Getting the word out about 'wonderful' palliative care service

Community Jun 08, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Margot Rudland had not heard of the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice until her daughter needed the palliative care service.

That’s not unusual, as many people are unaware of the centre which takes a burden off patients and their families in their final days.

But she wants to make sure everyone knows about Dr. Bob’s Place should they ever need its services.

“It’s wonderful that it’s here,” says Rudland. “The whole atmosphere is so relaxing and very loving. Everything is so peaceful.”

Her daughter, Sandra Jacobs, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of ALS in April 2014.

Approaching her final days, Jacobs, 56, moved into the 10-bed hospice in February.

Family is able to come and go as they please 24 hours a day — there are no stringent visiting hours — and the non-clinical environment brings everyone great comfort, says Jacobs. The hospice also offers music therapy, reflexology, dental care and nail care — things one doesn’t get at a hospital.

“If this is your last stop, you don’t want to be in an institution,” she says. “You want to be in a home-like environment. It’s important to be comfortable.”

Unlike other hospices, a person’s stay at Dr. Bob’s is entirely free. The hospice, located on Stone Church Road at Upper Wellington, gets 61 per cent of its funding from the provincial government, but it still must come up with about $130,000 each month.

“They have to raise it on their own — that’s a lot of money,” says Jacobs.

To do this, the hospice holds numerous fundraisers throughout the year.

On Saturday, it’s the 11th annual Hike for Hospice fundraiser. It takes place at Confederation Park (Edgewater Pavillion), 680 Van Wagners Beach Rd. Registration is at 11 a.m.; see kemphospice.org or call 905-387-2448 for details.

Rudland will be there as a member of Schatzi’s Angels. (Schatzi, a German word for treasure, is her daughter’s nickname.)

While she is in a walker these days after breaking her hip in four places five years ago, Rudland plans to walk the whole distance.

“I will walk as much as I can, sit down, then walk again.”

Sandra and her husband, Lloyd, Stoney Creek residents, were married on Dec. 13.

Lloyd can’t say enough good things about the care his wife has received at Dr. Bob’s.

“It has prolonged her life — I’m convinced of that,” he says. “If she was still at home, we would not be talking to you right now. If she weren’t here, there’s no way she’d be alive.”

Jacobs can no longer breathe on her own. A “sip and puff” device allows her to take air in and talk in short bursts; at night she requires a mask and a ventilatory assist machine similar to those used by people with sleep apnea.

During her stay at Dr. Bob’s, Jacobs has seen another area where the hospice need helps. She wants to raise money to help buy a second Hoyer lift, a hydraulic patient assistance device used by staff to help move patients in and out of bed and in the shower.

“There are 10 people here and one Hoyer lift,” says Jacobs. “It’s very hard for them to manage.”

To raise money, she hopes to sell T-shirts and other merchandise with her pet pug Ruby’s face on them and give the profits to the hospice.

Getting the word out about 'wonderful' palliative care service

Hike for Hospice helps Dr. Bob's provide end-of-life service

Community Jun 08, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Margot Rudland had not heard of the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice until her daughter needed the palliative care service.

That’s not unusual, as many people are unaware of the centre which takes a burden off patients and their families in their final days.

But she wants to make sure everyone knows about Dr. Bob’s Place should they ever need its services.

“It’s wonderful that it’s here,” says Rudland. “The whole atmosphere is so relaxing and very loving. Everything is so peaceful.”

“If this is your last stop, you don’t want to be in an institution. You want to be in a home-like environment. It’s important to be comfortable.

Her daughter, Sandra Jacobs, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of ALS in April 2014.

Approaching her final days, Jacobs, 56, moved into the 10-bed hospice in February.

Family is able to come and go as they please 24 hours a day — there are no stringent visiting hours — and the non-clinical environment brings everyone great comfort, says Jacobs. The hospice also offers music therapy, reflexology, dental care and nail care — things one doesn’t get at a hospital.

“If this is your last stop, you don’t want to be in an institution,” she says. “You want to be in a home-like environment. It’s important to be comfortable.”

Unlike other hospices, a person’s stay at Dr. Bob’s is entirely free. The hospice, located on Stone Church Road at Upper Wellington, gets 61 per cent of its funding from the provincial government, but it still must come up with about $130,000 each month.

“They have to raise it on their own — that’s a lot of money,” says Jacobs.

To do this, the hospice holds numerous fundraisers throughout the year.

