Hamilton youth, Ohsweken man to run with Pan Am torch

Community Mar 17, 2015 by Steve Milton The Hamilton Spectator

All of a sudden, it has become very real to Denzel Innis and Cameron Sault, which puts them way ahead of most of us.

Innis, a 17-year-old high school football and trumpet player from Hamilton, and Sault a 28-year-old youth worker and Senior A hockey player from Ohsweken, were among the first nine people officially named Monday morning as torch bearers for the Pan Am Games torch relay.

The nine are representative of the 3,000 torch bearers who will carry the Pan Am flame across the country for six weeks before the Games' Opening Ceremonies in Toronto July 10.

The design of the torch and the official shorts and T-shirts its bearers will wear were also revealed at a ceremony at the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto, which was attended by such luminaries as

Olympic triathlon champion Simon Whitfield, honorary torch bearer Chris Hadfield, Toronto Mayor John Tory, Premier Kathleen Wynne, Games head Saad Raafi, and Chief Bryan LaForme of the Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation.

"Honestly, it was great experience," Innis, who is in grade 12 at Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School, said Wednesday. "I met a lot of cool and important people. It was awesome.

"When they first called me (in February) and asked if I wanted to be a torch bearer, I said to myself, 'Sure, cool. I'll do it.'

"But it didn't really start to hit me until today, when I realized I'll be running, and representing Canada. I feel when I get to the actual date, it'll be 'OMG, it's really here!'"

Innis has been told that he'll carry the torch for 200 metres, the standard leg for an international Games' torch relay, in Dundas.

Sault, of the Mississauga of New Credit First Nations, is a former professional hockey player now playing for the Brantford Blast. He works as a child and youth work at Six Nations.

"Once I thought about it a bit, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Sault said of the torch relay. "I'm proud to be able to be part of it for not only myself but for my First Nations and my community.

"I thought that there would just be a couple of photographs and a small ceremony, but it was a real big thing, with all the athletes and dignitaries. It was a real eye-opener and you realize what the Games are going to mean to this province."

The torch will be ignited some time in May during a traditional Aztec ceremony at the Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan, just outside Mexico City, and will then be flown to Toronto. The relay begins there May 30 and will visit 130 communities across Ontario. According to organizers its journey, which includes stops in other parts of Canada, will cover 15,000 kilometres by air and 5,000 on land.

The torch design released Monday features "United We Play" pictograms, colourful renderings of people in motion. The torch is made of aluminum, stands 65 centimetres high and weighs 1.2 kilograms. It has a burn time of 10 to 12 minutes, is visible through most weather conditions, and stays lit in winds of up to 70 kilometres per hour.

Hamilton will spend more time with the torch than most other Pan Am host venues. The relay is scheduled to arrive in the city on June 21, which is National Aboriginal Day, and leave sometime on June 22 from a local celebration at what will be known during the Games as CIBC Hamilton Pan Am Soccer Stadium. Otherwise, we call it Tim Hortons Field.

It was CIBC that nominated Innis as a torch bearer and a company representative presented him to Monday's gathering.

Two years ago, the football and trumpet player was one of five Hamilton Grade 10 students in financial need who were given scholarships as part of the bank's Youthvision Scholarship program, to help fund their eventual university studies.

Innis, who works part-time in the city's recreation department, hopes to study either recreation and leisure or music, leading to a teaching career.

"I get to be one of only about 3,000 people who are carrying this torch," he said. "It's kind of mind-blowing and I'm humbled.

"I think this is an excellent opportunity for Canada to be on the world stage."

smilton@thespec.com

905-526-3268 | @miltonatthespec

Hamilton youth, Ohsweken man to run with Pan Am torch

Community Mar 17, 2015 by Steve Milton The Hamilton Spectator

All of a sudden, it has become very real to Denzel Innis and Cameron Sault, which puts them way ahead of most of us.

Innis, a 17-year-old high school football and trumpet player from Hamilton, and Sault a 28-year-old youth worker and Senior A hockey player from Ohsweken, were among the first nine people officially named Monday morning as torch bearers for the Pan Am Games torch relay.

The nine are representative of the 3,000 torch bearers who will carry the Pan Am flame across the country for six weeks before the Games' Opening Ceremonies in Toronto July 10.

The design of the torch and the official shorts and T-shirts its bearers will wear were also revealed at a ceremony at the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto, which was attended by such luminaries as

Olympic triathlon champion Simon Whitfield, honorary torch bearer Chris Hadfield, Toronto Mayor John Tory, Premier Kathleen Wynne, Games head Saad Raafi, and Chief Bryan LaForme of the Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation.

"Honestly, it was great experience," Innis, who is in grade 12 at Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School, said Wednesday. "I met a lot of cool and important people. It was awesome.

"When they first called me (in February) and asked if I wanted to be a torch bearer, I said to myself, 'Sure, cool. I'll do it.'

"But it didn't really start to hit me until today, when I realized I'll be running, and representing Canada. I feel when I get to the actual date, it'll be 'OMG, it's really here!'"

Innis has been told that he'll carry the torch for 200 metres, the standard leg for an international Games' torch relay, in Dundas.

Sault, of the Mississauga of New Credit First Nations, is a former professional hockey player now playing for the Brantford Blast. He works as a child and youth work at Six Nations.

"Once I thought about it a bit, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Sault said of the torch relay. "I'm proud to be able to be part of it for not only myself but for my First Nations and my community.

