HCA flood study seeks to tone down ‘flashy’ Stoney, Battlefield creeks

Community Apr 06, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Raising roadways and digging new storm water ponds are among solutions a Hamilton Conservation Authority study is considering to control flash flooding along Stoney and Battlefield creeks.

Other preliminary alternatives offered at a March 28 open house include improving the water storage of existing wetlands in the creeks’ watersheds above the escarpment and a combination of all three measures.

“It’s trying to hold the water back on the land and letting it slowly release so that you’re addressing those downstream flooding and erosion issues,” said Scott Peck, the authority’s director of watershed planning and engineering.

He said the other goal is to augment the creeks’ flow so they don’t run dry when there’s little or no rainfall.

“They’re very flashy systems. When it rains the water moves quite quickly and then when the rain stops or the run-off is done, the watercourses go dry.”

Among the possibilities is either creating a wetland at the authority’s new 72-hectare conservation area near the Devil’s Punch Bowl or raising the height of First Road East along its western edge to retain water there.

Peck said the authority may also buy other land in the area on a willing-seller basis in the next five to 10 years to create new wetlands and storage ponds as part of the $4.75-million project.

The Dofasco Trail is presently “the spine” of the fledgling conservation area, but there may be opportunities for other trails depending on where land is bought, he said.

The city and Taro dump’s Heritage Green Community Trust are contributing $2 million apiece to the initiative, with the authority and its charitable foundation funding the balance.

Gabriella Casimirri, who along with her husband, Enio, was among the 20 residents to drop by the Croatian Community Centre for the open house, said she liked the plan to expand the conservation area.

“It sounds wonderful, especially with the Dofasco Trail around and having the Bruce Trail (nearby),” the Third Road East resident said. “It’s nice that they’re doing something. We need the natural environment.”

But Paul Domingues, who has a stretch of creek running through his property by the corner of Green Mountain Road and Fifth Road East, said he worries solving problems below the escarpment will increase flooding in his area.

He said the Red Hill Valley Parkway’s flooding woes don’t give him faith human engineering always works as promised.

“To prevent the flooding, clean the culverts, clean the ditches; that would be the number 1 thing,” Domingues said.

“The problem is everything’s flooded because everything’s never been cleaned. The culverts, the ditches — everything’s blocked.”

Peck said keeping culverts and ditches clear will help, but won’t solve downstream flooding or keep the creeks flowing during dry periods.

He said the proposed solutions are concepts at this point and a preferred option will be presented at a second open house, likely in the late spring or September.

HCA flood study seeks to tone down ‘flashy’ Stoney, Battlefield creeks

New wetlands, higher roadways among potential solutions

Community Apr 06, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Raising roadways and digging new storm water ponds are among solutions a Hamilton Conservation Authority study is considering to control flash flooding along Stoney and Battlefield creeks.

Other preliminary alternatives offered at a March 28 open house include improving the water storage of existing wetlands in the creeks’ watersheds above the escarpment and a combination of all three measures.

“It’s trying to hold the water back on the land and letting it slowly release so that you’re addressing those downstream flooding and erosion issues,” said Scott Peck, the authority’s director of watershed planning and engineering.

He said the other goal is to augment the creeks’ flow so they don’t run dry when there’s little or no rainfall.

"When it rains the water moves quite quickly and then when the rain stops or the run-off is done, the watercourses go dry.”

“They’re very flashy systems. When it rains the water moves quite quickly and then when the rain stops or the run-off is done, the watercourses go dry.”

Among the possibilities is either creating a wetland at the authority’s new 72-hectare conservation area near the Devil’s Punch Bowl or raising the height of First Road East along its western edge to retain water there.

Peck said the authority may also buy other land in the area on a willing-seller basis in the next five to 10 years to create new wetlands and storage ponds as part of the $4.75-million project.

The Dofasco Trail is presently “the spine” of the fledgling conservation area, but there may be opportunities for other trails depending on where land is bought, he said.

