New Taro dump options aim higher, wider or both

Community Feb 16, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The owner of the Taro industrial dump is offering six new potential ways to meet its goal of increasing the site’s capacity — including two that pile waste closer to neighbouring homes, businesses and a future elementary school.

Terrapure Environmental's revised terms of reference for an environmental assessment on its expansion bid scrap two original options from last June that proposed to raise the upper Stoney Creek dump’s height by three to four metres.

The six new options all still seek to increase Taro’s waste capacity to 10 million cubic metres, up from the existing limit of 6.32 million, but do so by either raising the site’s height, expanding its approved footprint or both.

Terrapure doesn’t quantify how much the new “alternative methods” will alter the dump’s height or footprint, unlike on the original proposals, which were opposed by a community liaison committee for the site and the area’s councillor, Doug Conley.

Greg Jones, the company’s communications director, said the new options reflect feedback from the public, city and provincial regulators, and are “intended to be conceptual”.

“It’s as far as we’ve taken things at this point,” he said. “No specific details have been developed yet because that would happen during the (environmental assessment) phase if the terms of reference are approved.”

The public is being given until March 10 to comment on the revised terms of reference, which were submitted to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change Feb. 8.

Jones said one option is similar to the shelved plans, proposing to put waste in a 17.6-hectare area by Green Mountain Road presently approved for clean fill and raise the site’s height by an unspecified amount.

Taro’s original 1996 approvals allowed for a waste footprint of 59.1 hectares and height of 14.5 metres above grade.

That changed when Terrapure’s predecessor, Newalta Corp., got ministry approval in 2013 to shrink the site’s footprint by 17.6 hectares by Green Mountain Road in return for raising its height four metres.

The “reconfiguration”, as it was dubbed, led the city in 2015 to remove 90 planned maisonette townhomes to the north from a no-build zone because they no longer fell within a 160 metres of waste limits.

Three of the new options retain the clean-fill section, but only by either raising the site’s height or expanding the waste footprint to within 30 metres of Mud Street and into new areas along Upper Centennial Parkway and at the northwest corner.

The larger footprint would move the dump closer to Penny Lane Estates to the south and a public elementary school planned near the northwest corner.

Three options go back to the pre-2013 footprint, with one expanding into the new areas as well.

One suggestion from the city and others Terrapure didn’t consider is looking at options beyond the Taro site.

The company states doing so isn’t “affordable or realistic” because it can’t expropriate land.

The new options can be viewed at www.terrapurestoneycreek.com/document-library/ or at the ministry’s Hamilton office, located on the 9th floor of the Ellen Fairclough Building, 119 King St. W.

Written comments should be submitted by March 10 to Gavin Battarino, the ministry’s special project officer, by mail or at gavin.battarino@ontario.ca.


New Taro dump options aim higher, wider or both

Expansion eyed toward Penny Lane Estates, future school

Community Feb 16, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The owner of the Taro industrial dump is offering six new potential ways to meet its goal of increasing the site’s capacity — including two that pile waste closer to neighbouring homes, businesses and a future elementary school.

Terrapure Environmental's revised terms of reference for an environmental assessment on its expansion bid scrap two original options from last June that proposed to raise the upper Stoney Creek dump’s height by three to four metres.

The six new options all still seek to increase Taro’s waste capacity to 10 million cubic metres, up from the existing limit of 6.32 million, but do so by either raising the site’s height, expanding its approved footprint or both.

Terrapure doesn’t quantify how much the new “alternative methods” will alter the dump’s height or footprint, unlike on the original proposals, which were opposed by a community liaison committee for the site and the area’s councillor, Doug Conley.

“No specific details have been developed yet because that would happen during the (environmental assessment) phase."

Greg Jones, the company’s communications director, said the new options reflect feedback from the public, city and provincial regulators, and are “intended to be conceptual”.

“It’s as far as we’ve taken things at this point,” he said. “No specific details have been developed yet because that would happen during the (environmental assessment) phase if the terms of reference are approved.”

The public is being given until March 10 to comment on the revised terms of reference, which were submitted to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change Feb. 8.

Jones said one option is similar to the shelved plans, proposing to put waste in a 17.6-hectare area by Green Mountain Road presently approved for clean fill and raise the site’s height by an unspecified amount.

