25 years of inclusion on Hamilton Mountain

Community Apr 27, 2015 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It was a very special birthday party on the east Mountain.

Some 200 players and supporters gathered at the Huntington Park Recreation Centre March 26 to celebrate 25 years of Hamilton Challenger Baseball.

Denise McArthur, one of the group’s founders, said it all began as a way to give adults and young people with special needs a chance to get outside and play a little baseball.

“We had a number of parents come to us and say ‘there’s all kinds of baseball leagues in the city but my kid can’t participate for whatever reason’,” recalled the therapeutic recreationist with Hamilton Health Sciences.

McArthur said a public meeting was held and what would become the Hamilton Challenger Baseball Association began playing at a small park on the west Mountain.

“For that first season we had 30 participants,” said McArthur, who noted the group has grown to 180 players in three streams. “We have a non-competitive stream, we have a junior stream and we have a competitive stream.”

For many players the recreational part of the league is almost secondary to the socialization, a chance to get out at least once a week.

“Meeting new friends and having fun,” said 31-year-old Jenni Lyne Letourneau, is what keeps her coming back each season.

The 31-year-old east end resident has been playing Challenger Baseball for the past 10 years.

“To be able to play a sport with other people,” said 36-year-old Dundas resident Mark Webster, who has been with the group since the first season.

“Talking to the players every week and making new friends,” added Larry Hall, a 43-year-old east Mountain resident who has been playing Challenger Baseball for 23 years.

As part of the group’s 25th anniversary celebrations McArthur said they are planning to take in some of the Parapan Am events in the Toronto area in August.

“That’s a huge piece for our players,” she said. “To be able to see athletes who have some type of special needs like themselves to be able to get to that elite level, it gives them something to emulate.”

For a $100 registration fee, Challenger Baseball players get a uniform, their spring-summer game season and a number of special events.

McArthur said they are still taking registrations and anyone who would like to give the group a try is invited to some out for one game to see if they like it.

See: hcba.on.ca for more information.

The 2015 opening day is slated for May 31st at Inch Park, the association’s home for the past several years.

25 years of inclusion on Hamilton Mountain

Challenger Baseball marks a quarter century this year

Community Apr 27, 2015 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It was a very special birthday party on the east Mountain.

Some 200 players and supporters gathered at the Huntington Park Recreation Centre March 26 to celebrate 25 years of Hamilton Challenger Baseball.

Denise McArthur, one of the group’s founders, said it all began as a way to give adults and young people with special needs a chance to get outside and play a little baseball.

“We had a number of parents come to us and say ‘there’s all kinds of baseball leagues in the city but my kid can’t participate for whatever reason’,” recalled the therapeutic recreationist with Hamilton Health Sciences.

McArthur said a public meeting was held and what would become the Hamilton Challenger Baseball Association began playing at a small park on the west Mountain.

“For that first season we had 30 participants,” said McArthur, who noted the group has grown to 180 players in three streams. “We have a non-competitive stream, we have a junior stream and we have a competitive stream.”

For many players the recreational part of the league is almost secondary to the socialization, a chance to get out at least once a week.

“Meeting new friends and having fun,” said 31-year-old Jenni Lyne Letourneau, is what keeps her coming back each season.

The 31-year-old east end resident has been playing Challenger Baseball for the past 10 years.

“To be able to play a sport with other people,” said 36-year-old Dundas resident Mark Webster, who has been with the group since the first season.

“Talking to the players every week and making new friends,” added Larry Hall, a 43-year-old east Mountain resident who has been playing Challenger Baseball for 23 years.

As part of the group’s 25th anniversary celebrations McArthur said they are planning to take in some of the Parapan Am events in the Toronto area in August.

“That’s a huge piece for our players,” she said. “To be able to see athletes who have some type of special needs like themselves to be able to get to that elite level, it gives them something to emulate.”

For a $100 registration fee, Challenger Baseball players get a uniform, their spring-summer game season and a number of special events.

McArthur said they are still taking registrations and anyone who would like to give the group a try is invited to some out for one game to see if they like it.

See: hcba.on.ca for more information.

The 2015 opening day is slated for May 31st at Inch Park, the association’s home for the past several years.

25 years of inclusion on Hamilton Mountain

Challenger Baseball marks a quarter century this year

Community Apr 27, 2015 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It was a very special birthday party on the east Mountain.

Some 200 players and supporters gathered at the Huntington Park Recreation Centre March 26 to celebrate 25 years of Hamilton Challenger Baseball.

Denise McArthur, one of the group’s founders, said it all began as a way to give adults and young people with special needs a chance to get outside and play a little baseball.

“We had a number of parents come to us and say ‘there’s all kinds of baseball leagues in the city but my kid can’t participate for whatever reason’,” recalled the therapeutic recreationist with Hamilton Health Sciences.

McArthur said a public meeting was held and what would become the Hamilton Challenger Baseball Association began playing at a small park on the west Mountain.

“For that first season we had 30 participants,” said McArthur, who noted the group has grown to 180 players in three streams. “We have a non-competitive stream, we have a junior stream and we have a competitive stream.”

For many players the recreational part of the league is almost secondary to the socialization, a chance to get out at least once a week.

“Meeting new friends and having fun,” said 31-year-old Jenni Lyne Letourneau, is what keeps her coming back each season.

The 31-year-old east end resident has been playing Challenger Baseball for the past 10 years.

“To be able to play a sport with other people,” said 36-year-old Dundas resident Mark Webster, who has been with the group since the first season.

“Talking to the players every week and making new friends,” added Larry Hall, a 43-year-old east Mountain resident who has been playing Challenger Baseball for 23 years.

As part of the group’s 25th anniversary celebrations McArthur said they are planning to take in some of the Parapan Am events in the Toronto area in August.

“That’s a huge piece for our players,” she said. “To be able to see athletes who have some type of special needs like themselves to be able to get to that elite level, it gives them something to emulate.”

For a $100 registration fee, Challenger Baseball players get a uniform, their spring-summer game season and a number of special events.

McArthur said they are still taking registrations and anyone who would like to give the group a try is invited to some out for one game to see if they like it.

See: hcba.on.ca for more information.

The 2015 opening day is slated for May 31st at Inch Park, the association’s home for the past several years.