Dundas Youth Soccer Club merges with Flamborough club

Community Dec 21, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Eight years after reorganizing to provide both girls and boys soccer programs, the Dundas Youth Soccer Club has merged with the Flamborough Soccer Club.

The two minor soccer clubs are taking what is becoming a common route to revitalizing and strengthening youth sports programs. The Saltfleet-Stoney Creek Soccer Club formed two years ago with a merger of two youth programs, while the Dundas and Ancaster minor hockey programs voted earlier this week on a proposed merger. (See sidebar for the latest.)

“We’re not reinventing the wheel,” said Dundas club president Troy Thompson. “We’re two strong clubs that will be better together.”

While Thompson and Flamborough club president Rick Henry, suggested their club’s registration numbers have “plateaued”. And as with most minor sports, maintaining interest in older youth is a challenge, as is noticeable drops in the number of children in the community.

According to registration numbers reported to the city by the minor sports organizations themselves, numbers in Dundas youth soccer have dropped each year since 2012: from 1,300 to 1,215, to 1,112 and 1,025 in 2015. Flamborough soccer has seen a similar drop, from 1,600 in 2012 to 1,341 in 2015.

Dundas minor hockey registration has dropped from 602 in 2013-2014 to 563 in 2016, while Ancaster minor hockey dropped from 1,000 in 2012 to 923 in 2016.

An update to the City of Hamilton’s indoor recreation facilities master plan stated youth minor hockey registration across the city has declined by 4 per cent since 2012/13 and 16 per cent since 2004/05.

“During these time periods, the City-wide population of 5 to 19 year olds has declined, while the City’s overall population grew modestly. It would appear that the erosion in youth participation can be partially attributed to an aging population, although there are likely other factors at play,” the report stated.

Minor hockey registration in Hamilton has declined from 11,045 in 2005 to 8,456 in 2016.

According to the city’s demographic profile of Dundas (Ward 13) – using city statistics and the 2011 census, Dundas has a lower percentage of residents under the age of 19 than the rest of Hamilton, and its youth population has declined for several years.

The number of children under the age of four dropped from 1,085 to 1,035 from 2006 to 2011. Children aged five through nine dropped from 1,335 to 1,210.

“Given that the City’s youth population remains in decline, it is reasonable to expect that minor hockey and figure skating will find it challenging to maintain current registration levels within the local youth market,” the indoor recreation master plan states. “All of this suggests that there will be fewer children and youth participating inice sports over at least the short-term, despite an overall growth projected in the City’s population.”

No similar assessment for city-wide minor soccer was available.

Steve Aglor, a longtime minor and junior hockey volunteer in Dundas, said he was originally against any merger that would see Dundas Minor Hockey disappear.

“But listening to the way the numbers are dropping in registration and the cost of a kid to play minor hockey now, I think if it doesn’t happen now it will eventually have to happen,” Aglor said.

He felt the process seemed to be happening too quickly, without enough time to get information out to people, so they can see the benefits of a merger.

Aglor would like to see the two centres try an interlock system of all house league players in Ancaster and Dundas.

“I think once the members of both associations see how good it could work, the chances of (the merger) going through would be better,” Aglor said.

During an interview at the Flamborough-Dundas Soccer Club’s office at 50 Dundas St. E. in Flamborough– which they pointed out has a Dundas mailing address – Henry and Thompson stressed their individual organizations didn’t amalgamate due to problems, or threats of demise.

“We both believe being larger will be beneficial,” Thompson said.

They estimated the new amalgamated soccer club will have close to 2,500 members.

Thompson suggested mergers and amalgamations are becoming a fact of life for smaller youth sport organizations – that make life easier and more predictable into the future. He said smaller clubs have a tougher time getting volunteer coaches, and board members.

“It puts a lot of strain on individuals,” Thompson said.

Henry said having twice as many volunteers and twice as many board members provides benefits – including original ideas and new excitement.

“We’ll learn from each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and experiences,” he said. “After a while you lose that spark. I think that’s true for anybody.”

The two associations had already worked together successfully for at least five years with interlock play, adding more age groups into the mix over time. They’ve also previously shared fields.

In a notice to members of the two clubs last week, Dundas and Flamborough minor soccer executives confirmed a combined board of directors will now oversee operations and registration for 2017, until general meetings are held next November to elect one board of directors for the new club.

“The Flambrough-Dundas Soccer Club will be operating as a new club effective immediately and it will be business as usual,” the notice states.

