GROWING GREEN: Introducing near-black blooms into the garden

Community Jul 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

You’re probably thinking this must be about those dead plants sitting in pots that you still haven’t planted. Or perhaps it’s the wrought iron used to support vines or roses.

Nope. We’re talking living plants.

Using interesting leaf colours can move a garden from ordinary to extraordinary. It can act as a foil for other plants or take centre stage in your border.

And mixing black (near-black) blooms with white or yellow or pink can create a gorgeous mix that enhances the show.

It’s amazing how many plants will provide those deep colours. We can find them in shrubs, groundcovers, perennials, annuals and bulbs. Many plants in this list are relatively easy to find and definitely easy to grow.

Shrubs

‘Diablo’ Ninebark is a gorgeous shrub, producing white blooms tinged with pink and great fall colour. The black pussy willow produces catkins that you would swear were painted black while the Black Lace Elderberry provides lacy foliage, pretty blooms and is deer resistant.

Groundcovers

Bugleweed, wild ginger and Black Mondo grass are all small scale and work well as ground covers.  

Perennials

Bugbane (black cohosh/cimicifuga), hollyhock, columbine, ‘Ravenswing’ Cow Parsley, helleborus, heuchera , day lilies and sedums all come in shades of black and are fun to add to the perennial border.

Annuals

It’s a mixed bag for the annuals – we have leaves such as sweet potato vine, coleus and Alternathera as well as blooms from the viola and fruit from ‘Black Pearl’ ornamental pepper.  

Bulbs and Tubers

If the list above hasn’t tempted you then there is Elephant ears, callas and cannas, fritillaries and the chocolate cosmos. And who can forget 17th century tulip mania and the story of the black tulip by Alexandre Dumas.

I hope you’ll consider introducing a bit of drama in your garden with the introduction of black!

Growing Green is a regular feature prepared by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society. This week’s column was written by Marg Verbeek, treasurer of the society.

GROWING GREEN: Introducing near-black blooms into the garden

Community Jul 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

You’re probably thinking this must be about those dead plants sitting in pots that you still haven’t planted. Or perhaps it’s the wrought iron used to support vines or roses.

Nope. We’re talking living plants.

Using interesting leaf colours can move a garden from ordinary to extraordinary. It can act as a foil for other plants or take centre stage in your border.

And mixing black (near-black) blooms with white or yellow or pink can create a gorgeous mix that enhances the show.

It’s amazing how many plants will provide those deep colours. We can find them in shrubs, groundcovers, perennials, annuals and bulbs. Many plants in this list are relatively easy to find and definitely easy to grow.

Shrubs

‘Diablo’ Ninebark is a gorgeous shrub, producing white blooms tinged with pink and great fall colour. The black pussy willow produces catkins that you would swear were painted black while the Black Lace Elderberry provides lacy foliage, pretty blooms and is deer resistant.

Groundcovers

Bugleweed, wild ginger and Black Mondo grass are all small scale and work well as ground covers.  

Perennials

Bugbane (black cohosh/cimicifuga), hollyhock, columbine, ‘Ravenswing’ Cow Parsley, helleborus, heuchera , day lilies and sedums all come in shades of black and are fun to add to the perennial border.

Annuals

It’s a mixed bag for the annuals – we have leaves such as sweet potato vine, coleus and Alternathera as well as blooms from the viola and fruit from ‘Black Pearl’ ornamental pepper.  

Bulbs and Tubers

If the list above hasn’t tempted you then there is Elephant ears, callas and cannas, fritillaries and the chocolate cosmos. And who can forget 17th century tulip mania and the story of the black tulip by Alexandre Dumas.

I hope you’ll consider introducing a bit of drama in your garden with the introduction of black!

Growing Green is a regular feature prepared by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society. This week’s column was written by Marg Verbeek, treasurer of the society.

GROWING GREEN: Introducing near-black blooms into the garden

Community Jul 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

You’re probably thinking this must be about those dead plants sitting in pots that you still haven’t planted. Or perhaps it’s the wrought iron used to support vines or roses.

Nope. We’re talking living plants.

Using interesting leaf colours can move a garden from ordinary to extraordinary. It can act as a foil for other plants or take centre stage in your border.

And mixing black (near-black) blooms with white or yellow or pink can create a gorgeous mix that enhances the show.

It’s amazing how many plants will provide those deep colours. We can find them in shrubs, groundcovers, perennials, annuals and bulbs. Many plants in this list are relatively easy to find and definitely easy to grow.

Shrubs

‘Diablo’ Ninebark is a gorgeous shrub, producing white blooms tinged with pink and great fall colour. The black pussy willow produces catkins that you would swear were painted black while the Black Lace Elderberry provides lacy foliage, pretty blooms and is deer resistant.

Groundcovers

Bugleweed, wild ginger and Black Mondo grass are all small scale and work well as ground covers.  

Perennials

Bugbane (black cohosh/cimicifuga), hollyhock, columbine, ‘Ravenswing’ Cow Parsley, helleborus, heuchera , day lilies and sedums all come in shades of black and are fun to add to the perennial border.

Annuals

It’s a mixed bag for the annuals – we have leaves such as sweet potato vine, coleus and Alternathera as well as blooms from the viola and fruit from ‘Black Pearl’ ornamental pepper.  

Bulbs and Tubers

If the list above hasn’t tempted you then there is Elephant ears, callas and cannas, fritillaries and the chocolate cosmos. And who can forget 17th century tulip mania and the story of the black tulip by Alexandre Dumas.

I hope you’ll consider introducing a bit of drama in your garden with the introduction of black!

Growing Green is a regular feature prepared by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society. This week’s column was written by Marg Verbeek, treasurer of the society.