West Park hosts sitting volleyball demo in advance of Parapan Am Games

Community Mar 05, 2015 by Fannie Sunshine York Guardian

Jamoi Anderson thought he’d come down with the flu when he fell ill in October 2008.

The mystery viral infection, which doctors were never able to diagnose, quickly turned septic, and the young man suffered multiple organ failure.

The native of Brampton was placed in a month-long induced coma that restricted blood flow to his heart and circulation to his limbs.

Anderson’s left leg got the worst of it, and once he was out of the coma gangrene set it.

Doctors and even a plastic surgeon tried to come up with ways to salvage his leg, but Anderson, who was growing frustrated with the slow process and wanted to get on with life, had a simple solution: just amputate it.

On May 1, 2009, his left leg was amputated six to eight inches below the knee.

“I was already prepared mentally,” he said of his surgery.

An athlete, Anderson had played basketball, football and volleyball for years, and wanted to get back to his way of life.

He started rehab shortly after his leg was removed, and six weeks later received his prosthetic.

“After that, it was just go,” he said.

While rehabilitating at West Park Healthcare Centre near Jane Street and Weston Road, Anderson met a member of the Men’s National Sitting Volleyball Team, who urged him to check out the sport to see if he would be interested in playing.

“I was skeptical because I had just started walking, and now I’m on the ground?” he said. “But I gave in. (Sitting volleyball) is pretty cool.”

Physiotherapist Janet Campbell said sitting volleyball requires a lot of core strength, ground agility and weight shifting.

“You have to be physically fit,” she said.

Part of her job is trying to get people doing the things they need to do and love to do.

“It could be getting back to physical activity, it could be playing a sport they did before,” she said.

According to Volleyball Canada, sitting volleyball is a discipline of disabled volleyball that is played while sitting on the floor. The sport is governed by the same set of rules as the able-bodied game, with a few minor rule modifications.

The sitting volleyball court measures 10 metres by six metres, divided into two sides of five metres deep by six metres wide. The net height is lower than that of able-bodied or standing volleyball, and is set at a height of 1.15 metres for men and 1.05 metres for women.

At the non-international level, sitting volleyball can be played by anyone. For international competition, sitting volleyball is open to athletes with a physical disability who meet the minimum disability requirements for volleyball. An athlete’s disability must be permanent (either progressive or non-progressive). Athletes with progressive physical disabilities (such as muscular dystrophy or multiple sclerosis) are given a temporary classification and must be classified at each competition. While many sitting volleyball athletes at the international level are amputees, the sport can be played by athletes with other types of physical disabilities.

Anderson, 29, started playing four years ago, and for the past three years has been part of the men’s national team, which will complete at the Toronto 2015 Parapan Am Games in August. The goal is to win gold or silver to secure a spot in the 2016 Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

“I’m excited for the opportunity and to compete on home soil,” said Anderson, who has been living recently in the Beach. “It’s the qualifier for Rio. We need to beat the U.S.”

Anderson, an athlete ambassador through ParaSport Ontario who speaks at schools and rehab centres about his experience, said he’s always been a positive person who “sees light in situations, regardless of the situation.

“There’s nothing I can’t do now that I could do before (amputation),” he said. “I rock climb, I ski, I play basketball with able-bodied people.”

Anderson and teammate Andrew Tucker, who will also compete in this summer’s Parapan Am Games, demonstrated sitting volleyball in West Park’s auditorium Thursday, Feb. 26 using able-bodied hospital employees.

Tucker, who like Anderson grew up in Brampton and now resides in the Beach, had his right leg amputated just below the knee in May 2012 after complications from lupus shut down his kidneys and cut off circulation to his limbs.

“It didn’t really bother me,” the Humber College recreation and leisure student said of the amputation. “It bothered my mom more.”

After bumping into Anderson and another member of the Men’s National Sitting Volleyball Team (five members of the team are West Park amputee patients) at West Park, who told him about the volleyball team, Tucker brushed it off; sport wasn’t on his mind. But after a friend of Tucker’s told Anderson and the other member Tucker’s story, the men pursued Tucker to come out for a one-on one-session, and he agreed. The rest is history.

During the demo inside the auditorium, led by Anderson, Tucker and seven able-bodied participants from West Park went through basic sitting volleyball movements (feet in front, legs slightly bent, passing the ball to a partner and then over the net) before they were divided into two teams for a game.

Though the group was off to a shaky start, they appeared more comfortable as the game progressed.

“It got easier,” said participant Eve Huxley, a rehabilitation assistant. “I had a great time. It took a bit to get used to, then I didn’t even notice I was sitting on the ground. It was good fun.”

