Free forum on muscular sclerosis at Carmen’s Wednesday

Community Oct 04, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

At first glance, Hamilton native, Carrie MacLean, appears to be a typical mother. But for this mother of two, being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) means her daily life has not been so ordinary.

MacLean, who will be speaking in at a free educational forum next week, is not alone. MS is the most common neurological disease that affects young adults in Canada, who are most often diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 40. Further, women are four times more likely to develop MS than men.

MacLean is sharing her story about her determination to take control and rise to the challenges of MS on Oct. 8 at Carmen’s Banquet Centre at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Kathryn Giles, a neurologist, will be presenting key information about how to manage relapsing-remitting MS.

MacLean was a 28-year-old newlywed in the prime of her career, working a highly stressful job as an IT team lead. One day in July 2002, she woke up feeling pins and needles on her right side, and within four days, her entire body was numb from her neck down.

She also lost the use of her right hand for several weeks. At the time, her neurologist informed her that there was a 40 per cent chance that she had MS.

Only a few months after the birth of her first daughter in July 2004, MacLean returned to work and suffered a severe attack. She was later formally diagnosed with MS and eventually quit her job to focus on her health. She also decided to delay treatment as she wanted to have another child.

Following the birth of her second daughter in 2006, MacLean went through a period of trying different treatments to manage her MS. After eight years, she finally found a treatment option that works for her.

Today, MacLean feels great and is living well with MS. She sometimes experiences fatigue and pins and needles in her hands and feet when she is tired, but she has not experienced another major attack. She encourages people living with MS to be their own advocate and bring new information to their healthcare providers, including regularly checking in with the MS Society of Canada website for new research and information.

Carmen’s is located at 1520 Stone Church Rd. East.

Free forum on muscular sclerosis at Carmen’s Wednesday

Community Oct 04, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

At first glance, Hamilton native, Carrie MacLean, appears to be a typical mother. But for this mother of two, being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) means her daily life has not been so ordinary.

MacLean, who will be speaking in at a free educational forum next week, is not alone. MS is the most common neurological disease that affects young adults in Canada, who are most often diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 40. Further, women are four times more likely to develop MS than men.

MacLean is sharing her story about her determination to take control and rise to the challenges of MS on Oct. 8 at Carmen’s Banquet Centre at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Kathryn Giles, a neurologist, will be presenting key information about how to manage relapsing-remitting MS.

MacLean was a 28-year-old newlywed in the prime of her career, working a highly stressful job as an IT team lead. One day in July 2002, she woke up feeling pins and needles on her right side, and within four days, her entire body was numb from her neck down.

She also lost the use of her right hand for several weeks. At the time, her neurologist informed her that there was a 40 per cent chance that she had MS.

Only a few months after the birth of her first daughter in July 2004, MacLean returned to work and suffered a severe attack. She was later formally diagnosed with MS and eventually quit her job to focus on her health. She also decided to delay treatment as she wanted to have another child.

Following the birth of her second daughter in 2006, MacLean went through a period of trying different treatments to manage her MS. After eight years, she finally found a treatment option that works for her.

Today, MacLean feels great and is living well with MS. She sometimes experiences fatigue and pins and needles in her hands and feet when she is tired, but she has not experienced another major attack. She encourages people living with MS to be their own advocate and bring new information to their healthcare providers, including regularly checking in with the MS Society of Canada website for new research and information.

Carmen’s is located at 1520 Stone Church Rd. East.

Free forum on muscular sclerosis at Carmen’s Wednesday

Community Oct 04, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

At first glance, Hamilton native, Carrie MacLean, appears to be a typical mother. But for this mother of two, being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) means her daily life has not been so ordinary.

MacLean, who will be speaking in at a free educational forum next week, is not alone. MS is the most common neurological disease that affects young adults in Canada, who are most often diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 40. Further, women are four times more likely to develop MS than men.

MacLean is sharing her story about her determination to take control and rise to the challenges of MS on Oct. 8 at Carmen’s Banquet Centre at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Kathryn Giles, a neurologist, will be presenting key information about how to manage relapsing-remitting MS.

MacLean was a 28-year-old newlywed in the prime of her career, working a highly stressful job as an IT team lead. One day in July 2002, she woke up feeling pins and needles on her right side, and within four days, her entire body was numb from her neck down.

She also lost the use of her right hand for several weeks. At the time, her neurologist informed her that there was a 40 per cent chance that she had MS.

Only a few months after the birth of her first daughter in July 2004, MacLean returned to work and suffered a severe attack. She was later formally diagnosed with MS and eventually quit her job to focus on her health. She also decided to delay treatment as she wanted to have another child.

Following the birth of her second daughter in 2006, MacLean went through a period of trying different treatments to manage her MS. After eight years, she finally found a treatment option that works for her.

Today, MacLean feels great and is living well with MS. She sometimes experiences fatigue and pins and needles in her hands and feet when she is tired, but she has not experienced another major attack. She encourages people living with MS to be their own advocate and bring new information to their healthcare providers, including regularly checking in with the MS Society of Canada website for new research and information.

Carmen’s is located at 1520 Stone Church Rd. East.