Christie Lake ponds’ rehabilitation taking shape

Community Jun 25, 2015 by Richard Leitner Dundas Star News

It will take more monitoring to fully gauge how the removal of the first two of seven man-made fishing ponds that feed into Christie Lake has affected its water quality, but initial results appear promising.

Hamilton Conservation Authority aquatic ecologist Lisa Jennings said the first phase of the project this past winter restored the two ponds to a more natural, meandering creek flow and removed barriers preventing fish from reaching the lake.

The project has not only created habitat for desirable fish like pike, as well as turtles, frogs, salamanders, bats and birds, she said, but lowered the temperature of the 275-metre section restored creek’s water by 3C.

That’s an encouraging sign because the ponds were susceptible to algae blooms and blamed for helping raise the lake’s temperature by 3.75C, making it attractive for undesirable carp and suckers, and harming the quality of water in Spencer Creek.

“Now we have cold, cold water coming into Christie Lake,” Jennings said in a presentation to the authority’s conservation advisory board.

The ponds were created in 1970 and each costs between $110,000 and $130,000 to rehabilitate, much of it for the removal of sediment, replacement of culverts and associated roadwork, she said.

Jennings said the next phase will rehabilitate two more ponds in December and January.

Winter is a good time for the project, she said, because frozen sediment is easier to work with and there is less impact on fish, birds, frogs and salamanders because they aren’t spawning or breeding.

Work earlier this year rescued about 800 fish in the two ponds, including lots of minnows and bass, but left behind carp because they’re invasive species, she said.

“They are part of the (former) pond, it’s just now they’re buried, so they’re providing nutrients into the soil,” Jennings said.

The project is being funded by the authority’s charity, the Hamilton Conservation Foundation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, TD Canada Friends of the Environment and an RBC Blue Water Project grant.

Christie Lake ponds’ rehabilitation taking shape

Community Jun 25, 2015 by Richard Leitner Dundas Star News

It will take more monitoring to fully gauge how the removal of the first two of seven man-made fishing ponds that feed into Christie Lake has affected its water quality, but initial results appear promising.

Hamilton Conservation Authority aquatic ecologist Lisa Jennings said the first phase of the project this past winter restored the two ponds to a more natural, meandering creek flow and removed barriers preventing fish from reaching the lake.

The project has not only created habitat for desirable fish like pike, as well as turtles, frogs, salamanders, bats and birds, she said, but lowered the temperature of the 275-metre section restored creek’s water by 3C.

That’s an encouraging sign because the ponds were susceptible to algae blooms and blamed for helping raise the lake’s temperature by 3.75C, making it attractive for undesirable carp and suckers, and harming the quality of water in Spencer Creek.

“Now we have cold, cold water coming into Christie Lake.”

“Now we have cold, cold water coming into Christie Lake,” Jennings said in a presentation to the authority’s conservation advisory board.

The ponds were created in 1970 and each costs between $110,000 and $130,000 to rehabilitate, much of it for the removal of sediment, replacement of culverts and associated roadwork, she said.

Jennings said the next phase will rehabilitate two more ponds in December and January.

Winter is a good time for the project, she said, because frozen sediment is easier to work with and there is less impact on fish, birds, frogs and salamanders because they aren’t spawning or breeding.

Work earlier this year rescued about 800 fish in the two ponds, including lots of minnows and bass, but left behind carp because they’re invasive species, she said.

“They are part of the (former) pond, it’s just now they’re buried, so they’re providing nutrients into the soil,” Jennings said.

The project is being funded by the authority’s charity, the Hamilton Conservation Foundation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, TD Canada Friends of the Environment and an RBC Blue Water Project grant.

Christie Lake ponds’ rehabilitation taking shape

Community Jun 25, 2015 by Richard Leitner Dundas Star News

It will take more monitoring to fully gauge how the removal of the first two of seven man-made fishing ponds that feed into Christie Lake has affected its water quality, but initial results appear promising.

Hamilton Conservation Authority aquatic ecologist Lisa Jennings said the first phase of the project this past winter restored the two ponds to a more natural, meandering creek flow and removed barriers preventing fish from reaching the lake.

The project has not only created habitat for desirable fish like pike, as well as turtles, frogs, salamanders, bats and birds, she said, but lowered the temperature of the 275-metre section restored creek’s water by 3C.

That’s an encouraging sign because the ponds were susceptible to algae blooms and blamed for helping raise the lake’s temperature by 3.75C, making it attractive for undesirable carp and suckers, and harming the quality of water in Spencer Creek.

“Now we have cold, cold water coming into Christie Lake.”

“Now we have cold, cold water coming into Christie Lake,” Jennings said in a presentation to the authority’s conservation advisory board.

The ponds were created in 1970 and each costs between $110,000 and $130,000 to rehabilitate, much of it for the removal of sediment, replacement of culverts and associated roadwork, she said.

Jennings said the next phase will rehabilitate two more ponds in December and January.

Winter is a good time for the project, she said, because frozen sediment is easier to work with and there is less impact on fish, birds, frogs and salamanders because they aren’t spawning or breeding.

Work earlier this year rescued about 800 fish in the two ponds, including lots of minnows and bass, but left behind carp because they’re invasive species, she said.

“They are part of the (former) pond, it’s just now they’re buried, so they’re providing nutrients into the soil,” Jennings said.

The project is being funded by the authority’s charity, the Hamilton Conservation Foundation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, TD Canada Friends of the Environment and an RBC Blue Water Project grant.