Residents offer Hamilton Health Sciences advice for future care

Community Apr 24, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Shorter wait times, more frontline workers and patient advocates were among the visions suggested to Hamilton Health Sciences during a public forum on its strategic plan at Sherwood library.

About 20 people came out to the April 22 “Our Healthy Future” forum, one of 10 the HHS is holding as it prepares a long-term strategic plan.

The forums stem from CEO Rob MacIsaac’s idea upon his arrival a year ago to create a long-term strategic plan for the HHS’s six hospitals and six specialized facilities.

At the forum, attendees were separated into small groups to share their experiences with the health-care system. Each group came up with an outline of a problem and a suggestion on how to resolve it.

To reduce emergency department wait times, for example, it was suggested there be a way to triage patients to urgent care centres if their needs aren’t severe.

In order to help increase patients’ trust in the system, and keep them from getting confused about what is happening to them, it was recommended an advocate follow a patient from pre-admission to discharge and subsequent follow-up. That would make it easier on the patient as there would be one specific person to answer their queries or direct them to the person who can provide the information they seek.

The “treasure trove” of information drawn from the public will be looked at by the HHS, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and other health-care organizations, said Aaron Levo, vice-president of communications.

The HHS will use the information in planning its facilities and what services it offers.

“People who have an experience with wait times have other issues they’re also concerned about and we want to try and put those together … and bring that series of concerns into our planning process,” said Levo.

“I think money could be can answer to a lot of things, but sometimes there are things we can do without additional investment to improve wait times or to make service better to improve the patient experience.”

A report will be releasd around the end of the year, said Levo.

Residents offer Hamilton Health Sciences advice for future care

Strategic plan input at “Our Healthy Future” forums

Community Apr 24, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Shorter wait times, more frontline workers and patient advocates were among the visions suggested to Hamilton Health Sciences during a public forum on its strategic plan at Sherwood library.

About 20 people came out to the April 22 “Our Healthy Future” forum, one of 10 the HHS is holding as it prepares a long-term strategic plan.

The forums stem from CEO Rob MacIsaac’s idea upon his arrival a year ago to create a long-term strategic plan for the HHS’s six hospitals and six specialized facilities.

At the forum, attendees were separated into small groups to share their experiences with the health-care system. Each group came up with an outline of a problem and a suggestion on how to resolve it.

To reduce emergency department wait times, for example, it was suggested there be a way to triage patients to urgent care centres if their needs aren’t severe.

In order to help increase patients’ trust in the system, and keep them from getting confused about what is happening to them, it was recommended an advocate follow a patient from pre-admission to discharge and subsequent follow-up. That would make it easier on the patient as there would be one specific person to answer their queries or direct them to the person who can provide the information they seek.

The “treasure trove” of information drawn from the public will be looked at by the HHS, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and other health-care organizations, said Aaron Levo, vice-president of communications.

The HHS will use the information in planning its facilities and what services it offers.

“People who have an experience with wait times have other issues they’re also concerned about and we want to try and put those together … and bring that series of concerns into our planning process,” said Levo.

“I think money could be can answer to a lot of things, but sometimes there are things we can do without additional investment to improve wait times or to make service better to improve the patient experience.”

A report will be releasd around the end of the year, said Levo.

Residents offer Hamilton Health Sciences advice for future care

Strategic plan input at “Our Healthy Future” forums

Community Apr 24, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Shorter wait times, more frontline workers and patient advocates were among the visions suggested to Hamilton Health Sciences during a public forum on its strategic plan at Sherwood library.

About 20 people came out to the April 22 “Our Healthy Future” forum, one of 10 the HHS is holding as it prepares a long-term strategic plan.

The forums stem from CEO Rob MacIsaac’s idea upon his arrival a year ago to create a long-term strategic plan for the HHS’s six hospitals and six specialized facilities.

At the forum, attendees were separated into small groups to share their experiences with the health-care system. Each group came up with an outline of a problem and a suggestion on how to resolve it.

To reduce emergency department wait times, for example, it was suggested there be a way to triage patients to urgent care centres if their needs aren’t severe.

In order to help increase patients’ trust in the system, and keep them from getting confused about what is happening to them, it was recommended an advocate follow a patient from pre-admission to discharge and subsequent follow-up. That would make it easier on the patient as there would be one specific person to answer their queries or direct them to the person who can provide the information they seek.

The “treasure trove” of information drawn from the public will be looked at by the HHS, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and other health-care organizations, said Aaron Levo, vice-president of communications.

The HHS will use the information in planning its facilities and what services it offers.

“People who have an experience with wait times have other issues they’re also concerned about and we want to try and put those together … and bring that series of concerns into our planning process,” said Levo.

“I think money could be can answer to a lot of things, but sometimes there are things we can do without additional investment to improve wait times or to make service better to improve the patient experience.”

A report will be releasd around the end of the year, said Levo.