Mohawk College Stoney Creek campus showcases automotive skilled trades at open house

Community Apr 28, 2017 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Phoebe Hawkyard is taking the fast lane to a new career in the truck and coach field.

Hawkyard, 24, had no idea about her future career prospects after graduating from high school six years ago.

Four years ago, after rigorous aptitude testing at the YMCA, Hawkyard scored in the 98th percentile for mechanical learning.

“I’ve loved cars my whole life, that’s thanks to my father,” Hawkyard said.

But Hawkyard didn’t want to limit herself to just cars. Encouraged by a friend studying in the field, she decided to enrol in the truck and coach apprenticeship program at Mohawk College's Stoney Creek campus.

Just two weeks into the program, Hawkyard is impressed with the program and its instructors.

“I love it,” she said during an April 27 open house. "That shop has everything and more than we could ever want to know about. And the teachers are amazing. I’ve never had teachers like that before.”

As a woman looking to make her mark in a traditionally male-dominated profession, Hawkyard is ready to face the stereotyping.

“Guys look at you and it’s like, ‘What are you doing here?’”

“I’m not scared. I’m ready to show them what I’ve got.”

Hawkyard plans to work at a dealership after completing the Mohawk apprenticeship program.

Truck and coach apprenticeship instructor Max Corradetti said those who successfully complete the program will still have a lifetime of learning ahead of them to keep on top of the latest advancements.

“The technology has come a long way,” said Corradetti, who’s been at the college for 39 years. “The old greasy truck mechanic is gone.”

One thing Corradetti tells his students is that by staying up-to-date with their learning, they can expect a job for life. He notes that millions of passenger and commercial vehicles are kept on the road thanks to automotive service technicians and that virtually all consumer products sold in stores are transported by truck.

Doug Daniels, associate dean at Mohawk College’s School of Industrial and Motive Power, said businesses in the automotive field are looking to hire skilled graduates for well-paid careers. The April 27 open house included several businesses in the truck and coach, automotive service and auto body fields. The evening event was billed as: Your Future in Automotive and Power Careers.

Daniels said the open house was designed to connect employers with students thinking about pursuing a trade. Students in Grades 9-11 from across the Hamilton area were invited to attend.

“It makes it easier for (students) to decide. This is a viable path,” said Daniels.

With automation and computer diagnostics changing the face of the automotive service industry, Daniels sees this evolution not as a challenge, but as the next step.

“I don’t think it’s a challenge with automation, I think it’s enhancing what our kids are going to be able to do,” said Daniels. “They have to be very intelligent in a different way.”

Daniels noted that an auto mechanic position used to be viewed at as a low-level job.

“That’s no longer, because of that fact, the automation side of it, the electronics and programing,” said Daniels. “We need to take our kids to the next higher level.”

More than 150 trades are recognized in Ontario. At the secondary school level, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship program offers apprenticeships in construction, industrial, motive power and service.

Examples of apprenticeships in the motive power classification include automotive service technician, automotive painter and marine engine technician.

Mohawk College Stoney Creek campus showcases automotive skilled trades at open house

Community Apr 28, 2017 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Phoebe Hawkyard is taking the fast lane to a new career in the truck and coach field.

Hawkyard, 24, had no idea about her future career prospects after graduating from high school six years ago.

Four years ago, after rigorous aptitude testing at the YMCA, Hawkyard scored in the 98th percentile for mechanical learning.

“I’ve loved cars my whole life, that’s thanks to my father,” Hawkyard said.

But Hawkyard didn’t want to limit herself to just cars. Encouraged by a friend studying in the field, she decided to enrol in the truck and coach apprenticeship program at Mohawk College's Stoney Creek campus.

Just two weeks into the program, Hawkyard is impressed with the program and its instructors.

“I love it,” she said during an April 27 open house. "That shop has everything and more than we could ever want to know about. And the teachers are amazing. I’ve never had teachers like that before.”

As a woman looking to make her mark in a traditionally male-dominated profession, Hawkyard is ready to face the stereotyping.

“Guys look at you and it’s like, ‘What are you doing here?’”

“I’m not scared. I’m ready to show them what I’ve got.”

Hawkyard plans to work at a dealership after completing the Mohawk apprenticeship program.

Truck and coach apprenticeship instructor Max Corradetti said those who successfully complete the program will still have a lifetime of learning ahead of them to keep on top of the latest advancements.

“The technology has come a long way,” said Corradetti, who’s been at the college for 39 years. “The old greasy truck mechanic is gone.”

