Braley Health Sciences Centre is “future” of urban care for municipalities, says Hamilton businessman

Community May 15, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The new David Braley Health Sciences Centre in downtown Hamilton is the future of health care in urban areas, says the businessman whose name now adorns the building.

Braley, who was honoured during the grand opening of the $84.6 million facility on the former Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board headquarters property May 15 with the official unveiling of his name on the distinctive glass structure, says integrating health education students and professionals will benefit the entire community, including beyond the city.

“This is the future of urban care in major communities where there are not enough doctors,” said Braley, who owns Orlick Industries Ltd. “I can see this being in every major city.”

Braley, along with other dignitaries including McMaster University president Patrick Dean, and David Price, the chair of the Department of Family Medicine, various politicians, and city and university officials, talked about the potential of the cooperative work that will occur between McMaster medical students and the city’s health care professionals.

Price talked about how the facility, across the street from City Hall, is a “unique collaboration between primary care and public health.”

It’s projected there will be about 450 medical staff located in the six-storey, 192,000-square-foot facility. They will be joined by an additional 110 public health staff from the city. McMaster University officials estimate there will be about 50,000 patient interactions annually at the facility.

McMaster officials say first-year nursing students will use the building, while 30 medical residents will have a four-month stay at the clinic. The 80 Hamilton-based residents will spend at least one day a week at the facility, while 200 residents in McMaster University’s medical school will get a minimum of six clinical days at the campus.

“What we will do now is increase health care to citizens and then increase our research base and everything will work together,” said Braley. “I understand there are 100 patients in the first week here. That is quite an achievement.”

The building itself, which sparked superlative comments from all the assembled guests, is a testament to the design’s attempt to make the entire structure welcoming and interactive for patients and the staff that will be working in the environment.

The main floor has enough space to host a coffee shop, pharmacy and a garden. A large, dominate wooden staircase leads to the second floor. To the right is a large lecture hall that looks out over Main Street and City Hall, with a capacity to sit 240 people. There are 11 classrooms on the second floor, and 48 exam rooms on the third floor. The clinic on the third floor has space enough for an aquarium in the waiting room.

Doctors have no offices, but they have access to shared spaces and open meeting rooms.

“It’s a terrific looking building,” said Braley. “It’s beautiful.”

Not only is the structure striking, but it’s in a prime location, said Braley, which will provide access for patients, while also contributing to the downtown’s revitalization.

“The location is absolutely critical,” said Braley. “It’s part of the economic development of the downtown on King Street and on to Jackson Square, the Convention Centre and Copps Coliseum. It’s absolutely important.”

Neil Everson, executive director of the city’s economic development department said the building will provide visitors with a vastly different view on Hamilton.

“It’s a domino effect with an institution like this,” said Everson, as work continues on the former Federal Building down Main Street to convert it into condominiums. “It’s something to see that happen.”

Braley, who was surprised as anybody that McMaster named the building after him, contributed $10 million to the facility. The donation was part of his $50 million contribution to the university he made in 2007.

“I did not ask for my name to be on this building,” said Braley. “I’m very honoured.”

The city of Hamilton provided $20 million to the building, as did the province of Ontario, while McMaster University also contributed to the cost.

Braley Health Sciences Centre is “future” of urban care for municipalities, says Hamilton businessman

Community May 15, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The new David Braley Health Sciences Centre in downtown Hamilton is the future of health care in urban areas, says the businessman whose name now adorns the building.

Braley, who was honoured during the grand opening of the $84.6 million facility on the former Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board headquarters property May 15 with the official unveiling of his name on the distinctive glass structure, says integrating health education students and professionals will benefit the entire community, including beyond the city.

“This is the future of urban care in major communities where there are not enough doctors,” said Braley, who owns Orlick Industries Ltd. “I can see this being in every major city.”

Braley, along with other dignitaries including McMaster University president Patrick Dean, and David Price, the chair of the Department of Family Medicine, various politicians, and city and university officials, talked about the potential of the cooperative work that will occur between McMaster medical students and the city’s health care professionals.

Price talked about how the facility, across the street from City Hall, is a “unique collaboration between primary care and public health.”

It’s projected there will be about 450 medical staff located in the six-storey, 192,000-square-foot facility. They will be joined by an additional 110 public health staff from the city. McMaster University officials estimate there will be about 50,000 patient interactions annually at the facility.

McMaster officials say first-year nursing students will use the building, while 30 medical residents will have a four-month stay at the clinic. The 80 Hamilton-based residents will spend at least one day a week at the facility, while 200 residents in McMaster University’s medical school will get a minimum of six clinical days at the campus.

“What we will do now is increase health care to citizens and then increase our research base and everything will work together,” said Braley. “I understand there are 100 patients in the first week here. That is quite an achievement.”