The city and Taro dump’s Heritage Green Community Trust are contributing $2 million apiece to the initiative, with the authority and its charitable foundation funding the balance.

Gabriella Casimirri, who along with her husband, Enio, was among the 20 residents to drop by the Croatian Community Centre for the open house, said she liked the plan to expand the conservation area.

“It sounds wonderful, especially with the Dofasco Trail around and having the Bruce Trail (nearby),” the Third Road East resident said. “It’s nice that they’re doing something. We need the natural environment.”

But Paul Domingues, who has a stretch of creek running through his property by the corner of Green Mountain Road and Fifth Road East, said he worries solving problems below the escarpment will increase flooding in his area.

He said the Red Hill Valley Parkway’s flooding woes don’t give him faith human engineering always works as promised.

“To prevent the flooding, clean the culverts, clean the ditches; that would be the number 1 thing,” Domingues said.

“The problem is everything’s flooded because everything’s never been cleaned. The culverts, the ditches — everything’s blocked.”

Peck said keeping culverts and ditches clear will help, but won’t solve downstream flooding or keep the creeks flowing during dry periods.

He said the proposed solutions are concepts at this point and a preferred option will be presented at a second open house, likely in the late spring or September.

HCA flood study seeks to tone down ‘flashy’ Stoney, Battlefield creeks

New wetlands, higher roadways among potential solutions

Community Apr 06, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Raising roadways and digging new storm water ponds are among solutions a Hamilton Conservation Authority study is considering to control flash flooding along Stoney and Battlefield creeks.

Other preliminary alternatives offered at a March 28 open house include improving the water storage of existing wetlands in the creeks’ watersheds above the escarpment and a combination of all three measures.

“It’s trying to hold the water back on the land and letting it slowly release so that you’re addressing those downstream flooding and erosion issues,” said Scott Peck, the authority’s director of watershed planning and engineering.

He said the other goal is to augment the creeks’ flow so they don’t run dry when there’s little or no rainfall.

"When it rains the water moves quite quickly and then when the rain stops or the run-off is done, the watercourses go dry.”

“They’re very flashy systems. When it rains the water moves quite quickly and then when the rain stops or the run-off is done, the watercourses go dry.”

Among the possibilities is either creating a wetland at the authority’s new 72-hectare conservation area near the Devil’s Punch Bowl or raising the height of First Road East along its western edge to retain water there.

Peck said the authority may also buy other land in the area on a willing-seller basis in the next five to 10 years to create new wetlands and storage ponds as part of the $4.75-million project.

The Dofasco Trail is presently “the spine” of the fledgling conservation area, but there may be opportunities for other trails depending on where land is bought, he said.

The city and Taro dump’s Heritage Green Community Trust are contributing $2 million apiece to the initiative, with the authority and its charitable foundation funding the balance.

Gabriella Casimirri, who along with her husband, Enio, was among the 20 residents to drop by the Croatian Community Centre for the open house, said she liked the plan to expand the conservation area.

“It sounds wonderful, especially with the Dofasco Trail around and having the Bruce Trail (nearby),” the Third Road East resident said. “It’s nice that they’re doing something. We need the natural environment.”

But Paul Domingues, who has a stretch of creek running through his property by the corner of Green Mountain Road and Fifth Road East, said he worries solving problems below the escarpment will increase flooding in his area.

He said the Red Hill Valley Parkway’s flooding woes don’t give him faith human engineering always works as promised.

“To prevent the flooding, clean the culverts, clean the ditches; that would be the number 1 thing,” Domingues said.

“The problem is everything’s flooded because everything’s never been cleaned. The culverts, the ditches — everything’s blocked.”

Peck said keeping culverts and ditches clear will help, but won’t solve downstream flooding or keep the creeks flowing during dry periods.

He said the proposed solutions are concepts at this point and a preferred option will be presented at a second open house, likely in the late spring or September.