Taro’s original 1996 approvals allowed for a waste footprint of 59.1 hectares and height of 14.5 metres above grade.

That changed when Terrapure’s predecessor, Newalta Corp., got ministry approval in 2013 to shrink the site’s footprint by 17.6 hectares by Green Mountain Road in return for raising its height four metres.

The “reconfiguration”, as it was dubbed, led the city in 2015 to remove 90 planned maisonette townhomes to the north from a no-build zone because they no longer fell within a 160 metres of waste limits.

Three of the new options retain the clean-fill section, but only by either raising the site’s height or expanding the waste footprint to within 30 metres of Mud Street and into new areas along Upper Centennial Parkway and at the northwest corner.

The larger footprint would move the dump closer to Penny Lane Estates to the south and a public elementary school planned near the northwest corner.

Three options go back to the pre-2013 footprint, with one expanding into the new areas as well.

One suggestion from the city and others Terrapure didn’t consider is looking at options beyond the Taro site.

The company states doing so isn’t “affordable or realistic” because it can’t expropriate land.

The new options can be viewed at www.terrapurestoneycreek.com/document-library/ or at the ministry’s Hamilton office, located on the 9th floor of the Ellen Fairclough Building, 119 King St. W.

Written comments should be submitted by March 10 to Gavin Battarino, the ministry’s special project officer, by mail or at gavin.battarino@ontario.ca.


New Taro dump options aim higher, wider or both

Expansion eyed toward Penny Lane Estates, future school

Community Feb 16, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The owner of the Taro industrial dump is offering six new potential ways to meet its goal of increasing the site’s capacity — including two that pile waste closer to neighbouring homes, businesses and a future elementary school.

Terrapure Environmental's revised terms of reference for an environmental assessment on its expansion bid scrap two original options from last June that proposed to raise the upper Stoney Creek dump’s height by three to four metres.

The six new options all still seek to increase Taro’s waste capacity to 10 million cubic metres, up from the existing limit of 6.32 million, but do so by either raising the site’s height, expanding its approved footprint or both.

Terrapure doesn’t quantify how much the new “alternative methods” will alter the dump’s height or footprint, unlike on the original proposals, which were opposed by a community liaison committee for the site and the area’s councillor, Doug Conley.

“No specific details have been developed yet because that would happen during the (environmental assessment) phase."

Greg Jones, the company’s communications director, said the new options reflect feedback from the public, city and provincial regulators, and are “intended to be conceptual”.

“It’s as far as we’ve taken things at this point,” he said. “No specific details have been developed yet because that would happen during the (environmental assessment) phase if the terms of reference are approved.”

The public is being given until March 10 to comment on the revised terms of reference, which were submitted to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change Feb. 8.

Jones said one option is similar to the shelved plans, proposing to put waste in a 17.6-hectare area by Green Mountain Road presently approved for clean fill and raise the site’s height by an unspecified amount.

Taro’s original 1996 approvals allowed for a waste footprint of 59.1 hectares and height of 14.5 metres above grade.

That changed when Terrapure’s predecessor, Newalta Corp., got ministry approval in 2013 to shrink the site’s footprint by 17.6 hectares by Green Mountain Road in return for raising its height four metres.

The “reconfiguration”, as it was dubbed, led the city in 2015 to remove 90 planned maisonette townhomes to the north from a no-build zone because they no longer fell within a 160 metres of waste limits.

Three of the new options retain the clean-fill section, but only by either raising the site’s height or expanding the waste footprint to within 30 metres of Mud Street and into new areas along Upper Centennial Parkway and at the northwest corner.

The larger footprint would move the dump closer to Penny Lane Estates to the south and a public elementary school planned near the northwest corner.

Three options go back to the pre-2013 footprint, with one expanding into the new areas as well.

One suggestion from the city and others Terrapure didn’t consider is looking at options beyond the Taro site.

The company states doing so isn’t “affordable or realistic” because it can’t expropriate land.

The new options can be viewed at www.terrapurestoneycreek.com/document-library/ or at the ministry’s Hamilton office, located on the 9th floor of the Ellen Fairclough Building, 119 King St. W.

Written comments should be submitted by March 10 to Gavin Battarino, the ministry’s special project officer, by mail or at gavin.battarino@ontario.ca.