Dundas’ Robert Knuckle shares his knowledge of the Titanic

Community Apr 06, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Interesting things tend to happen when retired educator Robert Knuckle has a little time on his hands.

The author and scriptwriter will share one of his lesser-known hobbies with the public when the Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association hosts a fundraising lecture later this month.

Knuckle will regale his audience with tales of the Titanic; in particular, Canada’s role in the tragedy. The Dundas resident began to pursue his interest in the disaster shortly after his retirement in 1992.

“I was twiddling my thumbs and didn’t know what to do, so I decided to become a Titanic researcher for Encyclopedia Titanica,” said Knuckle.

The online reference work contains extensive and constantly-updated information on the Titanic. Volunteers from around the world focus on specific topics, conduct their research and send the findings to Encyclopedia Titanica for inclusion on the website.

The ship collided with an iceberg on April 14, 1912, during its maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. It sank to its watery grave the following morning, killing more than 1,500 passengers.

Knuckle said Canada didn’t play a significant role in the actual sinking of the Titanic.

“We didn’t design the ship or build it or crew it,” said Knuckle. “Only 22 Canadians were on the Titanic when it sank. Twelve of them were saved; 10 of them died at sea.”

However, after the ship sank, Canadians played a critical role in retrieving bodies from the frigid water. In an attempt to identify the deceased, seamen meticulously recorded information on everyone they found.

Canadians buried many of the passengers at sea and brought others back to Halifax where the remains were stored until relatives arrived, said Knuckle.

“The unclaimed bodies were ultimately buried in three Halifax graveyards, with honour and respect on Canadian soil,” said Knuckle.

The Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association lecture takes place on Wednesday, April 26 at 7 p.m. at Nash Jackson House, 77 King St. W., Stoney Creek.

Knuckle’s power point presentation will feature roughly 100 slides that deal with Canada’s role in the Titanic tragedy.

Tickets are $10. For more information, email hwheritage@gmail.com or call Robin McKee at 905-544-9559.

Along with his work as a volunteer research contributor with Encyclopedia Titanica, Knuckle is the author of 11 books, most of which deal with true crime or the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He has also written for radio, television, cinema and the stage.

Dundas’ Robert Knuckle shares his knowledge of the Titanic

Encyclopedia Titanica researcher speaks at Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association lecture

Community Apr 06, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Interesting things tend to happen when retired educator Robert Knuckle has a little time on his hands.

The author and scriptwriter will share one of his lesser-known hobbies with the public when the Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association hosts a fundraising lecture later this month.

Knuckle will regale his audience with tales of the Titanic; in particular, Canada’s role in the tragedy. The Dundas resident began to pursue his interest in the disaster shortly after his retirement in 1992.

“I was twiddling my thumbs and didn’t know what to do, so I decided to become a Titanic researcher for Encyclopedia Titanica,” said Knuckle.

“The unclaimed bodies were ultimately buried in three Halifax graveyards, with honour and respect on Canadian soil.”

The online reference work contains extensive and constantly-updated information on the Titanic. Volunteers from around the world focus on specific topics, conduct their research and send the findings to Encyclopedia Titanica for inclusion on the website.

The ship collided with an iceberg on April 14, 1912, during its maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. It sank to its watery grave the following morning, killing more than 1,500 passengers.

Knuckle said Canada didn’t play a significant role in the actual sinking of the Titanic.

“We didn’t design the ship or build it or crew it,” said Knuckle. “Only 22 Canadians were on the Titanic when it sank. Twelve of them were saved; 10 of them died at sea.”

However, after the ship sank, Canadians played a critical role in retrieving bodies from the frigid water. In an attempt to identify the deceased, seamen meticulously recorded information on everyone they found.

Canadians buried many of the passengers at sea and brought others back to Halifax where the remains were stored until relatives arrived, said Knuckle.

“The unclaimed bodies were ultimately buried in three Halifax graveyards, with honour and respect on Canadian soil,” said Knuckle.

The Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association lecture takes place on Wednesday, April 26 at 7 p.m. at Nash Jackson House, 77 King St. W., Stoney Creek.

Knuckle’s power point presentation will feature roughly 100 slides that deal with Canada’s role in the Titanic tragedy.

Tickets are $10. For more information, email hwheritage@gmail.com or call Robin McKee at 905-544-9559.

Along with his work as a volunteer research contributor with Encyclopedia Titanica, Knuckle is the author of 11 books, most of which deal with true crime or the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He has also written for radio, television, cinema and the stage.

Dundas’ Robert Knuckle shares his knowledge of the Titanic

Encyclopedia Titanica researcher speaks at Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association lecture

Community Apr 06, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Interesting things tend to happen when retired educator Robert Knuckle has a little time on his hands.

The author and scriptwriter will share one of his lesser-known hobbies with the public when the Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association hosts a fundraising lecture later this month.

Knuckle will regale his audience with tales of the Titanic; in particular, Canada’s role in the tragedy. The Dundas resident began to pursue his interest in the disaster shortly after his retirement in 1992.

“I was twiddling my thumbs and didn’t know what to do, so I decided to become a Titanic researcher for Encyclopedia Titanica,” said Knuckle.

“The unclaimed bodies were ultimately buried in three Halifax graveyards, with honour and respect on Canadian soil.”

The online reference work contains extensive and constantly-updated information on the Titanic. Volunteers from around the world focus on specific topics, conduct their research and send the findings to Encyclopedia Titanica for inclusion on the website.

The ship collided with an iceberg on April 14, 1912, during its maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. It sank to its watery grave the following morning, killing more than 1,500 passengers.

Knuckle said Canada didn’t play a significant role in the actual sinking of the Titanic.

“We didn’t design the ship or build it or crew it,” said Knuckle. “Only 22 Canadians were on the Titanic when it sank. Twelve of them were saved; 10 of them died at sea.”

However, after the ship sank, Canadians played a critical role in retrieving bodies from the frigid water. In an attempt to identify the deceased, seamen meticulously recorded information on everyone they found.

Canadians buried many of the passengers at sea and brought others back to Halifax where the remains were stored until relatives arrived, said Knuckle.

“The unclaimed bodies were ultimately buried in three Halifax graveyards, with honour and respect on Canadian soil,” said Knuckle.

The Hamilton-Wentworth Heritage Association lecture takes place on Wednesday, April 26 at 7 p.m. at Nash Jackson House, 77 King St. W., Stoney Creek.

Knuckle’s power point presentation will feature roughly 100 slides that deal with Canada’s role in the Titanic tragedy.

Tickets are $10. For more information, email hwheritage@gmail.com or call Robin McKee at 905-544-9559.

Along with his work as a volunteer research contributor with Encyclopedia Titanica, Knuckle is the author of 11 books, most of which deal with true crime or the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He has also written for radio, television, cinema and the stage.