Prepare for visitors, residents told at Scarborough Pan Am meeting

Community Apr 08, 2015 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough will see a lot of visitors during the Toronto 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games but no closed roads or security barriers, residents heard this week.

“We haven’t thought of everything, but we’ve thought of a lot,” Doug Spooner, a senior manager of transportation planning for the Games told an audience Tuesday, April 7, evening beside the competition pool at the Toronto Pan Am Sport Centre, to be known as the CIBC Pan Am and Parapan Am Aquatics Centre and Field House during the Games.

“The world’s watching, and if we can do it without road closures I think that’s a pretty good plan.”

But managing extra traffic for the games will be a huge task, and drivers will notice changes weeks before the opening ceremonies on July 10.

Part of the Games Route Network from June 29 to Aug. 18 are 235 kilometres of temporary high-occupancy vehicle lanes.

Anyone can use them, provide they have three people in their vehicle, or two during Parapan, but organizers will be urging drivers to reduce, re-time and re-route car trips, while taking transit wherever possible.

Spooner said the Games’ transport plan “is really conscious of the impacts here in Scarborough,” where there won’t be any local closures.

Timing for five sets of traffic signals (three along Morningside Avenue, two on Old Kingston Road) will be adjusted to help drivers reach the Aquatics Centre and the Games’ tennis venue in nearby the Highland Creek valley.

There will be extra bus service to both from Kennedy Station, Don Mills Station and Rouge Hill GO Station, ending at an unused bus loop on Morningside by the Instructional Centre (IC) building at University of Toronto Scarborough.

Best of all, Spooner added, if you have tickets to a Games event, transit is included.

Toronto Police Const. Craig Brister of the Games’ Integrated Security Unit assured people the Games - one of the largest events ever staged in Canada - will be nothing like Toronto’s G-20, the 2010 summit of world leaders which brought a hardened security zone to the downtown and resulted in riots.

“G-20 was a security event. This is a sporting event,” said Brister, adding the Games also don’t seem to draw the same “political friction” as the Olympic Games, which require tighter security.

He also said police services will continue normally during the Games.

The Pan Am Games Torch Run from May 30 to July 10 and its events - including a celebration in the Aquatic Centre parking lot on Sunday, July 5 - may also tie up traffic around them.

By mid-May, organizers say, a phone app will be available to help people plan car and transit trips during games.

Maps for the Games and special traffic measures are posted at Ontario.ca/games2015.

The policing unit can be reached at 1-844-477-2626 or through ICL.PanParapanAm@opp.ca Also, a twitter account @TPSPanAm2015 and a Facebook page will post maps and warn of delays.

Residents can also send any Games-related question to residentinfo@Toronto2015.org

Scarborough residents at Tuesday’s information session seemed to have few concerns.

One local councillor, Paul Ainslie, said some residents are asking about possible traffic congestion, but he’s confident lots of planning has been done. “I don’t tell people to stay home,” he said.

On Wednesday, Ron Moeser, the councillor representing neighbourhoods around the two Scarborough venues said he thought plans “could have been a little more detailed” on how the Games may affect them.

Moeser said he expects some calls about blocked driveways and parking restrictions, but agreed the Games have already brought benefits to the area.

“You can’t absolutely cover everything,” he said. “You hope there’s a cooperation on both sides.”

Prepare for visitors, residents told at Scarborough Pan Am meeting

Transportation, security among issues discussed

Community Apr 08, 2015 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough will see a lot of visitors during the Toronto 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games but no closed roads or security barriers, residents heard this week.

“We haven’t thought of everything, but we’ve thought of a lot,” Doug Spooner, a senior manager of transportation planning for the Games told an audience Tuesday, April 7, evening beside the competition pool at the Toronto Pan Am Sport Centre, to be known as the CIBC Pan Am and Parapan Am Aquatics Centre and Field House during the Games.

“The world’s watching, and if we can do it without road closures I think that’s a pretty good plan.”

But managing extra traffic for the games will be a huge task, and drivers will notice changes weeks before the opening ceremonies on July 10.

Part of the Games Route Network from June 29 to Aug. 18 are 235 kilometres of temporary high-occupancy vehicle lanes.

Anyone can use them, provide they have three people in their vehicle, or two during Parapan, but organizers will be urging drivers to reduce, re-time and re-route car trips, while taking transit wherever possible.

Spooner said the Games’ transport plan “is really conscious of the impacts here in Scarborough,” where there won’t be any local closures.

Timing for five sets of traffic signals (three along Morningside Avenue, two on Old Kingston Road) will be adjusted to help drivers reach the Aquatics Centre and the Games’ tennis venue in nearby the Highland Creek valley.

There will be extra bus service to both from Kennedy Station, Don Mills Station and Rouge Hill GO Station, ending at an unused bus loop on Morningside by the Instructional Centre (IC) building at University of Toronto Scarborough.

Best of all, Spooner added, if you have tickets to a Games event, transit is included.

