Good Samaritans on a mission

Community Apr 07, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes

News staff

If all goes as planned, Vasie Papadopoulos and some good-hearted friends will be helping a few hundred children in Mongolia this summer.

She’ll be leading a group of 14 volunteers from Hamilton and the GTA to a remote area of the Asian country to help build an addition at a school.

The current building was erected in the 1950s and no longer meets the needs of the community, she says.

“It hasn’t been renovated in any way to accommodate the more than 550 students that currently go there,” says Papadopoulos.

“Some of the missing elements right now are as basic as indoor toilets.”

The volunteers, including Hamiltonians Maureen Teloniatis and Nicole Kennedy, will spend two weeks in July in the Khovd district of western Mongolia, where they will be working with Building Trust International and World Vision Mongolia.

They have committed to raising $20,000 to cover a portion of the $60,000 addition, which will house about 100 students (see indiegogo.com/projects/ourwrite).

Papadopoulos grew up in Hamilton — she was “Police chief for a day” in 1990 while attending James Macdonald elementary school and “Mayor for a day” two years later — and recently returned to the west Mountain after spending time in Scotland, Ottawa and Toronto.

In recent years she and her husband have been involved in many Habitat for Humanity projects for many years, in countries such as Nicaragua, Cambodia and Trinidad-Tobago

Last year, Papadopoulos worked with Building Trust International in Cambodia.

This year, she decided to take a different path than home construction.

“We wanted to take on a project that spoke to literacy,” says Papadopoulos.

Educating children, especially girls, is crucial for the economic growth and development of poor countries, she notes.

The addition will be built on a design submitted during a worldwide competition. The winner will be selected May 1. Building Trust International works with local architects and takes into account unique problems in a region such as flooding.

Before the group arrives, says Papadopoulos, the foundation should be laid. Construction of the addition should be completed during the two weeks they are on site.

Good Samaritans on a mission

Community Apr 07, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes

News staff

If all goes as planned, Vasie Papadopoulos and some good-hearted friends will be helping a few hundred children in Mongolia this summer.

She’ll be leading a group of 14 volunteers from Hamilton and the GTA to a remote area of the Asian country to help build an addition at a school.

The current building was erected in the 1950s and no longer meets the needs of the community, she says.

“It hasn’t been renovated in any way to accommodate the more than 550 students that currently go there,” says Papadopoulos.

“Some of the missing elements right now are as basic as indoor toilets.”

The volunteers, including Hamiltonians Maureen Teloniatis and Nicole Kennedy, will spend two weeks in July in the Khovd district of western Mongolia, where they will be working with Building Trust International and World Vision Mongolia.

They have committed to raising $20,000 to cover a portion of the $60,000 addition, which will house about 100 students (see indiegogo.com/projects/ourwrite).

Papadopoulos grew up in Hamilton — she was “Police chief for a day” in 1990 while attending James Macdonald elementary school and “Mayor for a day” two years later — and recently returned to the west Mountain after spending time in Scotland, Ottawa and Toronto.

In recent years she and her husband have been involved in many Habitat for Humanity projects for many years, in countries such as Nicaragua, Cambodia and Trinidad-Tobago

Last year, Papadopoulos worked with Building Trust International in Cambodia.

This year, she decided to take a different path than home construction.

“We wanted to take on a project that spoke to literacy,” says Papadopoulos.

Educating children, especially girls, is crucial for the economic growth and development of poor countries, she notes.

The addition will be built on a design submitted during a worldwide competition. The winner will be selected May 1. Building Trust International works with local architects and takes into account unique problems in a region such as flooding.

Before the group arrives, says Papadopoulos, the foundation should be laid. Construction of the addition should be completed during the two weeks they are on site.

Good Samaritans on a mission

Community Apr 07, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes

News staff

If all goes as planned, Vasie Papadopoulos and some good-hearted friends will be helping a few hundred children in Mongolia this summer.

She’ll be leading a group of 14 volunteers from Hamilton and the GTA to a remote area of the Asian country to help build an addition at a school.

The current building was erected in the 1950s and no longer meets the needs of the community, she says.

“It hasn’t been renovated in any way to accommodate the more than 550 students that currently go there,” says Papadopoulos.

“Some of the missing elements right now are as basic as indoor toilets.”

The volunteers, including Hamiltonians Maureen Teloniatis and Nicole Kennedy, will spend two weeks in July in the Khovd district of western Mongolia, where they will be working with Building Trust International and World Vision Mongolia.

They have committed to raising $20,000 to cover a portion of the $60,000 addition, which will house about 100 students (see indiegogo.com/projects/ourwrite).

Papadopoulos grew up in Hamilton — she was “Police chief for a day” in 1990 while attending James Macdonald elementary school and “Mayor for a day” two years later — and recently returned to the west Mountain after spending time in Scotland, Ottawa and Toronto.

In recent years she and her husband have been involved in many Habitat for Humanity projects for many years, in countries such as Nicaragua, Cambodia and Trinidad-Tobago

Last year, Papadopoulos worked with Building Trust International in Cambodia.

This year, she decided to take a different path than home construction.

“We wanted to take on a project that spoke to literacy,” says Papadopoulos.

Educating children, especially girls, is crucial for the economic growth and development of poor countries, she notes.

The addition will be built on a design submitted during a worldwide competition. The winner will be selected May 1. Building Trust International works with local architects and takes into account unique problems in a region such as flooding.

Before the group arrives, says Papadopoulos, the foundation should be laid. Construction of the addition should be completed during the two weeks they are on site.