Hamilton City Ballet joins World Dance for Parkinson’s Day virtual event

Community Mar 24, 2017 Dundas Star News

The Dundas-based Hamilton City Ballet will join nationally and internationally-acclaimed dance companies, community schools and independent teaching artists to showcase the diversity of dance-based programming for people with Parkinson’s.

The event will start unfolding on World Parkinson’s Day on April 11, and culminate in the full launch of the portal on International Dance Day/World Dance for Parkinson’s Day on April 29. The free online portal created specifically for the event — www.danceforparkinsons.online — will spotlight Dance for Parkinson’s classes and workshops from 12 cities on four continents.

Jody Van de Klippe, program director of Hamilton City Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s, said it is both inspiring and humbling to be a part of the program.

“We are excited for this opportunity to share our class, as well as our research collaboration, with the world. We all dance in the same language,” she said.

Parkinson’s affects more than 10 million people around the globe. A growing body of scientific research suggests that participating in a Dance for Parkinson’s program improves short-term mobility, balance, co-ordination and walking for people with Parkinson’s, as well as supporting social inclusion, positive mood and confidence.

Hamilton City Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s, which was launched in April 2013, is a series of ballet classes designed and created for people who have the disease.

Hamilton City Ballet joins World Dance for Parkinson’s Day virtual event

Community Mar 24, 2017 Dundas Star News

The Dundas-based Hamilton City Ballet will join nationally and internationally-acclaimed dance companies, community schools and independent teaching artists to showcase the diversity of dance-based programming for people with Parkinson’s.

The event will start unfolding on World Parkinson’s Day on April 11, and culminate in the full launch of the portal on International Dance Day/World Dance for Parkinson’s Day on April 29. The free online portal created specifically for the event — www.danceforparkinsons.online — will spotlight Dance for Parkinson’s classes and workshops from 12 cities on four continents.

Jody Van de Klippe, program director of Hamilton City Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s, said it is both inspiring and humbling to be a part of the program.

“We are excited for this opportunity to share our class, as well as our research collaboration, with the world. We all dance in the same language,” she said.

“We all dance in the same language.”

Parkinson’s affects more than 10 million people around the globe. A growing body of scientific research suggests that participating in a Dance for Parkinson’s program improves short-term mobility, balance, co-ordination and walking for people with Parkinson’s, as well as supporting social inclusion, positive mood and confidence.

Hamilton City Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s, which was launched in April 2013, is a series of ballet classes designed and created for people who have the disease.

Hamilton City Ballet joins World Dance for Parkinson’s Day virtual event

Community Mar 24, 2017 Dundas Star News

The Dundas-based Hamilton City Ballet will join nationally and internationally-acclaimed dance companies, community schools and independent teaching artists to showcase the diversity of dance-based programming for people with Parkinson’s.

The event will start unfolding on World Parkinson’s Day on April 11, and culminate in the full launch of the portal on International Dance Day/World Dance for Parkinson’s Day on April 29. The free online portal created specifically for the event — www.danceforparkinsons.online — will spotlight Dance for Parkinson’s classes and workshops from 12 cities on four continents.

Jody Van de Klippe, program director of Hamilton City Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s, said it is both inspiring and humbling to be a part of the program.

“We are excited for this opportunity to share our class, as well as our research collaboration, with the world. We all dance in the same language,” she said.

“We all dance in the same language.”

Parkinson’s affects more than 10 million people around the globe. A growing body of scientific research suggests that participating in a Dance for Parkinson’s program improves short-term mobility, balance, co-ordination and walking for people with Parkinson’s, as well as supporting social inclusion, positive mood and confidence.

Hamilton City Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s, which was launched in April 2013, is a series of ballet classes designed and created for people who have the disease.