Stoney Creek mom uses mind-body medicine to treat autism, post-traumatic stress

Community Nov 18, 2015 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

With just a few treatments, Nicole Saddler started to see a difference in her autistic son, Matthew.

The emotional outbursts, triggered by the rain, disappeared. So did the shock of taking the bus to a new and unfamiliar school.

“He is more confident, focused and doesn’t have obsessive behaviours,” said Saddler, a Stoney Creek resident.

After seeing her 14-year-old son struggle in school and in certain social situations, Saddler turned not to medication, but to Access Consciousness, an energy modality. Treatment sessions, also called the Bars, involve a practitioner applying gentle pressure to 32 points, or “energetic bars”, that run around the head. Those pressure points are believed to reflect different aspects of a person’s life that are the stores electromagnetic components of all of the thoughts, ideas, decisions and beliefs a person has ever had.

Some of the pressure points are believed to relate to joy and sadness, others to power and money, gratitude, creativity and more.

Saddler, an occasional teacher with the District School Board of Niagara, believes so strongly in Access Consciousness she became a Bars practitioner herself after taking a weekend-long course.

She provides Matthew’s treatments herself and also offers the service to a small group of clients in her home.

Saddler said the treatment is effective for posttraumatic stress, by clearing the emotional “looping” of a traumatic event in a patient’s subconscious.

“It begins to gradually let go. You’re clearing it,” she said.

Saddler’s sessions last 45 minutes to an hour and include a physical, emotional and verbal component.

When one of the pressure points is hot, or vibrating, it’s a sign that something is imbalanced and clearing.

Saddler said there are various reasons why the pressure points can be out of balance, such as marital or workplace stress.

“It affects you whether you want it to or not,” she said.

Saddler, who still receives the therapy herself, said the treatment helps her relate to her students.

“I’m calm. I don’t judge. If (students) are frustrated, I figure out what can be done.”

Saddler first learned about the Bars from Dr. Nancy Abram, a general practice psychotherapist who started seeing her son.

Dr. Abram retired from her family practice in 2011 to work in the area of mind-body medicine and energy psychology.

Abram uses tools like the Bars and the Emotional Freedom Technique, also called EFT, along with traditional psychodynamic methods in her Grimsby-based practice.

“When I started adding the Bars, people had dramatic results. They started getting over their issues a lot faster,” she said.

Abram said the Bars can be an effective adjunctive treatment for depression, anxiety and psychosocial issues related to emotional trauma.

“It helps to clear the thoughts, emotions and feelings energetically,” she said.

While many patients may be unfamiliar with the treatment, Abram said Access Consciousness is gaining greater recognition. Some research has been done that demonstrates a change in brain wave patterns after a session of the Bars that is similar with those who are experienced with deep meditation techniques.

Abram has attended classes where many of the participants are also practicing physicians or PhD psychotherapists.

While Access Consciousness may not be a household term in Canada just yet, Abram said the process of “running the Bars” and other Access tools are more prevalent in Europe, the U.S. and Australia.

“I don’t think enough people (in Canada) even know about it yet,” said Abram.

Virtually anyone, said Abram, from children to adults, can learn the Bars and run them on friends and family as a relaxation technique with other potential benefits.

“If more people learn how to use this modality it would be fantastic,” she said.

Laurie Mawlam, executive director of Autism Canada, hadn’t heard of Access Consciousness when questioned by a reporter. But as long as the treatments are non-invasive, Mawlam said parents should be free to decide if the technique is right for their children.

“I’m not familiar with it. But if it’s non-invasive, parents should be free to make their own decisions based on their research and belief systems,” said Mawlam.

Gary Douglas and co-creator Dr. Dain Heer founded Access Consciousness in 1990 in San Diego, Calif.. Bars practitioners and facilitators can be found in more than 100 countries. Listings are available at accessconsciousness.com. Saddler can be contacted by email at getbars@outlook.com.