The building itself, which sparked superlative comments from all the assembled guests, is a testament to the design’s attempt to make the entire structure welcoming and interactive for patients and the staff that will be working in the environment.

The main floor has enough space to host a coffee shop, pharmacy and a garden. A large, dominate wooden staircase leads to the second floor. To the right is a large lecture hall that looks out over Main Street and City Hall, with a capacity to sit 240 people. There are 11 classrooms on the second floor, and 48 exam rooms on the third floor. The clinic on the third floor has space enough for an aquarium in the waiting room.

Doctors have no offices, but they have access to shared spaces and open meeting rooms.

“It’s a terrific looking building,” said Braley. “It’s beautiful.”

Not only is the structure striking, but it’s in a prime location, said Braley, which will provide access for patients, while also contributing to the downtown’s revitalization.

“The location is absolutely critical,” said Braley. “It’s part of the economic development of the downtown on King Street and on to Jackson Square, the Convention Centre and Copps Coliseum. It’s absolutely important.”

Neil Everson, executive director of the city’s economic development department said the building will provide visitors with a vastly different view on Hamilton.

“It’s a domino effect with an institution like this,” said Everson, as work continues on the former Federal Building down Main Street to convert it into condominiums. “It’s something to see that happen.”

Braley, who was surprised as anybody that McMaster named the building after him, contributed $10 million to the facility. The donation was part of his $50 million contribution to the university he made in 2007.

“I did not ask for my name to be on this building,” said Braley. “I’m very honoured.”

The city of Hamilton provided $20 million to the building, as did the province of Ontario, while McMaster University also contributed to the cost.

Braley Health Sciences Centre is “future” of urban care for municipalities, says Hamilton businessman

Community May 15, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The new David Braley Health Sciences Centre in downtown Hamilton is the future of health care in urban areas, says the businessman whose name now adorns the building.

Braley, who was honoured during the grand opening of the $84.6 million facility on the former Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board headquarters property May 15 with the official unveiling of his name on the distinctive glass structure, says integrating health education students and professionals will benefit the entire community, including beyond the city.

“This is the future of urban care in major communities where there are not enough doctors,” said Braley, who owns Orlick Industries Ltd. “I can see this being in every major city.”

Braley, along with other dignitaries including McMaster University president Patrick Dean, and David Price, the chair of the Department of Family Medicine, various politicians, and city and university officials, talked about the potential of the cooperative work that will occur between McMaster medical students and the city’s health care professionals.

Price talked about how the facility, across the street from City Hall, is a “unique collaboration between primary care and public health.”

It’s projected there will be about 450 medical staff located in the six-storey, 192,000-square-foot facility. They will be joined by an additional 110 public health staff from the city. McMaster University officials estimate there will be about 50,000 patient interactions annually at the facility.

McMaster officials say first-year nursing students will use the building, while 30 medical residents will have a four-month stay at the clinic. The 80 Hamilton-based residents will spend at least one day a week at the facility, while 200 residents in McMaster University’s medical school will get a minimum of six clinical days at the campus.

“What we will do now is increase health care to citizens and then increase our research base and everything will work together,” said Braley. “I understand there are 100 patients in the first week here. That is quite an achievement.”

The building itself, which sparked superlative comments from all the assembled guests, is a testament to the design’s attempt to make the entire structure welcoming and interactive for patients and the staff that will be working in the environment.

The main floor has enough space to host a coffee shop, pharmacy and a garden. A large, dominate wooden staircase leads to the second floor. To the right is a large lecture hall that looks out over Main Street and City Hall, with a capacity to sit 240 people. There are 11 classrooms on the second floor, and 48 exam rooms on the third floor. The clinic on the third floor has space enough for an aquarium in the waiting room.

Doctors have no offices, but they have access to shared spaces and open meeting rooms.

“It’s a terrific looking building,” said Braley. “It’s beautiful.”

Not only is the structure striking, but it’s in a prime location, said Braley, which will provide access for patients, while also contributing to the downtown’s revitalization.

“The location is absolutely critical,” said Braley. “It’s part of the economic development of the downtown on King Street and on to Jackson Square, the Convention Centre and Copps Coliseum. It’s absolutely important.”

Neil Everson, executive director of the city’s economic development department said the building will provide visitors with a vastly different view on Hamilton.

“It’s a domino effect with an institution like this,” said Everson, as work continues on the former Federal Building down Main Street to convert it into condominiums. “It’s something to see that happen.”

Braley, who was surprised as anybody that McMaster named the building after him, contributed $10 million to the facility. The donation was part of his $50 million contribution to the university he made in 2007.

“I did not ask for my name to be on this building,” said Braley. “I’m very honoured.”

The city of Hamilton provided $20 million to the building, as did the province of Ontario, while McMaster University also contributed to the cost.