Not a game of goons

Community May 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

It’s a contact sport — but it’s not a violent one.

That’s the message the Hamilton Hornets Rugby Football Club is trying to get across as it expands its youth programs.

“Our goal as coaches and as a club is to break the stereotype,” says Alex Paris, head coach for the Hornets’ senior women’s team. “It’s not a game of goonery.”

Statistically, he says, rugby is one of the safest sports to play.

There is a great sense of sportsmanship in rugby, adds Scott Hendry, assistant coach for the senior men’s team. Players have to conduct themselves with honour because athletes from both sides are expected to sit down as friends after a game.

Hendry describes rugby as a game similar to chess, as one has to look at the whole field and see where the play is going.

“You have to know what’s happening in front of you and anticipate a few moves ahead,” he says.

The Hornets are trying to expand the sport of rugby in Hamilton. By developing players at an early age, it will help the senior teams down the road, says Paris.

Rugby is also a great way to stay active or increase fitness as the play is fast-paced with few stoppages compared to a game like football.

The Hornets have co-ed teams in three age brackets for children ages 5 to 12, who compete in no-contact games similar to flag football.

Beginning with the U14 team, both boys and girls teams are offered and the mechanics of tackling are introduced.

Paris notes that rugby is the only sport where men and women compete under the exact same rules and on the same sized fields.

This year, the Hornets have started a U21 as some men leave the game after age 18 because they don’t yet have the size to compete on the senior team.

“By instituting an under-21 side, we’re hoping to retain more players,” says Hendry.

The Hornets are also working with high school teams to help players develop and expand interest in the game.

On Monday, from 6:30-8:30 p.m., the Hornets are holding registration for the minor and junior teams at their clubhouse at Mohawk Sports Park (Upper Kenilworth and Landron avenues). Fees range from $125 at the youngest age bracket to $236.50 in the older divisions. Jersey, shorts and socks are included; assistance is available for families that can’t afford the fees.

There will be teams on the field practising Monday and personnel will be available to answer questions. A second in-person registration is being held June 15; online registration is ongoing at hamiltonrugby.com.

Not a game of goons

Hamilton Hornets want to correct misconceptions about rugby

Community May 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

It’s a contact sport — but it’s not a violent one.

That’s the message the Hamilton Hornets Rugby Football Club is trying to get across as it expands its youth programs.

“Our goal as coaches and as a club is to break the stereotype,” says Alex Paris, head coach for the Hornets’ senior women’s team. “It’s not a game of goonery.”

Statistically, he says, rugby is one of the safest sports to play.

Our goal as coaches and as a club is to break the stereotype.

There is a great sense of sportsmanship in rugby, adds Scott Hendry, assistant coach for the senior men’s team. Players have to conduct themselves with honour because athletes from both sides are expected to sit down as friends after a game.

Hendry describes rugby as a game similar to chess, as one has to look at the whole field and see where the play is going.

“You have to know what’s happening in front of you and anticipate a few moves ahead,” he says.

The Hornets are trying to expand the sport of rugby in Hamilton. By developing players at an early age, it will help the senior teams down the road, says Paris.

Rugby is also a great way to stay active or increase fitness as the play is fast-paced with few stoppages compared to a game like football.

The Hornets have co-ed teams in three age brackets for children ages 5 to 12, who compete in no-contact games similar to flag football.

Beginning with the U14 team, both boys and girls teams are offered and the mechanics of tackling are introduced.

Paris notes that rugby is the only sport where men and women compete under the exact same rules and on the same sized fields.

This year, the Hornets have started a U21 as some men leave the game after age 18 because they don’t yet have the size to compete on the senior team.

“By instituting an under-21 side, we’re hoping to retain more players,” says Hendry.

The Hornets are also working with high school teams to help players develop and expand interest in the game.

On Monday, from 6:30-8:30 p.m., the Hornets are holding registration for the minor and junior teams at their clubhouse at Mohawk Sports Park (Upper Kenilworth and Landron avenues). Fees range from $125 at the youngest age bracket to $236.50 in the older divisions. Jersey, shorts and socks are included; assistance is available for families that can’t afford the fees.

There will be teams on the field practising Monday and personnel will be available to answer questions. A second in-person registration is being held June 15; online registration is ongoing at hamiltonrugby.com.

Not a game of goons

Hamilton Hornets want to correct misconceptions about rugby

Community May 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

It’s a contact sport — but it’s not a violent one.

That’s the message the Hamilton Hornets Rugby Football Club is trying to get across as it expands its youth programs.

“Our goal as coaches and as a club is to break the stereotype,” says Alex Paris, head coach for the Hornets’ senior women’s team. “It’s not a game of goonery.”

Statistically, he says, rugby is one of the safest sports to play.

Our goal as coaches and as a club is to break the stereotype.

There is a great sense of sportsmanship in rugby, adds Scott Hendry, assistant coach for the senior men’s team. Players have to conduct themselves with honour because athletes from both sides are expected to sit down as friends after a game.

Hendry describes rugby as a game similar to chess, as one has to look at the whole field and see where the play is going.

“You have to know what’s happening in front of you and anticipate a few moves ahead,” he says.

The Hornets are trying to expand the sport of rugby in Hamilton. By developing players at an early age, it will help the senior teams down the road, says Paris.

Rugby is also a great way to stay active or increase fitness as the play is fast-paced with few stoppages compared to a game like football.

The Hornets have co-ed teams in three age brackets for children ages 5 to 12, who compete in no-contact games similar to flag football.

Beginning with the U14 team, both boys and girls teams are offered and the mechanics of tackling are introduced.

Paris notes that rugby is the only sport where men and women compete under the exact same rules and on the same sized fields.

This year, the Hornets have started a U21 as some men leave the game after age 18 because they don’t yet have the size to compete on the senior team.

“By instituting an under-21 side, we’re hoping to retain more players,” says Hendry.

The Hornets are also working with high school teams to help players develop and expand interest in the game.

On Monday, from 6:30-8:30 p.m., the Hornets are holding registration for the minor and junior teams at their clubhouse at Mohawk Sports Park (Upper Kenilworth and Landron avenues). Fees range from $125 at the youngest age bracket to $236.50 in the older divisions. Jersey, shorts and socks are included; assistance is available for families that can’t afford the fees.

There will be teams on the field practising Monday and personnel will be available to answer questions. A second in-person registration is being held June 15; online registration is ongoing at hamiltonrugby.com.