Authority seeks help in finding Dundas Valley's trillium patches

Community May 26, 2015 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The Hamilton Conservation Authority is seeking the public’s help in finding where the Dundas Valley’s trilliums grow.

Ecologist Lesley McDonell said the goal is to monitor if deer are reducing the abundance of Ontario’s official flower.

She put out a call for photos of trillium patches through the authority’s website and Facebook page about two weeks ago, but hadn’t received any responses as of last Friday.

McDonell said the flowers are nearly done blooming for this year, but she still welcomes information on where they can be found and will put out another call next year.

“Instead of me walking through the whole Dundas Valley, which is quite large, I thought I would request of the public because there’s lots of people who walk the valley daily and trilliums are very easy to identify in the spring,” she said.

“If you can find trilliums, you can study the height of them and relate that to impacts from deer and rabbits and other species that might be eating those plants.”

McDonell said the trillium initiative compliments other monitoring efforts like fenced research plots that assess the difference in plant growth when deer are kept out and visual surveys of what deer ate over the winter.

She said she doesn’t know if deer numbers have changed since a February 2013 aerial survey counted 266, or about triple the population the Ministry of Natural Resources considers ecologically desirable, in an 880-hectare section of the valley.

“That’s our best way to estimate,” she said.

Anyone with information on valley trillium locations can contact her at 905-525-2181 ext. 231 or at lesley.mcdonell@conservationhamilton.ca.

Authority seeks help in finding Dundas Valley's trillium patches

Effort will help gauge deer impacts, ecologist says

Community May 26, 2015 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The Hamilton Conservation Authority is seeking the public’s help in finding where the Dundas Valley’s trilliums grow.

Ecologist Lesley McDonell said the goal is to monitor if deer are reducing the abundance of Ontario’s official flower.

She put out a call for photos of trillium patches through the authority’s website and Facebook page about two weeks ago, but hadn’t received any responses as of last Friday.

McDonell said the flowers are nearly done blooming for this year, but she still welcomes information on where they can be found and will put out another call next year.

“If you can find trilliums, you can study the height of them and relate that to impacts from deer and rabbits and other species that might be eating those plants.”

“Instead of me walking through the whole Dundas Valley, which is quite large, I thought I would request of the public because there’s lots of people who walk the valley daily and trilliums are very easy to identify in the spring,” she said.

“If you can find trilliums, you can study the height of them and relate that to impacts from deer and rabbits and other species that might be eating those plants.”

McDonell said the trillium initiative compliments other monitoring efforts like fenced research plots that assess the difference in plant growth when deer are kept out and visual surveys of what deer ate over the winter.

She said she doesn’t know if deer numbers have changed since a February 2013 aerial survey counted 266, or about triple the population the Ministry of Natural Resources considers ecologically desirable, in an 880-hectare section of the valley.

“That’s our best way to estimate,” she said.

Anyone with information on valley trillium locations can contact her at 905-525-2181 ext. 231 or at lesley.mcdonell@conservationhamilton.ca.

Authority seeks help in finding Dundas Valley's trillium patches

Effort will help gauge deer impacts, ecologist says

Community May 26, 2015 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The Hamilton Conservation Authority is seeking the public’s help in finding where the Dundas Valley’s trilliums grow.

Ecologist Lesley McDonell said the goal is to monitor if deer are reducing the abundance of Ontario’s official flower.

She put out a call for photos of trillium patches through the authority’s website and Facebook page about two weeks ago, but hadn’t received any responses as of last Friday.

McDonell said the flowers are nearly done blooming for this year, but she still welcomes information on where they can be found and will put out another call next year.

“If you can find trilliums, you can study the height of them and relate that to impacts from deer and rabbits and other species that might be eating those plants.”

“Instead of me walking through the whole Dundas Valley, which is quite large, I thought I would request of the public because there’s lots of people who walk the valley daily and trilliums are very easy to identify in the spring,” she said.

“If you can find trilliums, you can study the height of them and relate that to impacts from deer and rabbits and other species that might be eating those plants.”

McDonell said the trillium initiative compliments other monitoring efforts like fenced research plots that assess the difference in plant growth when deer are kept out and visual surveys of what deer ate over the winter.

She said she doesn’t know if deer numbers have changed since a February 2013 aerial survey counted 266, or about triple the population the Ministry of Natural Resources considers ecologically desirable, in an 880-hectare section of the valley.

“That’s our best way to estimate,” she said.

Anyone with information on valley trillium locations can contact her at 905-525-2181 ext. 231 or at lesley.mcdonell@conservationhamilton.ca.