Stoney Creek mom uses mind-body medicine to treat autism, post-traumatic stress

Community Nov 18, 2015 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

With just a few treatments, Nicole Saddler started to see a difference in her autistic son, Matthew.

The emotional outbursts, triggered by the rain, disappeared. So did the shock of taking the bus to a new and unfamiliar school.

“He is more confident, focused and doesn’t have obsessive behaviours,” said Saddler, a Stoney Creek resident.

After seeing her 14-year-old son struggle in school and in certain social situations, Saddler turned not to medication, but to Access Consciousness, an energy modality. Treatment sessions, also called the Bars, involve a practitioner applying gentle pressure to 32 points, or “energetic bars”, that run around the head. Those pressure points are believed to reflect different aspects of a person’s life that are the stores electromagnetic components of all of the thoughts, ideas, decisions and beliefs a person has ever had.

Some of the pressure points are believed to relate to joy and sadness, others to power and money, gratitude, creativity and more.

Saddler, an occasional teacher with the District School Board of Niagara, believes so strongly in Access Consciousness she became a Bars practitioner herself after taking a weekend-long course.

She provides Matthew’s treatments herself and also offers the service to a small group of clients in her home.

Saddler said the treatment is effective for posttraumatic stress, by clearing the emotional “looping” of a traumatic event in a patient’s subconscious.

“It begins to gradually let go. You’re clearing it,” she said.

Saddler’s sessions last 45 minutes to an hour and include a physical, emotional and verbal component.

When one of the pressure points is hot, or vibrating, it’s a sign that something is imbalanced and clearing.

Saddler said there are various reasons why the pressure points can be out of balance, such as marital or workplace stress.

“It affects you whether you want it to or not,” she said.

Saddler, who still receives the therapy herself, said the treatment helps her relate to her students.

“I’m calm. I don’t judge. If (students) are frustrated, I figure out what can be done.”

Saddler first learned about the Bars from Dr. Nancy Abram, a general practice psychotherapist who started seeing her son.

Dr. Abram retired from her family practice in 2011 to work in the area of mind-body medicine and energy psychology.

Abram uses tools like the Bars and the Emotional Freedom Technique, also called EFT, along with traditional psychodynamic methods in her Grimsby-based practice.

“When I started adding the Bars, people had dramatic results. They started getting over their issues a lot faster,” she said.

Abram said the Bars can be an effective adjunctive treatment for depression, anxiety and psychosocial issues related to emotional trauma.

“It helps to clear the thoughts, emotions and feelings energetically,” she said.

While many patients may be unfamiliar with the treatment, Abram said Access Consciousness is gaining greater recognition. Some research has been done that demonstrates a change in brain wave patterns after a session of the Bars that is similar with those who are experienced with deep meditation techniques.

Abram has attended classes where many of the participants are also practicing physicians or PhD psychotherapists.

While Access Consciousness may not be a household term in Canada just yet, Abram said the process of “running the Bars” and other Access tools are more prevalent in Europe, the U.S. and Australia.

“I don’t think enough people (in Canada) even know about it yet,” said Abram.

Virtually anyone, said Abram, from children to adults, can learn the Bars and run them on friends and family as a relaxation technique with other potential benefits.

“If more people learn how to use this modality it would be fantastic,” she said.

Laurie Mawlam, executive director of Autism Canada, hadn’t heard of Access Consciousness when questioned by a reporter. But as long as the treatments are non-invasive, Mawlam said parents should be free to decide if the technique is right for their children.

“I’m not familiar with it. But if it’s non-invasive, parents should be free to make their own decisions based on their research and belief systems,” said Mawlam.

Gary Douglas and co-creator Dr. Dain Heer founded Access Consciousness in 1990 in San Diego, Calif.. Bars practitioners and facilitators can be found in more than 100 countries. Listings are available at accessconsciousness.com. Saddler can be contacted by email at getbars@outlook.com.