On Saturday, it’s the 11th annual Hike for Hospice fundraiser. It takes place at Confederation Park (Edgewater Pavillion), 680 Van Wagners Beach Rd. Registration is at 11 a.m.; see kemphospice.org or call 905-387-2448 for details.

Rudland will be there as a member of Schatzi’s Angels. (Schatzi, a German word for treasure, is her daughter’s nickname.)

While she is in a walker these days after breaking her hip in four places five years ago, Rudland plans to walk the whole distance.

“I will walk as much as I can, sit down, then walk again.”

Sandra and her husband, Lloyd, Stoney Creek residents, were married on Dec. 13.

Lloyd can’t say enough good things about the care his wife has received at Dr. Bob’s.

“It has prolonged her life — I’m convinced of that,” he says. “If she was still at home, we would not be talking to you right now. If she weren’t here, there’s no way she’d be alive.”

Jacobs can no longer breathe on her own. A “sip and puff” device allows her to take air in and talk in short bursts; at night she requires a mask and a ventilatory assist machine similar to those used by people with sleep apnea.

During her stay at Dr. Bob’s, Jacobs has seen another area where the hospice need helps. She wants to raise money to help buy a second Hoyer lift, a hydraulic patient assistance device used by staff to help move patients in and out of bed and in the shower.

“There are 10 people here and one Hoyer lift,” says Jacobs. “It’s very hard for them to manage.”

To raise money, she hopes to sell T-shirts and other merchandise with her pet pug Ruby’s face on them and give the profits to the hospice.

Getting the word out about 'wonderful' palliative care service

Hike for Hospice helps Dr. Bob's provide end-of-life service

Community Jun 08, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Margot Rudland had not heard of the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice until her daughter needed the palliative care service.

That’s not unusual, as many people are unaware of the centre which takes a burden off patients and their families in their final days.

But she wants to make sure everyone knows about Dr. Bob’s Place should they ever need its services.

“It’s wonderful that it’s here,” says Rudland. “The whole atmosphere is so relaxing and very loving. Everything is so peaceful.”

“If this is your last stop, you don’t want to be in an institution. You want to be in a home-like environment. It’s important to be comfortable.

Her daughter, Sandra Jacobs, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of ALS in April 2014.

Approaching her final days, Jacobs, 56, moved into the 10-bed hospice in February.

Family is able to come and go as they please 24 hours a day — there are no stringent visiting hours — and the non-clinical environment brings everyone great comfort, says Jacobs. The hospice also offers music therapy, reflexology, dental care and nail care — things one doesn’t get at a hospital.

“If this is your last stop, you don’t want to be in an institution,” she says. “You want to be in a home-like environment. It’s important to be comfortable.”

Unlike other hospices, a person’s stay at Dr. Bob’s is entirely free. The hospice, located on Stone Church Road at Upper Wellington, gets 61 per cent of its funding from the provincial government, but it still must come up with about $130,000 each month.

“They have to raise it on their own — that’s a lot of money,” says Jacobs.

To do this, the hospice holds numerous fundraisers throughout the year.

On Saturday, it’s the 11th annual Hike for Hospice fundraiser. It takes place at Confederation Park (Edgewater Pavillion), 680 Van Wagners Beach Rd. Registration is at 11 a.m.; see kemphospice.org or call 905-387-2448 for details.

Rudland will be there as a member of Schatzi’s Angels. (Schatzi, a German word for treasure, is her daughter’s nickname.)

While she is in a walker these days after breaking her hip in four places five years ago, Rudland plans to walk the whole distance.

“I will walk as much as I can, sit down, then walk again.”

Sandra and her husband, Lloyd, Stoney Creek residents, were married on Dec. 13.

Lloyd can’t say enough good things about the care his wife has received at Dr. Bob’s.

“It has prolonged her life — I’m convinced of that,” he says. “If she was still at home, we would not be talking to you right now. If she weren’t here, there’s no way she’d be alive.”

Jacobs can no longer breathe on her own. A “sip and puff” device allows her to take air in and talk in short bursts; at night she requires a mask and a ventilatory assist machine similar to those used by people with sleep apnea.

During her stay at Dr. Bob’s, Jacobs has seen another area where the hospice need helps. She wants to raise money to help buy a second Hoyer lift, a hydraulic patient assistance device used by staff to help move patients in and out of bed and in the shower.

“There are 10 people here and one Hoyer lift,” says Jacobs. “It’s very hard for them to manage.”

To raise money, she hopes to sell T-shirts and other merchandise with her pet pug Ruby’s face on them and give the profits to the hospice.