Dundas’ Ian and Marysia Donnelly lend a hand in Jamaica through Cuso International

Community Oct 01, 2015 by Debra Downey Dundas Star News

Some people retire to play golf; Ian and Marysia Donnelly lend their skills to developing nations.

After three previous trips to Third World countries in the past six years, the Donnellys are packing their bags once again for a 12-month placement in Kingston, Jamaica.

Through the efforts of Cuso International, Ian, 71, will be working in the micro-finance industry, while Marysia, 70, is exploring volunteer opportunities through the Jamaican Red Cross and a couple of orphanages.

The Donnellys don’t quite know exactly what to expect in Jamaica, but they are sure of two things.

“It’s always completely different than what you expect,” said Ian. “And finding out where we are going to live, that (home)always requires a little bit of TLC.”

During their first assignment in Malawi in 2008, Marysia, a registered nurse with over 20 years of experience, was placed at a nursing school, while Ian, retired from a career in business development, volunteered as an advisor to a dairy farmers association. The pair also worked in Guyana from 2011-12 with an organization supporting people with disabilities, and in Grenada, helping out with industrial development and skills training.

“We enjoy it on several different levels,” said Ian of the couple’s travels. “It’s doing something different — we prefer this to going on a cruise, although a cruise is fine too — and then there’s the feeling you get for doing a job that helps others. And we like meeting the local people...people are really the same the world over; the vast majority want to see you succeed and succeed themselves.”

For Marysia, combining travel with making a difference in someone else’s life provides a sense of achievement and adventure.

“We really enjoy it. It’s what keeps us motivated and feeling younger, and I’m really not that very good at golf or bridge,” she said.

The couple leave Oct. 12 and will return to Canada to enjoy granddaughter Madeleine’s first Christmas and for two months in the summer before completing their placement in December 2016.

The Donnelly’s have been asked to undertake a $2,000 fundraising effort to sustain Cuso’s work in much-needed areas, and to help send more volunteers. To contribute, visit https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/FundraisingPage.aspx?RegistrationID=3124613.

Cuso International recruits professionals interested in using their skills overseas to make a contribution in the fight against global poverty. Since 1961, more than 15,000 Cuso volunteers have contributed in more than 70 countries in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific.

Dundas’ Ian and Marysia Donnelly lend a hand in Jamaica through Cuso International

Community Oct 01, 2015 by Debra Downey Dundas Star News

Some people retire to play golf; Ian and Marysia Donnelly lend their skills to developing nations.

After three previous trips to Third World countries in the past six years, the Donnellys are packing their bags once again for a 12-month placement in Kingston, Jamaica.

Through the efforts of Cuso International, Ian, 71, will be working in the micro-finance industry, while Marysia, 70, is exploring volunteer opportunities through the Jamaican Red Cross and a couple of orphanages.

The Donnellys don’t quite know exactly what to expect in Jamaica, but they are sure of two things.

“We really enjoy it. It’s what keeps us motivated and feeling younger, and I’m really not that very good at golf or bridge.”

“It’s always completely different than what you expect,” said Ian. “And finding out where we are going to live, that (home)always requires a little bit of TLC.”

During their first assignment in Malawi in 2008, Marysia, a registered nurse with over 20 years of experience, was placed at a nursing school, while Ian, retired from a career in business development, volunteered as an advisor to a dairy farmers association. The pair also worked in Guyana from 2011-12 with an organization supporting people with disabilities, and in Grenada, helping out with industrial development and skills training.

“We enjoy it on several different levels,” said Ian of the couple’s travels. “It’s doing something different — we prefer this to going on a cruise, although a cruise is fine too — and then there’s the feeling you get for doing a job that helps others. And we like meeting the local people...people are really the same the world over; the vast majority want to see you succeed and succeed themselves.”

For Marysia, combining travel with making a difference in someone else’s life provides a sense of achievement and adventure.

“We really enjoy it. It’s what keeps us motivated and feeling younger, and I’m really not that very good at golf or bridge,” she said.

The couple leave Oct. 12 and will return to Canada to enjoy granddaughter Madeleine’s first Christmas and for two months in the summer before completing their placement in December 2016.

The Donnelly’s have been asked to undertake a $2,000 fundraising effort to sustain Cuso’s work in much-needed areas, and to help send more volunteers. To contribute, visit https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/FundraisingPage.aspx?RegistrationID=3124613.

Cuso International recruits professionals interested in using their skills overseas to make a contribution in the fight against global poverty. Since 1961, more than 15,000 Cuso volunteers have contributed in more than 70 countries in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific.

Dundas’ Ian and Marysia Donnelly lend a hand in Jamaica through Cuso International

Community Oct 01, 2015 by Debra Downey Dundas Star News

Some people retire to play golf; Ian and Marysia Donnelly lend their skills to developing nations.

After three previous trips to Third World countries in the past six years, the Donnellys are packing their bags once again for a 12-month placement in Kingston, Jamaica.

Through the efforts of Cuso International, Ian, 71, will be working in the micro-finance industry, while Marysia, 70, is exploring volunteer opportunities through the Jamaican Red Cross and a couple of orphanages.

The Donnellys don’t quite know exactly what to expect in Jamaica, but they are sure of two things.

“We really enjoy it. It’s what keeps us motivated and feeling younger, and I’m really not that very good at golf or bridge.”

“It’s always completely different than what you expect,” said Ian. “And finding out where we are going to live, that (home)always requires a little bit of TLC.”

During their first assignment in Malawi in 2008, Marysia, a registered nurse with over 20 years of experience, was placed at a nursing school, while Ian, retired from a career in business development, volunteered as an advisor to a dairy farmers association. The pair also worked in Guyana from 2011-12 with an organization supporting people with disabilities, and in Grenada, helping out with industrial development and skills training.

“We enjoy it on several different levels,” said Ian of the couple’s travels. “It’s doing something different — we prefer this to going on a cruise, although a cruise is fine too — and then there’s the feeling you get for doing a job that helps others. And we like meeting the local people...people are really the same the world over; the vast majority want to see you succeed and succeed themselves.”

For Marysia, combining travel with making a difference in someone else’s life provides a sense of achievement and adventure.

“We really enjoy it. It’s what keeps us motivated and feeling younger, and I’m really not that very good at golf or bridge,” she said.

The couple leave Oct. 12 and will return to Canada to enjoy granddaughter Madeleine’s first Christmas and for two months in the summer before completing their placement in December 2016.

The Donnelly’s have been asked to undertake a $2,000 fundraising effort to sustain Cuso’s work in much-needed areas, and to help send more volunteers. To contribute, visit https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/FundraisingPage.aspx?RegistrationID=3124613.

Cuso International recruits professionals interested in using their skills overseas to make a contribution in the fight against global poverty. Since 1961, more than 15,000 Cuso volunteers have contributed in more than 70 countries in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific.