Pan Am Torch Relay runs through Mountain without stopping

Community Jun 01, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The Pan Am Games Torch Relay is making stops in Stoney Creek, Ancaster, Dundas, Waterdown and the waterfront.

But it has no scheduled stop on the Mountain, an oversight that had some councillors upset.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead said during the Pan Am Games, the mountain will have two practice facilities for the soccer teams participating at the new Pan Am Stadium. Yet, he said, there is no location where the relay can “engage” with mountain residents like it is doing at Gage Park or Waterdown.

“I’m a bit concerned,” he said. “We are part of (the Pan Am Games). Running down the Linc doesn’t cut it. You want to put the best face (forward).”

Shelly Merlo, cultural coordinator for the Pan Am Games, said the Torch Relay will travel along the Red Hill Parkway and the Lincoln Alexander Parkway on its way to Ancaster. But “timing” prevented the organizing committee from having an event at a mountain location with the Torch, she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson asked if a detour could be incorporated into the already announced schedule to possibility Turner Park or Mohawk Park. Merlo said no.

The 41-day Torch Run started in Toronto May 30 and will travel through Hamilton starting June 21, extending its stay until June 22. The Hamilton portion of the relay begins at Puddicombe Farms in Winona, and continues to the Stoney Creek Cenotaph Park, along the Red Hill Parkway and Linc to Ancaster’s Old Town Hall, followed by stops at McMaster University’s Children’s Hospital, Grafton Square in Dundas, and American House in Waterdown. Merlo said there are “celebration” sites at Gage Park and the Waterfront at Pier 8 with the Torch that incorporate music, dancing, and other multicultural activities.

Merlo said the Torch Relay is about 15 metres in length that will be covered by the media.

“Hamilton will be showcased to the world,” she said.

There are about 3,000 torch bearers who will travel through 130 communities and over 20,000 kilometres on the road and in the air before it concludes its trip in Toronto for the Opening Ceremonies July 10.

Meanwhile, Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla requested staff investigate if the city has the authority to determine the type of images that are broadcast during the Torch Relay and other Pan Am events. He said in the past broadcasters have showed the industrial parts of the city, including its steelmaking operations, which has perpetuated stereotypes of Hamilton.

“Can you direct them to provide visuals we approve?” he asked. 

He called the request to broadcasters to provide alternate visuals of Hamilton a “friendly gesture.”

City staff will investigate the issue.

 

Pan Am Torch Relay runs through Mountain without stopping

Community Jun 01, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The Pan Am Games Torch Relay is making stops in Stoney Creek, Ancaster, Dundas, Waterdown and the waterfront.

But it has no scheduled stop on the Mountain, an oversight that had some councillors upset.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead said during the Pan Am Games, the mountain will have two practice facilities for the soccer teams participating at the new Pan Am Stadium. Yet, he said, there is no location where the relay can “engage” with mountain residents like it is doing at Gage Park or Waterdown.

“I’m a bit concerned,” he said. “We are part of (the Pan Am Games). Running down the Linc doesn’t cut it. You want to put the best face (forward).”

Shelly Merlo, cultural coordinator for the Pan Am Games, said the Torch Relay will travel along the Red Hill Parkway and the Lincoln Alexander Parkway on its way to Ancaster. But “timing” prevented the organizing committee from having an event at a mountain location with the Torch, she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson asked if a detour could be incorporated into the already announced schedule to possibility Turner Park or Mohawk Park. Merlo said no.

The 41-day Torch Run started in Toronto May 30 and will travel through Hamilton starting June 21, extending its stay until June 22. The Hamilton portion of the relay begins at Puddicombe Farms in Winona, and continues to the Stoney Creek Cenotaph Park, along the Red Hill Parkway and Linc to Ancaster’s Old Town Hall, followed by stops at McMaster University’s Children’s Hospital, Grafton Square in Dundas, and American House in Waterdown. Merlo said there are “celebration” sites at Gage Park and the Waterfront at Pier 8 with the Torch that incorporate music, dancing, and other multicultural activities.

Merlo said the Torch Relay is about 15 metres in length that will be covered by the media.

“Hamilton will be showcased to the world,” she said.

There are about 3,000 torch bearers who will travel through 130 communities and over 20,000 kilometres on the road and in the air before it concludes its trip in Toronto for the Opening Ceremonies July 10.

Meanwhile, Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla requested staff investigate if the city has the authority to determine the type of images that are broadcast during the Torch Relay and other Pan Am events. He said in the past broadcasters have showed the industrial parts of the city, including its steelmaking operations, which has perpetuated stereotypes of Hamilton.

“Can you direct them to provide visuals we approve?” he asked. 

He called the request to broadcasters to provide alternate visuals of Hamilton a “friendly gesture.”

City staff will investigate the issue.

 

Pan Am Torch Relay runs through Mountain without stopping

Community Jun 01, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The Pan Am Games Torch Relay is making stops in Stoney Creek, Ancaster, Dundas, Waterdown and the waterfront.

But it has no scheduled stop on the Mountain, an oversight that had some councillors upset.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead said during the Pan Am Games, the mountain will have two practice facilities for the soccer teams participating at the new Pan Am Stadium. Yet, he said, there is no location where the relay can “engage” with mountain residents like it is doing at Gage Park or Waterdown.

“I’m a bit concerned,” he said. “We are part of (the Pan Am Games). Running down the Linc doesn’t cut it. You want to put the best face (forward).”

Shelly Merlo, cultural coordinator for the Pan Am Games, said the Torch Relay will travel along the Red Hill Parkway and the Lincoln Alexander Parkway on its way to Ancaster. But “timing” prevented the organizing committee from having an event at a mountain location with the Torch, she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson asked if a detour could be incorporated into the already announced schedule to possibility Turner Park or Mohawk Park. Merlo said no.

The 41-day Torch Run started in Toronto May 30 and will travel through Hamilton starting June 21, extending its stay until June 22. The Hamilton portion of the relay begins at Puddicombe Farms in Winona, and continues to the Stoney Creek Cenotaph Park, along the Red Hill Parkway and Linc to Ancaster’s Old Town Hall, followed by stops at McMaster University’s Children’s Hospital, Grafton Square in Dundas, and American House in Waterdown. Merlo said there are “celebration” sites at Gage Park and the Waterfront at Pier 8 with the Torch that incorporate music, dancing, and other multicultural activities.

Merlo said the Torch Relay is about 15 metres in length that will be covered by the media.

“Hamilton will be showcased to the world,” she said.

There are about 3,000 torch bearers who will travel through 130 communities and over 20,000 kilometres on the road and in the air before it concludes its trip in Toronto for the Opening Ceremonies July 10.

Meanwhile, Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla requested staff investigate if the city has the authority to determine the type of images that are broadcast during the Torch Relay and other Pan Am events. He said in the past broadcasters have showed the industrial parts of the city, including its steelmaking operations, which has perpetuated stereotypes of Hamilton.

“Can you direct them to provide visuals we approve?” he asked. 

He called the request to broadcasters to provide alternate visuals of Hamilton a “friendly gesture.”

City staff will investigate the issue.