrophy research

Max and Andrew Sedmihradsky get ready for third Hamilton/Ottawa cargo bike ride

Community May 10, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Max Sedmihradsky, 6, is “holding stable” while promising research into a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy gets underway at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Max, a Grade 1 student and proud big brother to toddler Isla, was diagnosed with the progressive disorder three years ago. It affects roughly one in 3,500 boys, and most children who suffer from it are unlikely to live past the age of 30.

“We haven’t seen any rapid deterioration,” said Max’s dad, Andrew. “Max is holding stable. He doesn’t seem to be getting any weaker, which is what you want to see, barring a cure.”

For the third consecutive year, Max and Andrew will travel 600 kilometres on a cargo bike to raise funds and awareness for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Max’s Big Ride starts in Hamilton on Sunday, June 4 and ends with a reception on Parliament Hill in Ottawa at noon on Monday, June 12.

Max is holding stable. He doesn’t seem to be getting any weaker, which is what you want to see, barring a cure.

The proceeds from this year’s ride will go toward establishing a doctoral fellowship in hopes of finding ways to not only prevent the muscle atrophy that characterizes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but reverse existing damage so those confined to a wheelchair can regain their mobility. The research will be conducted at the University of Toronto Mississauga, where Sedmihradsky works, by internationally recognized Dr. Patrick Gunning and his team.

“(The research) really speaks to what it’s like to work in a place like this,” said Sedmihradsky. “There are people in this very building who have the power to change Max’s life. It’s unbelievable.”

New to this year’s fundraiser is an Ice Cream Ride, where cyclists are invited to join the Sedmihradskys on the first few kilometres of their trek. Participants will be rewarded with frozen treats and a tasty lunch.

In conjunction with Max’s Big Ride, Max’s Big Climb is also planned for later this summer. Cyclists can test their meddle against the iconic Sydenham Hill in Dundas. The 2017 edition on Saturday, July 15 will have four elements — an individual time trial, the King and Queen of the Mountain contest, the hour-long Horse Kill Hill team relay and an untimed Hill Challenge ride.

To learn more, visit www.maxsbigride.com.