"I thought that there would just be a couple of photographs and a small ceremony, but it was a real big thing, with all the athletes and dignitaries. It was a real eye-opener and you realize what the Games are going to mean to this province."

The torch will be ignited some time in May during a traditional Aztec ceremony at the Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan, just outside Mexico City, and will then be flown to Toronto. The relay begins there May 30 and will visit 130 communities across Ontario. According to organizers its journey, which includes stops in other parts of Canada, will cover 15,000 kilometres by air and 5,000 on land.

The torch design released Monday features "United We Play" pictograms, colourful renderings of people in motion. The torch is made of aluminum, stands 65 centimetres high and weighs 1.2 kilograms. It has a burn time of 10 to 12 minutes, is visible through most weather conditions, and stays lit in winds of up to 70 kilometres per hour.

Hamilton will spend more time with the torch than most other Pan Am host venues. The relay is scheduled to arrive in the city on June 21, which is National Aboriginal Day, and leave sometime on June 22 from a local celebration at what will be known during the Games as CIBC Hamilton Pan Am Soccer Stadium. Otherwise, we call it Tim Hortons Field.

It was CIBC that nominated Innis as a torch bearer and a company representative presented him to Monday's gathering.

Two years ago, the football and trumpet player was one of five Hamilton Grade 10 students in financial need who were given scholarships as part of the bank's Youthvision Scholarship program, to help fund their eventual university studies.

Innis, who works part-time in the city's recreation department, hopes to study either recreation and leisure or music, leading to a teaching career.

"I get to be one of only about 3,000 people who are carrying this torch," he said. "It's kind of mind-blowing and I'm humbled.

"I think this is an excellent opportunity for Canada to be on the world stage."

smilton@thespec.com

905-526-3268 | @miltonatthespec

Hamilton youth, Ohsweken man to run with Pan Am torch

Community Mar 17, 2015 by Steve Milton The Hamilton Spectator

All of a sudden, it has become very real to Denzel Innis and Cameron Sault, which puts them way ahead of most of us.

Innis, a 17-year-old high school football and trumpet player from Hamilton, and Sault a 28-year-old youth worker and Senior A hockey player from Ohsweken, were among the first nine people officially named Monday morning as torch bearers for the Pan Am Games torch relay.

The nine are representative of the 3,000 torch bearers who will carry the Pan Am flame across the country for six weeks before the Games' Opening Ceremonies in Toronto July 10.

The design of the torch and the official shorts and T-shirts its bearers will wear were also revealed at a ceremony at the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto, which was attended by such luminaries as

Olympic triathlon champion Simon Whitfield, honorary torch bearer Chris Hadfield, Toronto Mayor John Tory, Premier Kathleen Wynne, Games head Saad Raafi, and Chief Bryan LaForme of the Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation.

"Honestly, it was great experience," Innis, who is in grade 12 at Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School, said Wednesday. "I met a lot of cool and important people. It was awesome.

"When they first called me (in February) and asked if I wanted to be a torch bearer, I said to myself, 'Sure, cool. I'll do it.'

"But it didn't really start to hit me until today, when I realized I'll be running, and representing Canada. I feel when I get to the actual date, it'll be 'OMG, it's really here!'"

Innis has been told that he'll carry the torch for 200 metres, the standard leg for an international Games' torch relay, in Dundas.

Sault, of the Mississauga of New Credit First Nations, is a former professional hockey player now playing for the Brantford Blast. He works as a child and youth work at Six Nations.

"Once I thought about it a bit, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Sault said of the torch relay. "I'm proud to be able to be part of it for not only myself but for my First Nations and my community.

"I thought that there would just be a couple of photographs and a small ceremony, but it was a real big thing, with all the athletes and dignitaries. It was a real eye-opener and you realize what the Games are going to mean to this province."

The torch will be ignited some time in May during a traditional Aztec ceremony at the Pyramid of the Sun in Teotihuacan, just outside Mexico City, and will then be flown to Toronto. The relay begins there May 30 and will visit 130 communities across Ontario. According to organizers its journey, which includes stops in other parts of Canada, will cover 15,000 kilometres by air and 5,000 on land.

The torch design released Monday features "United We Play" pictograms, colourful renderings of people in motion. The torch is made of aluminum, stands 65 centimetres high and weighs 1.2 kilograms. It has a burn time of 10 to 12 minutes, is visible through most weather conditions, and stays lit in winds of up to 70 kilometres per hour.

Hamilton will spend more time with the torch than most other Pan Am host venues. The relay is scheduled to arrive in the city on June 21, which is National Aboriginal Day, and leave sometime on June 22 from a local celebration at what will be known during the Games as CIBC Hamilton Pan Am Soccer Stadium. Otherwise, we call it Tim Hortons Field.

It was CIBC that nominated Innis as a torch bearer and a company representative presented him to Monday's gathering.

Two years ago, the football and trumpet player was one of five Hamilton Grade 10 students in financial need who were given scholarships as part of the bank's Youthvision Scholarship program, to help fund their eventual university studies.

Innis, who works part-time in the city's recreation department, hopes to study either recreation and leisure or music, leading to a teaching career.

"I get to be one of only about 3,000 people who are carrying this torch," he said. "It's kind of mind-blowing and I'm humbled.

"I think this is an excellent opportunity for Canada to be on the world stage."

smilton@thespec.com

905-526-3268 | @miltonatthespec