One thing Corradetti tells his students is that by staying up-to-date with their learning, they can expect a job for life. He notes that millions of passenger and commercial vehicles are kept on the road thanks to automotive service technicians and that virtually all consumer products sold in stores are transported by truck.

Doug Daniels, associate dean at Mohawk College’s School of Industrial and Motive Power, said businesses in the automotive field are looking to hire skilled graduates for well-paid careers. The April 27 open house included several businesses in the truck and coach, automotive service and auto body fields. The evening event was billed as: Your Future in Automotive and Power Careers.

Daniels said the open house was designed to connect employers with students thinking about pursuing a trade. Students in Grades 9-11 from across the Hamilton area were invited to attend.

“It makes it easier for (students) to decide. This is a viable path,” said Daniels.

With automation and computer diagnostics changing the face of the automotive service industry, Daniels sees this evolution not as a challenge, but as the next step.

“I don’t think it’s a challenge with automation, I think it’s enhancing what our kids are going to be able to do,” said Daniels. “They have to be very intelligent in a different way.”

Daniels noted that an auto mechanic position used to be viewed at as a low-level job.

“That’s no longer, because of that fact, the automation side of it, the electronics and programing,” said Daniels. “We need to take our kids to the next higher level.”

More than 150 trades are recognized in Ontario. At the secondary school level, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship program offers apprenticeships in construction, industrial, motive power and service.

Examples of apprenticeships in the motive power classification include automotive service technician, automotive painter and marine engine technician.

Mohawk College Stoney Creek campus showcases automotive skilled trades at open house

Community Apr 28, 2017 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Phoebe Hawkyard is taking the fast lane to a new career in the truck and coach field.

Hawkyard, 24, had no idea about her future career prospects after graduating from high school six years ago.

Four years ago, after rigorous aptitude testing at the YMCA, Hawkyard scored in the 98th percentile for mechanical learning.

“I’ve loved cars my whole life, that’s thanks to my father,” Hawkyard said.

But Hawkyard didn’t want to limit herself to just cars. Encouraged by a friend studying in the field, she decided to enrol in the truck and coach apprenticeship program at Mohawk College's Stoney Creek campus.

Just two weeks into the program, Hawkyard is impressed with the program and its instructors.

“I love it,” she said during an April 27 open house. "That shop has everything and more than we could ever want to know about. And the teachers are amazing. I’ve never had teachers like that before.”

As a woman looking to make her mark in a traditionally male-dominated profession, Hawkyard is ready to face the stereotyping.

“Guys look at you and it’s like, ‘What are you doing here?’”

“I’m not scared. I’m ready to show them what I’ve got.”

Hawkyard plans to work at a dealership after completing the Mohawk apprenticeship program.

Truck and coach apprenticeship instructor Max Corradetti said those who successfully complete the program will still have a lifetime of learning ahead of them to keep on top of the latest advancements.

“The technology has come a long way,” said Corradetti, who’s been at the college for 39 years. “The old greasy truck mechanic is gone.”

One thing Corradetti tells his students is that by staying up-to-date with their learning, they can expect a job for life. He notes that millions of passenger and commercial vehicles are kept on the road thanks to automotive service technicians and that virtually all consumer products sold in stores are transported by truck.

Doug Daniels, associate dean at Mohawk College’s School of Industrial and Motive Power, said businesses in the automotive field are looking to hire skilled graduates for well-paid careers. The April 27 open house included several businesses in the truck and coach, automotive service and auto body fields. The evening event was billed as: Your Future in Automotive and Power Careers.

Daniels said the open house was designed to connect employers with students thinking about pursuing a trade. Students in Grades 9-11 from across the Hamilton area were invited to attend.

“It makes it easier for (students) to decide. This is a viable path,” said Daniels.

With automation and computer diagnostics changing the face of the automotive service industry, Daniels sees this evolution not as a challenge, but as the next step.

“I don’t think it’s a challenge with automation, I think it’s enhancing what our kids are going to be able to do,” said Daniels. “They have to be very intelligent in a different way.”

Daniels noted that an auto mechanic position used to be viewed at as a low-level job.

“That’s no longer, because of that fact, the automation side of it, the electronics and programing,” said Daniels. “We need to take our kids to the next higher level.”

More than 150 trades are recognized in Ontario. At the secondary school level, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship program offers apprenticeships in construction, industrial, motive power and service.

Examples of apprenticeships in the motive power classification include automotive service technician, automotive painter and marine engine technician.