Extreme couponing

Community Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Kirsty Clement has some tips that can help you knock a bundle off your weekly grocery bill.

Using websites, smartphone apps and store policies, you can save upwards of 30 per cent off your bill, she says.

“There are all kinds of tricks and tips beyond just using coupons,” she says.

Clement, who will be giving a seminar Sept. 30 on what could be called extreme couponing, says she usually saves 30-50 per cent on her family’s bill. Some weeks it can be as high as 70 per cent.

Her ability to save came somewhat out of necessity after deciding to become a stay-at-home mom.

“I’ve always approached saving money a bit like a competitive sport,” says Clement, a Dundas resident.

“It sort of runs in the family — my mom is the same way.

“Certainly having two kids to feed on more or less a one-income family made saving money even more of a priority.”

You’ll never get paid to buy a product or save 95 per cent on your bill by using coupons like you see on U.S. TV shows, she says. It’s just not possible in Canada.

“You have to mitigate your expectations somewhat if you are a fan of the American show because there are things in the States (such as stacking coupons) that just don’t occur in Canada,” says Clement.

“You’re not going to get $600 worth of groceries for $10 in Canada. It just won’t happen.”

But there many more ways in Canada to save money. Savings websites, ordering coupons or printing them at home, newspaper flyers, tear-pads inside grocery stores, joining a coupon train or network of traders, loyalty programs, smartphone apps, price matching and the Scanner Code of Practice to which most chain stores subscribe.

The code was developed as a way for stores to self-govern their commitment to  accuracy in an era without individual price tags. If the scanned price of an item is higher than price shown on the shelf, the customer is entitled to receive the item free, up to a $10 maximum.

“(It) is a well-kept secret,” says Clement. “People who use it, use it a lot, but stores are obviously not very forthcoming about it.”

Clement’s seminar is Sept. 30 at 6:30 p.m. at the Concession Street library. Registration is required; call 905-546-3415.

Extreme couponing

Community Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Kirsty Clement has some tips that can help you knock a bundle off your weekly grocery bill.

Using websites, smartphone apps and store policies, you can save upwards of 30 per cent off your bill, she says.

“There are all kinds of tricks and tips beyond just using coupons,” she says.

Clement, who will be giving a seminar Sept. 30 on what could be called extreme couponing, says she usually saves 30-50 per cent on her family’s bill. Some weeks it can be as high as 70 per cent.

Her ability to save came somewhat out of necessity after deciding to become a stay-at-home mom.

“I’ve always approached saving money a bit like a competitive sport,” says Clement, a Dundas resident.

“It sort of runs in the family — my mom is the same way.

“Certainly having two kids to feed on more or less a one-income family made saving money even more of a priority.”

You’ll never get paid to buy a product or save 95 per cent on your bill by using coupons like you see on U.S. TV shows, she says. It’s just not possible in Canada.

“You have to mitigate your expectations somewhat if you are a fan of the American show because there are things in the States (such as stacking coupons) that just don’t occur in Canada,” says Clement.

“You’re not going to get $600 worth of groceries for $10 in Canada. It just won’t happen.”

But there many more ways in Canada to save money. Savings websites, ordering coupons or printing them at home, newspaper flyers, tear-pads inside grocery stores, joining a coupon train or network of traders, loyalty programs, smartphone apps, price matching and the Scanner Code of Practice to which most chain stores subscribe.

The code was developed as a way for stores to self-govern their commitment to  accuracy in an era without individual price tags. If the scanned price of an item is higher than price shown on the shelf, the customer is entitled to receive the item free, up to a $10 maximum.

“(It) is a well-kept secret,” says Clement. “People who use it, use it a lot, but stores are obviously not very forthcoming about it.”

Clement’s seminar is Sept. 30 at 6:30 p.m. at the Concession Street library. Registration is required; call 905-546-3415.

Extreme couponing

Community Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Kirsty Clement has some tips that can help you knock a bundle off your weekly grocery bill.

Using websites, smartphone apps and store policies, you can save upwards of 30 per cent off your bill, she says.

“There are all kinds of tricks and tips beyond just using coupons,” she says.

Clement, who will be giving a seminar Sept. 30 on what could be called extreme couponing, says she usually saves 30-50 per cent on her family’s bill. Some weeks it can be as high as 70 per cent.

Her ability to save came somewhat out of necessity after deciding to become a stay-at-home mom.

“I’ve always approached saving money a bit like a competitive sport,” says Clement, a Dundas resident.

“It sort of runs in the family — my mom is the same way.

“Certainly having two kids to feed on more or less a one-income family made saving money even more of a priority.”

You’ll never get paid to buy a product or save 95 per cent on your bill by using coupons like you see on U.S. TV shows, she says. It’s just not possible in Canada.

“You have to mitigate your expectations somewhat if you are a fan of the American show because there are things in the States (such as stacking coupons) that just don’t occur in Canada,” says Clement.

“You’re not going to get $600 worth of groceries for $10 in Canada. It just won’t happen.”

But there many more ways in Canada to save money. Savings websites, ordering coupons or printing them at home, newspaper flyers, tear-pads inside grocery stores, joining a coupon train or network of traders, loyalty programs, smartphone apps, price matching and the Scanner Code of Practice to which most chain stores subscribe.

The code was developed as a way for stores to self-govern their commitment to  accuracy in an era without individual price tags. If the scanned price of an item is higher than price shown on the shelf, the customer is entitled to receive the item free, up to a $10 maximum.

“(It) is a well-kept secret,” says Clement. “People who use it, use it a lot, but stores are obviously not very forthcoming about it.”

Clement’s seminar is Sept. 30 at 6:30 p.m. at the Concession Street library. Registration is required; call 905-546-3415.