Dundas Youth Soccer Club merges with Flamborough club

Community Dec 21, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Eight years after reorganizing to provide both girls and boys soccer programs, the Dundas Youth Soccer Club has merged with the Flamborough Soccer Club.

The two minor soccer clubs are taking what is becoming a common route to revitalizing and strengthening youth sports programs. The Saltfleet-Stoney Creek Soccer Club formed two years ago with a merger of two youth programs, while the Dundas and Ancaster minor hockey programs voted earlier this week on a proposed merger. (See sidebar for the latest.)

“We’re not reinventing the wheel,” said Dundas club president Troy Thompson. “We’re two strong clubs that will be better together.”

While Thompson and Flamborough club president Rick Henry, suggested their club’s registration numbers have “plateaued”. And as with most minor sports, maintaining interest in older youth is a challenge, as is noticeable drops in the number of children in the community.

According to registration numbers reported to the city by the minor sports organizations themselves, numbers in Dundas youth soccer have dropped each year since 2012: from 1,300 to 1,215, to 1,112 and 1,025 in 2015. Flamborough soccer has seen a similar drop, from 1,600 in 2012 to 1,341 in 2015.

Dundas minor hockey registration has dropped from 602 in 2013-2014 to 563 in 2016, while Ancaster minor hockey dropped from 1,000 in 2012 to 923 in 2016.

An update to the City of Hamilton’s indoor recreation facilities master plan stated youth minor hockey registration across the city has declined by 4 per cent since 2012/13 and 16 per cent since 2004/05.

“During these time periods, the City-wide population of 5 to 19 year olds has declined, while the City’s overall population grew modestly. It would appear that the erosion in youth participation can be partially attributed to an aging population, although there are likely other factors at play,” the report stated.

Minor hockey registration in Hamilton has declined from 11,045 in 2005 to 8,456 in 2016.

According to the city’s demographic profile of Dundas (Ward 13) – using city statistics and the 2011 census, Dundas has a lower percentage of residents under the age of 19 than the rest of Hamilton, and its youth population has declined for several years.

The number of children under the age of four dropped from 1,085 to 1,035 from 2006 to 2011. Children aged five through nine dropped from 1,335 to 1,210.

“Given that the City’s youth population remains in decline, it is reasonable to expect that minor hockey and figure skating will find it challenging to maintain current registration levels within the local youth market,” the indoor recreation master plan states. “All of this suggests that there will be fewer children and youth participating inice sports over at least the short-term, despite an overall growth projected in the City’s population.”

No similar assessment for city-wide minor soccer was available.

Steve Aglor, a longtime minor and junior hockey volunteer in Dundas, said he was originally against any merger that would see Dundas Minor Hockey disappear.

“But listening to the way the numbers are dropping in registration and the cost of a kid to play minor hockey now, I think if it doesn’t happen now it will eventually have to happen,” Aglor said.

He felt the process seemed to be happening too quickly, without enough time to get information out to people, so they can see the benefits of a merger.

Aglor would like to see the two centres try an interlock system of all house league players in Ancaster and Dundas.

“I think once the members of both associations see how good it could work, the chances of (the merger) going through would be better,” Aglor said.

During an interview at the Flamborough-Dundas Soccer Club’s office at 50 Dundas St. E. in Flamborough– which they pointed out has a Dundas mailing address – Henry and Thompson stressed their individual organizations didn’t amalgamate due to problems, or threats of demise.

“We both believe being larger will be beneficial,” Thompson said.

They estimated the new amalgamated soccer club will have close to 2,500 members.

Thompson suggested mergers and amalgamations are becoming a fact of life for smaller youth sport organizations – that make life easier and more predictable into the future. He said smaller clubs have a tougher time getting volunteer coaches, and board members.

“It puts a lot of strain on individuals,” Thompson said.

Henry said having twice as many volunteers and twice as many board members provides benefits – including original ideas and new excitement.

“We’ll learn from each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and experiences,” he said. “After a while you lose that spark. I think that’s true for anybody.”

The two associations had already worked together successfully for at least five years with interlock play, adding more age groups into the mix over time. They’ve also previously shared fields.

In a notice to members of the two clubs last week, Dundas and Flamborough minor soccer executives confirmed a combined board of directors will now oversee operations and registration for 2017, until general meetings are held next November to elect one board of directors for the new club.

“The Flambrough-Dundas Soccer Club will be operating as a new club effective immediately and it will be business as usual,” the notice states.