Toronto Police Const. Craig Brister of the Games’ Integrated Security Unit assured people the Games - one of the largest events ever staged in Canada - will be nothing like Toronto’s G-20, the 2010 summit of world leaders which brought a hardened security zone to the downtown and resulted in riots.

“G-20 was a security event. This is a sporting event,” said Brister, adding the Games also don’t seem to draw the same “political friction” as the Olympic Games, which require tighter security.

He also said police services will continue normally during the Games.

The Pan Am Games Torch Run from May 30 to July 10 and its events - including a celebration in the Aquatic Centre parking lot on Sunday, July 5 - may also tie up traffic around them.

By mid-May, organizers say, a phone app will be available to help people plan car and transit trips during games.

Maps for the Games and special traffic measures are posted at Ontario.ca/games2015.

The policing unit can be reached at 1-844-477-2626 or through ICL.PanParapanAm@opp.ca Also, a twitter account @TPSPanAm2015 and a Facebook page will post maps and warn of delays.

Residents can also send any Games-related question to residentinfo@Toronto2015.org

Scarborough residents at Tuesday’s information session seemed to have few concerns.

One local councillor, Paul Ainslie, said some residents are asking about possible traffic congestion, but he’s confident lots of planning has been done. “I don’t tell people to stay home,” he said.

On Wednesday, Ron Moeser, the councillor representing neighbourhoods around the two Scarborough venues said he thought plans “could have been a little more detailed” on how the Games may affect them.

Moeser said he expects some calls about blocked driveways and parking restrictions, but agreed the Games have already brought benefits to the area.

“You can’t absolutely cover everything,” he said. “You hope there’s a cooperation on both sides.”

Prepare for visitors, residents told at Scarborough Pan Am meeting

Transportation, security among issues discussed

Community Apr 08, 2015 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough will see a lot of visitors during the Toronto 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games but no closed roads or security barriers, residents heard this week.

“We haven’t thought of everything, but we’ve thought of a lot,” Doug Spooner, a senior manager of transportation planning for the Games told an audience Tuesday, April 7, evening beside the competition pool at the Toronto Pan Am Sport Centre, to be known as the CIBC Pan Am and Parapan Am Aquatics Centre and Field House during the Games.

“The world’s watching, and if we can do it without road closures I think that’s a pretty good plan.”

But managing extra traffic for the games will be a huge task, and drivers will notice changes weeks before the opening ceremonies on July 10.

Part of the Games Route Network from June 29 to Aug. 18 are 235 kilometres of temporary high-occupancy vehicle lanes.

Anyone can use them, provide they have three people in their vehicle, or two during Parapan, but organizers will be urging drivers to reduce, re-time and re-route car trips, while taking transit wherever possible.

Spooner said the Games’ transport plan “is really conscious of the impacts here in Scarborough,” where there won’t be any local closures.

Timing for five sets of traffic signals (three along Morningside Avenue, two on Old Kingston Road) will be adjusted to help drivers reach the Aquatics Centre and the Games’ tennis venue in nearby the Highland Creek valley.

There will be extra bus service to both from Kennedy Station, Don Mills Station and Rouge Hill GO Station, ending at an unused bus loop on Morningside by the Instructional Centre (IC) building at University of Toronto Scarborough.

Best of all, Spooner added, if you have tickets to a Games event, transit is included.

Toronto Police Const. Craig Brister of the Games’ Integrated Security Unit assured people the Games - one of the largest events ever staged in Canada - will be nothing like Toronto’s G-20, the 2010 summit of world leaders which brought a hardened security zone to the downtown and resulted in riots.

“G-20 was a security event. This is a sporting event,” said Brister, adding the Games also don’t seem to draw the same “political friction” as the Olympic Games, which require tighter security.

He also said police services will continue normally during the Games.

The Pan Am Games Torch Run from May 30 to July 10 and its events - including a celebration in the Aquatic Centre parking lot on Sunday, July 5 - may also tie up traffic around them.

By mid-May, organizers say, a phone app will be available to help people plan car and transit trips during games.

Maps for the Games and special traffic measures are posted at Ontario.ca/games2015.

The policing unit can be reached at 1-844-477-2626 or through ICL.PanParapanAm@opp.ca Also, a twitter account @TPSPanAm2015 and a Facebook page will post maps and warn of delays.

Residents can also send any Games-related question to residentinfo@Toronto2015.org

Scarborough residents at Tuesday’s information session seemed to have few concerns.

One local councillor, Paul Ainslie, said some residents are asking about possible traffic congestion, but he’s confident lots of planning has been done. “I don’t tell people to stay home,” he said.

On Wednesday, Ron Moeser, the councillor representing neighbourhoods around the two Scarborough venues said he thought plans “could have been a little more detailed” on how the Games may affect them.

Moeser said he expects some calls about blocked driveways and parking restrictions, but agreed the Games have already brought benefits to the area.

“You can’t absolutely cover everything,” he said. “You hope there’s a cooperation on both sides.”