West Park has posted a video of sitting volleyball, which can be viewed at www.youtube.com/watch?v=97_DRBBGcEE

West Park hosts sitting volleyball demo in advance of Parapan Am Games

Community Mar 05, 2015 by Fannie Sunshine York Guardian

Jamoi Anderson thought he’d come down with the flu when he fell ill in October 2008.

The mystery viral infection, which doctors were never able to diagnose, quickly turned septic, and the young man suffered multiple organ failure.

The native of Brampton was placed in a month-long induced coma that restricted blood flow to his heart and circulation to his limbs.

Anderson’s left leg got the worst of it, and once he was out of the coma gangrene set it.

Doctors and even a plastic surgeon tried to come up with ways to salvage his leg, but Anderson, who was growing frustrated with the slow process and wanted to get on with life, had a simple solution: just amputate it.

On May 1, 2009, his left leg was amputated six to eight inches below the knee.

“I was already prepared mentally,” he said of his surgery.

An athlete, Anderson had played basketball, football and volleyball for years, and wanted to get back to his way of life.

He started rehab shortly after his leg was removed, and six weeks later received his prosthetic.

“After that, it was just go,” he said.

While rehabilitating at West Park Healthcare Centre near Jane Street and Weston Road, Anderson met a member of the Men’s National Sitting Volleyball Team, who urged him to check out the sport to see if he would be interested in playing.

“I was skeptical because I had just started walking, and now I’m on the ground?” he said. “But I gave in. (Sitting volleyball) is pretty cool.”

Physiotherapist Janet Campbell said sitting volleyball requires a lot of core strength, ground agility and weight shifting.

“You have to be physically fit,” she said.

Part of her job is trying to get people doing the things they need to do and love to do.

“It could be getting back to physical activity, it could be playing a sport they did before,” she said.

According to Volleyball Canada, sitting volleyball is a discipline of disabled volleyball that is played while sitting on the floor. The sport is governed by the same set of rules as the able-bodied game, with a few minor rule modifications.

The sitting volleyball court measures 10 metres by six metres, divided into two sides of five metres deep by six metres wide. The net height is lower than that of able-bodied or standing volleyball, and is set at a height of 1.15 metres for men and 1.05 metres for women.

At the non-international level, sitting volleyball can be played by anyone. For international competition, sitting volleyball is open to athletes with a physical disability who meet the minimum disability requirements for volleyball. An athlete’s disability must be permanent (either progressive or non-progressive). Athletes with progressive physical disabilities (such as muscular dystrophy or multiple sclerosis) are given a temporary classification and must be classified at each competition. While many sitting volleyball athletes at the international level are amputees, the sport can be played by athletes with other types of physical disabilities.

Anderson, 29, started playing four years ago, and for the past three years has been part of the men’s national team, which will complete at the Toronto 2015 Parapan Am Games in August. The goal is to win gold or silver to secure a spot in the 2016 Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

“I’m excited for the opportunity and to compete on home soil,” said Anderson, who has been living recently in the Beach. “It’s the qualifier for Rio. We need to beat the U.S.”

Anderson, an athlete ambassador through ParaSport Ontario who speaks at schools and rehab centres about his experience, said he’s always been a positive person who “sees light in situations, regardless of the situation.

“There’s nothing I can’t do now that I could do before (amputation),” he said. “I rock climb, I ski, I play basketball with able-bodied people.”

Anderson and teammate Andrew Tucker, who will also compete in this summer’s Parapan Am Games, demonstrated sitting volleyball in West Park’s auditorium Thursday, Feb. 26 using able-bodied hospital employees.

Tucker, who like Anderson grew up in Brampton and now resides in the Beach, had his right leg amputated just below the knee in May 2012 after complications from lupus shut down his kidneys and cut off circulation to his limbs.

“It didn’t really bother me,” the Humber College recreation and leisure student said of the amputation. “It bothered my mom more.”

After bumping into Anderson and another member of the Men’s National Sitting Volleyball Team (five members of the team are West Park amputee patients) at West Park, who told him about the volleyball team, Tucker brushed it off; sport wasn’t on his mind. But after a friend of Tucker’s told Anderson and the other member Tucker’s story, the men pursued Tucker to come out for a one-on one-session, and he agreed. The rest is history.

During the demo inside the auditorium, led by Anderson, Tucker and seven able-bodied participants from West Park went through basic sitting volleyball movements (feet in front, legs slightly bent, passing the ball to a partner and then over the net) before they were divided into two teams for a game.

Though the group was off to a shaky start, they appeared more comfortable as the game progressed.

“It got easier,” said participant Eve Huxley, a rehabilitation assistant. “I had a great time. It took a bit to get used to, then I didn’t even notice I was sitting on the ground. It was good fun.”