Dundas Youth Soccer Club merges with Flamborough club

Community Dec 21, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Eight years after reorganizing to provide both girls and boys soccer programs, the Dundas Youth Soccer Club has merged with the Flamborough Soccer Club.

The two minor soccer clubs are taking what is becoming a common route to revitalizing and strengthening youth sports programs. The Saltfleet-Stoney Creek Soccer Club formed two years ago with a merger of two youth programs, while the Dundas and Ancaster minor hockey programs voted earlier this week on a proposed merger. (See sidebar for the latest.)

“We’re not reinventing the wheel,” said Dundas club president Troy Thompson. “We’re two strong clubs that will be better together.”

While Thompson and Flamborough club president Rick Henry, suggested their club’s registration numbers have “plateaued”. And as with most minor sports, maintaining interest in older youth is a challenge, as is noticeable drops in the number of children in the community.

According to registration numbers reported to the city by the minor sports organizations themselves, numbers in Dundas youth soccer have dropped each year since 2012: from 1,300 to 1,215, to 1,112 and 1,025 in 2015. Flamborough soccer has seen a similar drop, from 1,600 in 2012 to 1,341 in 2015.

Dundas minor hockey registration has dropped from 602 in 2013-2014 to 563 in 2016, while Ancaster minor hockey dropped from 1,000 in 2012 to 923 in 2016.

An update to the City of Hamilton’s indoor recreation facilities master plan stated youth minor hockey registration across the city has declined by 4 per cent since 2012/13 and 16 per cent since 2004/05.

“During these time periods, the City-wide population of 5 to 19 year olds has declined, while the City’s overall population grew modestly. It would appear that the erosion in youth participation can be partially attributed to an aging population, although there are likely other factors at play,” the report stated.

Minor hockey registration in Hamilton has declined from 11,045 in 2005 to 8,456 in 2016.

According to the city’s demographic profile of Dundas (Ward 13) – using city statistics and the 2011 census, Dundas has a lower percentage of residents under the age of 19 than the rest of Hamilton, and its youth population has declined for several years.

The number of children under the age of four dropped from 1,085 to 1,035 from 2006 to 2011. Children aged five through nine dropped from 1,335 to 1,210.

“Given that the City’s youth population remains in decline, it is reasonable to expect that minor hockey and figure skating will find it challenging to maintain current registration levels within the local youth market,” the indoor recreation master plan states. “All of this suggests that there will be fewer children and youth participating inice sports over at least the short-term, despite an overall growth projected in the City’s population.”

No similar assessment for city-wide minor soccer was available.

Steve Aglor, a longtime minor and junior hockey volunteer in Dundas, said he was originally against any merger that would see Dundas Minor Hockey disappear.

“But listening to the way the numbers are dropping in registration and the cost of a kid to play minor hockey now, I think if it doesn’t happen now it will eventually have to happen,” Aglor said.

He felt the process seemed to be happening too quickly, without enough time to get information out to people, so they can see the benefits of a merger.

Aglor would like to see the two centres try an interlock system of all house league players in Ancaster and Dundas.

“I think once the members of both associations see how good it could work, the chances of (the merger) going through would be better,” Aglor said.

During an interview at the Flamborough-Dundas Soccer Club’s office at 50 Dundas St. E. in Flamborough– which they pointed out has a Dundas mailing address – Henry and Thompson stressed their individual organizations didn’t amalgamate due to problems, or threats of demise.

“We both believe being larger will be beneficial,” Thompson said.

They estimated the new amalgamated soccer club will have close to 2,500 members.

Thompson suggested mergers and amalgamations are becoming a fact of life for smaller youth sport organizations – that make life easier and more predictable into the future. He said smaller clubs have a tougher time getting volunteer coaches, and board members.

“It puts a lot of strain on individuals,” Thompson said.

Henry said having twice as many volunteers and twice as many board members provides benefits – including original ideas and new excitement.

“We’ll learn from each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and experiences,” he said. “After a while you lose that spark. I think that’s true for anybody.”

The two associations had already worked together successfully for at least five years with interlock play, adding more age groups into the mix over time. They’ve also previously shared fields.

In a notice to members of the two clubs last week, Dundas and Flamborough minor soccer executives confirmed a combined board of directors will now oversee operations and registration for 2017, until general meetings are held next November to elect one board of directors for the new club.

“The Flambrough-Dundas Soccer Club will be operating as a new club effective immediately and it will be business as usual,” the notice states.