Terrapure boosts expansion options for Taro dump

Community Jan 12, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The proposed expansion of upper Stoney Creek’s Taro industrial dump will consider an additional four ways to meet that goal.

Owner Terrapure Environmental Inc. says it increased an original two options to six in response to public and city input on draft terms of reference for an environmental assessment released last summer.

Communications director Greg Jones said although the company is still finalizing the four new options, they address concerns about the site’s height and potential expansion toward new housing surveys north of Green Mountain Road.

“We’ve had some good feedback that we’ve had the opportunity to think about and make some adjustments. It’s reflective of the process working as it’s intended to,” he said.

“We put things out there and we engage and consult and get feedback and adjust, and that’s exactly what we’ve done.”

Terrapure is seeking to boost the dump’s capacity to 10 million cubic metres from an existing limit of 6.32 million.

The original two options proposed to place waste in an area by Green Mountain Road set aside for clean fill when previous owner Newalta got approval in 2013 to shrink the dump’s footprint in return for raising its height by four metres.

The two options raise the site’s height by another three to four metres, potentially setting a new maximum of 22.5 metres above grade.

That’s up from the original limit of 14.5 metres set by original approvals in 1996, which also included a cap of 10 million tonnes, removed without public notice by the province in November 2005.

Jones said Terrapure hopes to submit the final terms of reference for the environmental assessment on the expansion bid to the province in the coming weeks.

The public will then have another chance to comment on them before they are approved by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change.

Other key changes to the terms of reference since last summer include broadening the study area for the expansion’s environmental impacts to all lands within 1.5 kilometres of the dump.

Terrapure originally proposed to include lands within at least 500 metres and, in some cases, up to 1.5 kilometres.

Jones said the uniform study area will make the environmental assessment more consistent and comprehensive across the board.

Terrapure is also committing to increase notice of public consultation events during the environmental assessment, including through mobile signs and robo-calls.


Terrapure boosts expansion options for Taro dump

Proposed upper Stoney Creek EA to study six footprints

Community Jan 12, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The proposed expansion of upper Stoney Creek’s Taro industrial dump will consider an additional four ways to meet that goal.

Owner Terrapure Environmental Inc. says it increased an original two options to six in response to public and city input on draft terms of reference for an environmental assessment released last summer.

Communications director Greg Jones said although the company is still finalizing the four new options, they address concerns about the site’s height and potential expansion toward new housing surveys north of Green Mountain Road.

“We’ve had some good feedback that we’ve had the opportunity to think about and make some adjustments. It’s reflective of the process working as it’s intended to,” he said.

“We’ve had some good feedback that we’ve had the opportunity to think about and make some adjustments."

“We put things out there and we engage and consult and get feedback and adjust, and that’s exactly what we’ve done.”

Terrapure is seeking to boost the dump’s capacity to 10 million cubic metres from an existing limit of 6.32 million.

The original two options proposed to place waste in an area by Green Mountain Road set aside for clean fill when previous owner Newalta got approval in 2013 to shrink the dump’s footprint in return for raising its height by four metres.

The two options raise the site’s height by another three to four metres, potentially setting a new maximum of 22.5 metres above grade.

That’s up from the original limit of 14.5 metres set by original approvals in 1996, which also included a cap of 10 million tonnes, removed without public notice by the province in November 2005.

Jones said Terrapure hopes to submit the final terms of reference for the environmental assessment on the expansion bid to the province in the coming weeks.

The public will then have another chance to comment on them before they are approved by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change.

Other key changes to the terms of reference since last summer include broadening the study area for the expansion’s environmental impacts to all lands within 1.5 kilometres of the dump.

Terrapure originally proposed to include lands within at least 500 metres and, in some cases, up to 1.5 kilometres.

Jones said the uniform study area will make the environmental assessment more consistent and comprehensive across the board.

Terrapure is also committing to increase notice of public consultation events during the environmental assessment, including through mobile signs and robo-calls.


Terrapure boosts expansion options for Taro dump

Proposed upper Stoney Creek EA to study six footprints

Community Jan 12, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The proposed expansion of upper Stoney Creek’s Taro industrial dump will consider an additional four ways to meet that goal.

Owner Terrapure Environmental Inc. says it increased an original two options to six in response to public and city input on draft terms of reference for an environmental assessment released last summer.

Communications director Greg Jones said although the company is still finalizing the four new options, they address concerns about the site’s height and potential expansion toward new housing surveys north of Green Mountain Road.

“We’ve had some good feedback that we’ve had the opportunity to think about and make some adjustments. It’s reflective of the process working as it’s intended to,” he said.

“We’ve had some good feedback that we’ve had the opportunity to think about and make some adjustments."

“We put things out there and we engage and consult and get feedback and adjust, and that’s exactly what we’ve done.”

Terrapure is seeking to boost the dump’s capacity to 10 million cubic metres from an existing limit of 6.32 million.

The original two options proposed to place waste in an area by Green Mountain Road set aside for clean fill when previous owner Newalta got approval in 2013 to shrink the dump’s footprint in return for raising its height by four metres.

The two options raise the site’s height by another three to four metres, potentially setting a new maximum of 22.5 metres above grade.

That’s up from the original limit of 14.5 metres set by original approvals in 1996, which also included a cap of 10 million tonnes, removed without public notice by the province in November 2005.

Jones said Terrapure hopes to submit the final terms of reference for the environmental assessment on the expansion bid to the province in the coming weeks.

The public will then have another chance to comment on them before they are approved by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change.

Other key changes to the terms of reference since last summer include broadening the study area for the expansion’s environmental impacts to all lands within 1.5 kilometres of the dump.

Terrapure originally proposed to include lands within at least 500 metres and, in some cases, up to 1.5 kilometres.

Jones said the uniform study area will make the environmental assessment more consistent and comprehensive across the board.

Terrapure is also committing to increase notice of public consultation events during the environmental assessment, including through mobile signs and robo-calls.