Stoney Creek mom uses mind-body medicine to treat autism, post-traumatic stress

Community Nov 18, 2015 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

With just a few treatments, Nicole Saddler started to see a difference in her autistic son, Matthew.

The emotional outbursts, triggered by the rain, disappeared. So did the shock of taking the bus to a new and unfamiliar school.

“He is more confident, focused and doesn’t have obsessive behaviours,” said Saddler, a Stoney Creek resident.

After seeing her 14-year-old son struggle in school and in certain social situations, Saddler turned not to medication, but to Access Consciousness, an energy modality. Treatment sessions, also called the Bars, involve a practitioner applying gentle pressure to 32 points, or “energetic bars”, that run around the head. Those pressure points are believed to reflect different aspects of a person’s life that are the stores electromagnetic components of all of the thoughts, ideas, decisions and beliefs a person has ever had.

Some of the pressure points are believed to relate to joy and sadness, others to power and money, gratitude, creativity and more.

Saddler, an occasional teacher with the District School Board of Niagara, believes so strongly in Access Consciousness she became a Bars practitioner herself after taking a weekend-long course.

She provides Matthew’s treatments herself and also offers the service to a small group of clients in her home.

Saddler said the treatment is effective for posttraumatic stress, by clearing the emotional “looping” of a traumatic event in a patient’s subconscious.

“It begins to gradually let go. You’re clearing it,” she said.

Saddler’s sessions last 45 minutes to an hour and include a physical, emotional and verbal component.

When one of the pressure points is hot, or vibrating, it’s a sign that something is imbalanced and clearing.

Saddler said there are various reasons why the pressure points can be out of balance, such as marital or workplace stress.

“It affects you whether you want it to or not,” she said.

Saddler, who still receives the therapy herself, said the treatment helps her relate to her students.

“I’m calm. I don’t judge. If (students) are frustrated, I figure out what can be done.”

Saddler first learned about the Bars from Dr. Nancy Abram, a general practice psychotherapist who started seeing her son.

Dr. Abram retired from her family practice in 2011 to work in the area of mind-body medicine and energy psychology.

Abram uses tools like the Bars and the Emotional Freedom Technique, also called EFT, along with traditional psychodynamic methods in her Grimsby-based practice.

“When I started adding the Bars, people had dramatic results. They started getting over their issues a lot faster,” she said.

Abram said the Bars can be an effective adjunctive treatment for depression, anxiety and psychosocial issues related to emotional trauma.

“It helps to clear the thoughts, emotions and feelings energetically,” she said.

While many patients may be unfamiliar with the treatment, Abram said Access Consciousness is gaining greater recognition. Some research has been done that demonstrates a change in brain wave patterns after a session of the Bars that is similar with those who are experienced with deep meditation techniques.

Abram has attended classes where many of the participants are also practicing physicians or PhD psychotherapists.

While Access Consciousness may not be a household term in Canada just yet, Abram said the process of “running the Bars” and other Access tools are more prevalent in Europe, the U.S. and Australia.

“I don’t think enough people (in Canada) even know about it yet,” said Abram.

Virtually anyone, said Abram, from children to adults, can learn the Bars and run them on friends and family as a relaxation technique with other potential benefits.

“If more people learn how to use this modality it would be fantastic,” she said.

Laurie Mawlam, executive director of Autism Canada, hadn’t heard of Access Consciousness when questioned by a reporter. But as long as the treatments are non-invasive, Mawlam said parents should be free to decide if the technique is right for their children.

“I’m not familiar with it. But if it’s non-invasive, parents should be free to make their own decisions based on their research and belief systems,” said Mawlam.

Gary Douglas and co-creator Dr. Dain Heer founded Access Consciousness in 1990 in San Diego, Calif.. Bars practitioners and facilitators can be found in more than 100 countries. Listings are available at accessconsciousness.com. Saddler can be contacted by email at getbars@outlook.com.