West Park has posted a video of sitting volleyball, which can be viewed at www.youtube.com/watch?v=97_DRBBGcEE

West Park hosts sitting volleyball demo in advance of Parapan Am Games

Community Mar 05, 2015 by Fannie Sunshine York Guardian

Jamoi Anderson thought he’d come down with the flu when he fell ill in October 2008.

The mystery viral infection, which doctors were never able to diagnose, quickly turned septic, and the young man suffered multiple organ failure.

The native of Brampton was placed in a month-long induced coma that restricted blood flow to his heart and circulation to his limbs.

Anderson’s left leg got the worst of it, and once he was out of the coma gangrene set it.

Doctors and even a plastic surgeon tried to come up with ways to salvage his leg, but Anderson, who was growing frustrated with the slow process and wanted to get on with life, had a simple solution: just amputate it.

On May 1, 2009, his left leg was amputated six to eight inches below the knee.

“I was already prepared mentally,” he said of his surgery.

An athlete, Anderson had played basketball, football and volleyball for years, and wanted to get back to his way of life.

He started rehab shortly after his leg was removed, and six weeks later received his prosthetic.

“After that, it was just go,” he said.

While rehabilitating at West Park Healthcare Centre near Jane Street and Weston Road, Anderson met a member of the Men’s National Sitting Volleyball Team, who urged him to check out the sport to see if he would be interested in playing.

“I was skeptical because I had just started walking, and now I’m on the ground?” he said. “But I gave in. (Sitting volleyball) is pretty cool.”

Physiotherapist Janet Campbell said sitting volleyball requires a lot of core strength, ground agility and weight shifting.

“You have to be physically fit,” she said.

Part of her job is trying to get people doing the things they need to do and love to do.

“It could be getting back to physical activity, it could be playing a sport they did before,” she said.

According to Volleyball Canada, sitting volleyball is a discipline of disabled volleyball that is played while sitting on the floor. The sport is governed by the same set of rules as the able-bodied game, with a few minor rule modifications.

The sitting volleyball court measures 10 metres by six metres, divided into two sides of five metres deep by six metres wide. The net height is lower than that of able-bodied or standing volleyball, and is set at a height of 1.15 metres for men and 1.05 metres for women.

At the non-international level, sitting volleyball can be played by anyone. For international competition, sitting volleyball is open to athletes with a physical disability who meet the minimum disability requirements for volleyball. An athlete’s disability must be permanent (either progressive or non-progressive). Athletes with progressive physical disabilities (such as muscular dystrophy or multiple sclerosis) are given a temporary classification and must be classified at each competition. While many sitting volleyball athletes at the international level are amputees, the sport can be played by athletes with other types of physical disabilities.

Anderson, 29, started playing four years ago, and for the past three years has been part of the men’s national team, which will complete at the Toronto 2015 Parapan Am Games in August. The goal is to win gold or silver to secure a spot in the 2016 Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

“I’m excited for the opportunity and to compete on home soil,” said Anderson, who has been living recently in the Beach. “It’s the qualifier for Rio. We need to beat the U.S.”

Anderson, an athlete ambassador through ParaSport Ontario who speaks at schools and rehab centres about his experience, said he’s always been a positive person who “sees light in situations, regardless of the situation.

“There’s nothing I can’t do now that I could do before (amputation),” he said. “I rock climb, I ski, I play basketball with able-bodied people.”

Anderson and teammate Andrew Tucker, who will also compete in this summer’s Parapan Am Games, demonstrated sitting volleyball in West Park’s auditorium Thursday, Feb. 26 using able-bodied hospital employees.

Tucker, who like Anderson grew up in Brampton and now resides in the Beach, had his right leg amputated just below the knee in May 2012 after complications from lupus shut down his kidneys and cut off circulation to his limbs.

“It didn’t really bother me,” the Humber College recreation and leisure student said of the amputation. “It bothered my mom more.”

After bumping into Anderson and another member of the Men’s National Sitting Volleyball Team (five members of the team are West Park amputee patients) at West Park, who told him about the volleyball team, Tucker brushed it off; sport wasn’t on his mind. But after a friend of Tucker’s told Anderson and the other member Tucker’s story, the men pursued Tucker to come out for a one-on one-session, and he agreed. The rest is history.

During the demo inside the auditorium, led by Anderson, Tucker and seven able-bodied participants from West Park went through basic sitting volleyball movements (feet in front, legs slightly bent, passing the ball to a partner and then over the net) before they were divided into two teams for a game.

Though the group was off to a shaky start, they appeared more comfortable as the game progressed.

“It got easier,” said participant Eve Huxley, a rehabilitation assistant. “I had a great time. It took a bit to get used to, then I didn’t even notice I was sitting on the ground. It was good fun.”

West Park has posted a video of sitting volleyball, which can be viewed at www.youtube.com/watch?v=97_DRBBGcEE