Howlett bumped from Hamilton Conservation Authority board

Community Jun 11, 2015 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Jim Howlett’s 17-year run on the Hamilton Conservation Authority, including as chair for the past six month, has come to an abrupt end after city councillors chose not to reappoint him as one of five citizen directors.

The outspoken Hamilton Beach activist and fellow director Duke O’Sullivan, a former west Mountain councillor who didn’t seek another term, are being replaced by Brad Gautreau and Kristopher Brown.

The new faces join Dan Bowman, Santina Moccio and Maria Topalovic-Jones, reappointed to a second four-year term.

Gautreau helped found Friends of Eramosa Karst, the group that pushed the province to protect the upper Stoney Creek landmark’s feeder lands, while Brown is course superintendent at Glendale Golf and Country Club.

Brenda Johnson, councillor for Glanbrook and Winona and a member of the city’s selection committee, said the decision to not reappoint Howlett reflected an overall desire “to create some openings for fresh blood.”

“It was nothing personal,” she said. “I thank him so much for all his hard work. He continues to always be an environmentalist, and it’s an awesome job that he does on the beach as well as everywhere else.”

Howlett, 54, who at times criticized the authority for being too focused on the Dundas Valley, said he believes appointees are “there to have a community voice, not community silence.”

The retired mechanic, who also served as vice-chair for four years before becoming chair in December, said he’s happy to see more emphasis on the east end, including plans for a new conservation area by the Devil’s Punch Bowl, but declined to take credit.

“There is no I, there is only we when it comes to boards. It isn’t that I accomplished anything, it’s that we accomplished something,” Howlett said. “Do I have satisfaction that we as a board went in that direction? Absolutely.”

Flamborough councillor Robert Pasuta, one of five city politicians on the authority board, said the exclusion of Howlett on the list of appointees came as “a big surprise” when presented at a special council session to ratify a new union contract with city employees.

“Jim is Mr. Conservation, knows every nook and cranny the conservation authority has and beyond that,” he said. “There’s no doubt he’s going to be missed there.”

Gautreau, a Glanbrook resident who teaches electrical apprenticeship at Mohawk College, said he’s honoured to become an authority director and is particularly interested in the Punch Bowl project.

“It’s a good way to get further involved in the community and be a part of what’s going on there,” he said. “It’s a good organization and I’m really happy about it.”

Howlett bumped from Hamilton Conservation Authority board

Move reflects push ‘for fresh blood’

Community Jun 11, 2015 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Jim Howlett’s 17-year run on the Hamilton Conservation Authority, including as chair for the past six month, has come to an abrupt end after city councillors chose not to reappoint him as one of five citizen directors.

The outspoken Hamilton Beach activist and fellow director Duke O’Sullivan, a former west Mountain councillor who didn’t seek another term, are being replaced by Brad Gautreau and Kristopher Brown.

The new faces join Dan Bowman, Santina Moccio and Maria Topalovic-Jones, reappointed to a second four-year term.

Gautreau helped found Friends of Eramosa Karst, the group that pushed the province to protect the upper Stoney Creek landmark’s feeder lands, while Brown is course superintendent at Glendale Golf and Country Club.

“Jim is Mr. Conservation, knows every nook and cranny the conservation authority has and beyond that.”

Brenda Johnson, councillor for Glanbrook and Winona and a member of the city’s selection committee, said the decision to not reappoint Howlett reflected an overall desire “to create some openings for fresh blood.”

“It was nothing personal,” she said. “I thank him so much for all his hard work. He continues to always be an environmentalist, and it’s an awesome job that he does on the beach as well as everywhere else.”

Howlett, 54, who at times criticized the authority for being too focused on the Dundas Valley, said he believes appointees are “there to have a community voice, not community silence.”

The retired mechanic, who also served as vice-chair for four years before becoming chair in December, said he’s happy to see more emphasis on the east end, including plans for a new conservation area by the Devil’s Punch Bowl, but declined to take credit.

“There is no I, there is only we when it comes to boards. It isn’t that I accomplished anything, it’s that we accomplished something,” Howlett said. “Do I have satisfaction that we as a board went in that direction? Absolutely.”

Flamborough councillor Robert Pasuta, one of five city politicians on the authority board, said the exclusion of Howlett on the list of appointees came as “a big surprise” when presented at a special council session to ratify a new union contract with city employees.

“Jim is Mr. Conservation, knows every nook and cranny the conservation authority has and beyond that,” he said. “There’s no doubt he’s going to be missed there.”

Gautreau, a Glanbrook resident who teaches electrical apprenticeship at Mohawk College, said he’s honoured to become an authority director and is particularly interested in the Punch Bowl project.

“It’s a good way to get further involved in the community and be a part of what’s going on there,” he said. “It’s a good organization and I’m really happy about it.”

Howlett bumped from Hamilton Conservation Authority board

Move reflects push ‘for fresh blood’

Community Jun 11, 2015 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Jim Howlett’s 17-year run on the Hamilton Conservation Authority, including as chair for the past six month, has come to an abrupt end after city councillors chose not to reappoint him as one of five citizen directors.

The outspoken Hamilton Beach activist and fellow director Duke O’Sullivan, a former west Mountain councillor who didn’t seek another term, are being replaced by Brad Gautreau and Kristopher Brown.

The new faces join Dan Bowman, Santina Moccio and Maria Topalovic-Jones, reappointed to a second four-year term.

Gautreau helped found Friends of Eramosa Karst, the group that pushed the province to protect the upper Stoney Creek landmark’s feeder lands, while Brown is course superintendent at Glendale Golf and Country Club.

“Jim is Mr. Conservation, knows every nook and cranny the conservation authority has and beyond that.”

Brenda Johnson, councillor for Glanbrook and Winona and a member of the city’s selection committee, said the decision to not reappoint Howlett reflected an overall desire “to create some openings for fresh blood.”

“It was nothing personal,” she said. “I thank him so much for all his hard work. He continues to always be an environmentalist, and it’s an awesome job that he does on the beach as well as everywhere else.”

Howlett, 54, who at times criticized the authority for being too focused on the Dundas Valley, said he believes appointees are “there to have a community voice, not community silence.”

The retired mechanic, who also served as vice-chair for four years before becoming chair in December, said he’s happy to see more emphasis on the east end, including plans for a new conservation area by the Devil’s Punch Bowl, but declined to take credit.

“There is no I, there is only we when it comes to boards. It isn’t that I accomplished anything, it’s that we accomplished something,” Howlett said. “Do I have satisfaction that we as a board went in that direction? Absolutely.”

Flamborough councillor Robert Pasuta, one of five city politicians on the authority board, said the exclusion of Howlett on the list of appointees came as “a big surprise” when presented at a special council session to ratify a new union contract with city employees.

“Jim is Mr. Conservation, knows every nook and cranny the conservation authority has and beyond that,” he said. “There’s no doubt he’s going to be missed there.”

Gautreau, a Glanbrook resident who teaches electrical apprenticeship at Mohawk College, said he’s honoured to become an authority director and is particularly interested in the Punch Bowl project.

“It’s a good way to get further involved in the community and be a part of what’s going on there,” he said. “It’s a good organization and I’m really happy about it.”