Taro dump committee edges closer to full membership

Community Jun 04, 2015 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

It’s taken nearly a year, but the liaison committee providing citizen oversight on upper Stoney Creek’s Taro industrial dump has finally filled one of two vacant community positions.

The two existing community representatives and Councillor Maria Pearson voted unanimously on Monday to accept Josie Bonaventura even though she lives slightly beyond the preferred boundary for membership.

“Beggars can’t be choosers,” community rep Bob Hart said.

“We do know that it’s hard to get somebody that’s interested,” agreed Randy Valchuk, the other member. “She’s very close and it isn’t a cut-and-dry (rule).”

The committee, which meets quarterly, has been struggling to fill its allotted four community positions since December 2013 and will try again on the remaining spot in the fall.

Preference is given to people living within 1.5 km of the dump and members were told Bonaventura lives in the Billy Green school area, which is just beyond that limit.

The retired teacher has just completed a five-year term on the Heritage Green Community Trust, formed to dole out royalties from the dump, which has changed hands three times since its controversial approval in 1996.

Terrapure Environmental became the latest owner in February when Alberta-based Newalta Corp sold its industrial division to Toronto’s Birch Hill Equity Partners for $300 million.

The sale included the closed Taro west dump, set to open soon as a city-run dog park, and a transfer station on Imperial Street in the lower city that processes wastes destined for the Taro east dump, licensed for solid, nonhazardous materials.

Other members on the liaison committee include the area’s councillor, Doug Conley, two Terrapure representatives and Geoffrey Knapper, district manager for the Ministry of the Environment. The latter three are non-voting members.

Lorenzo Alfano, Terrapure’s district boss, told the committee the site has been “very, very busy” the past few months because of higher volumes of waste, especially slag, from ArcelorMittal Dofasco.

He said dust exceeded 20 hourly and four daily limits in May, which he attributed to traffic and housing construction in the area as well as dust from new dump berms that will be seeded with grass.

Alfano said the dump also had two odour complaints, but one came in too late to determine the source and the other didn’t support suggestions a leachate lagoon was responsible because winds weren’t blowing toward the complainant.

As for the dog park, he said the company was set to meet with the city on June 4 to sign off on some final work needed to allow it to open to the public.

Taro dump committee edges closer to full membership

Community Jun 04, 2015 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

It’s taken nearly a year, but the liaison committee providing citizen oversight on upper Stoney Creek’s Taro industrial dump has finally filled one of two vacant community positions.

The two existing community representatives and Councillor Maria Pearson voted unanimously on Monday to accept Josie Bonaventura even though she lives slightly beyond the preferred boundary for membership.

“Beggars can’t be choosers,” community rep Bob Hart said.

“We do know that it’s hard to get somebody that’s interested,” agreed Randy Valchuk, the other member. “She’s very close and it isn’t a cut-and-dry (rule).”

“Beggars can’t be choosers.”

The committee, which meets quarterly, has been struggling to fill its allotted four community positions since December 2013 and will try again on the remaining spot in the fall.

Preference is given to people living within 1.5 km of the dump and members were told Bonaventura lives in the Billy Green school area, which is just beyond that limit.

The retired teacher has just completed a five-year term on the Heritage Green Community Trust, formed to dole out royalties from the dump, which has changed hands three times since its controversial approval in 1996.

Terrapure Environmental became the latest owner in February when Alberta-based Newalta Corp sold its industrial division to Toronto’s Birch Hill Equity Partners for $300 million.

The sale included the closed Taro west dump, set to open soon as a city-run dog park, and a transfer station on Imperial Street in the lower city that processes wastes destined for the Taro east dump, licensed for solid, nonhazardous materials.

Other members on the liaison committee include the area’s councillor, Doug Conley, two Terrapure representatives and Geoffrey Knapper, district manager for the Ministry of the Environment. The latter three are non-voting members.

Lorenzo Alfano, Terrapure’s district boss, told the committee the site has been “very, very busy” the past few months because of higher volumes of waste, especially slag, from ArcelorMittal Dofasco.

He said dust exceeded 20 hourly and four daily limits in May, which he attributed to traffic and housing construction in the area as well as dust from new dump berms that will be seeded with grass.

Alfano said the dump also had two odour complaints, but one came in too late to determine the source and the other didn’t support suggestions a leachate lagoon was responsible because winds weren’t blowing toward the complainant.

As for the dog park, he said the company was set to meet with the city on June 4 to sign off on some final work needed to allow it to open to the public.

Taro dump committee edges closer to full membership

Community Jun 04, 2015 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

It’s taken nearly a year, but the liaison committee providing citizen oversight on upper Stoney Creek’s Taro industrial dump has finally filled one of two vacant community positions.

The two existing community representatives and Councillor Maria Pearson voted unanimously on Monday to accept Josie Bonaventura even though she lives slightly beyond the preferred boundary for membership.

“Beggars can’t be choosers,” community rep Bob Hart said.

“We do know that it’s hard to get somebody that’s interested,” agreed Randy Valchuk, the other member. “She’s very close and it isn’t a cut-and-dry (rule).”

“Beggars can’t be choosers.”

The committee, which meets quarterly, has been struggling to fill its allotted four community positions since December 2013 and will try again on the remaining spot in the fall.

Preference is given to people living within 1.5 km of the dump and members were told Bonaventura lives in the Billy Green school area, which is just beyond that limit.

The retired teacher has just completed a five-year term on the Heritage Green Community Trust, formed to dole out royalties from the dump, which has changed hands three times since its controversial approval in 1996.

Terrapure Environmental became the latest owner in February when Alberta-based Newalta Corp sold its industrial division to Toronto’s Birch Hill Equity Partners for $300 million.

The sale included the closed Taro west dump, set to open soon as a city-run dog park, and a transfer station on Imperial Street in the lower city that processes wastes destined for the Taro east dump, licensed for solid, nonhazardous materials.

Other members on the liaison committee include the area’s councillor, Doug Conley, two Terrapure representatives and Geoffrey Knapper, district manager for the Ministry of the Environment. The latter three are non-voting members.

Lorenzo Alfano, Terrapure’s district boss, told the committee the site has been “very, very busy” the past few months because of higher volumes of waste, especially slag, from ArcelorMittal Dofasco.

He said dust exceeded 20 hourly and four daily limits in May, which he attributed to traffic and housing construction in the area as well as dust from new dump berms that will be seeded with grass.

Alfano said the dump also had two odour complaints, but one came in too late to determine the source and the other didn’t support suggestions a leachate lagoon was responsible because winds weren’t blowing toward the complainant.

As for the dog park, he said the company was set to meet with the city on June 4 to sign off on some final work needed to allow it to open to the public.