Mayor urges Hamilton public schools to belly up on food recycling

Community May 21, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board will explore how it can get schools to stop throwing food in the garbage and possibly join the city’s curbside recycling program.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger raised the issue at a meeting of city and school officials after hearing food recycling is hit-and-miss at schools because it relies on volunteers and is part of a private contract covering more traditional blue-box wastes.

He said he’s been asked by principals and other school staff if the city will pick up green-cart wastes and other recyclables from schools.

“The city’s completely equipped to collect everywhere and drives by the school, I’m sure, multiple times to pick up whatever they pick up on recycling and composting action,” Eisenberger told members of the city-board liaison committee.

“Why aren’t we talking about how we can do this jointly and encouraging actually composting at all of the schools?” he said. “We can have our guys look at what’s do-able, but I don’t think there’s any barriers to doing that.”

At the mayor’s behest, the committee agreed to ask staff from both sides to discuss the possibility of “a collaborative recycling-compositing program” and report to its next meeting, scheduled for October.

“It’s great for the kids to learn about recycling,” Stoney Creek councillor Doug Conley said. “If they don’t do it when they’re young, it’s harder to get them (to do it when they’re older.)”

Board chair Todd White said afterwards he’s not sure how many schools recycle food wastes and will ask staff if there are any reasons the board can’t participate in the city’s green-cart curbside program.

“From the perspective that the mayor presented, it seemed like a no-brainer. We just need to look at it from a school-by-school perspective to make sure we can operationalize it,” he said.

“Hopefully, there’s a simple answer. If not, we’ll explore it and we’ll do what we can to make it available.”

Mayor urges Hamilton public schools to belly up on food recycling

Community May 21, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board will explore how it can get schools to stop throwing food in the garbage and possibly join the city’s curbside recycling program.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger raised the issue at a meeting of city and school officials after hearing food recycling is hit-and-miss at schools because it relies on volunteers and is part of a private contract covering more traditional blue-box wastes.

He said he’s been asked by principals and other school staff if the city will pick up green-cart wastes and other recyclables from schools.

“The city’s completely equipped to collect everywhere and drives by the school, I’m sure, multiple times to pick up whatever they pick up on recycling and composting action,” Eisenberger told members of the city-board liaison committee.

“From the perspective that the mayor presented, it seemed like a no-brainer."

“Why aren’t we talking about how we can do this jointly and encouraging actually composting at all of the schools?” he said. “We can have our guys look at what’s do-able, but I don’t think there’s any barriers to doing that.”

At the mayor’s behest, the committee agreed to ask staff from both sides to discuss the possibility of “a collaborative recycling-compositing program” and report to its next meeting, scheduled for October.

“It’s great for the kids to learn about recycling,” Stoney Creek councillor Doug Conley said. “If they don’t do it when they’re young, it’s harder to get them (to do it when they’re older.)”

Board chair Todd White said afterwards he’s not sure how many schools recycle food wastes and will ask staff if there are any reasons the board can’t participate in the city’s green-cart curbside program.

“From the perspective that the mayor presented, it seemed like a no-brainer. We just need to look at it from a school-by-school perspective to make sure we can operationalize it,” he said.

“Hopefully, there’s a simple answer. If not, we’ll explore it and we’ll do what we can to make it available.”

Mayor urges Hamilton public schools to belly up on food recycling

Community May 21, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board will explore how it can get schools to stop throwing food in the garbage and possibly join the city’s curbside recycling program.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger raised the issue at a meeting of city and school officials after hearing food recycling is hit-and-miss at schools because it relies on volunteers and is part of a private contract covering more traditional blue-box wastes.

He said he’s been asked by principals and other school staff if the city will pick up green-cart wastes and other recyclables from schools.

“The city’s completely equipped to collect everywhere and drives by the school, I’m sure, multiple times to pick up whatever they pick up on recycling and composting action,” Eisenberger told members of the city-board liaison committee.

“From the perspective that the mayor presented, it seemed like a no-brainer."

“Why aren’t we talking about how we can do this jointly and encouraging actually composting at all of the schools?” he said. “We can have our guys look at what’s do-able, but I don’t think there’s any barriers to doing that.”

At the mayor’s behest, the committee agreed to ask staff from both sides to discuss the possibility of “a collaborative recycling-compositing program” and report to its next meeting, scheduled for October.

“It’s great for the kids to learn about recycling,” Stoney Creek councillor Doug Conley said. “If they don’t do it when they’re young, it’s harder to get them (to do it when they’re older.)”

Board chair Todd White said afterwards he’s not sure how many schools recycle food wastes and will ask staff if there are any reasons the board can’t participate in the city’s green-cart curbside program.

“From the perspective that the mayor presented, it seemed like a no-brainer. We just need to look at it from a school-by-school perspective to make sure we can operationalize it,” he said.

“Hopefully, there’s a simple answer. If not, we’ll explore it and we’ll do what we can to make it available.”