Cutting through darkness

Community Sep 02, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Kimberly Ryan wants grieving parents to know there truly is hope.

After her adult son died in 2009, she didn’t know where to turn. For a year, she had to deal with the pain pretty much alone.

The next year, however, she found Bereaved Families of Ontario Hamilton/Burlington and took part in one of the programs it offers. Being able to find other parents who could speak openly about their thoughts, feelings and behaviours changed her outlook for the better.

“It gave me hope in knowing that I wasn’t alone and I probably would survive it,” says Ryan.

Bereaved Families of Ontario Hamilton/Burlington (BFOHB) has been helping people deal with grief since 1988. It is offering four support programs this fall.

The first one is for moms who have lost a child 18 years or younger, starting  Sept. 16 at Smith’s Funeral Home in Burlington.

One for moms who have lost an adult child, and another for couples who have lost a child, begin Sept. 18 and take place at BFOHB’s Hamilton office at 293 Wellington St. North, across from Hamilton General Hospital.

A perinatal program is offered starting Sept. 18 at Smith’s Funeral Home in Stoney Creek.

The programs are once a week from 7-9 p.m. and run for 10 to 12 weeks.

Katie Frankum was 27 weeks into her first pregnancy when the baby’s heart stopped.

Instead of preparing their home for Brody’s arrival, Frankum and her husband were dealing with unimaginable grief.

“We were really lost,” says Frankum. “This was new for our family; nothing had really gone wrong for anyone else.”

She found out through a social worker about the perinatal program offered by BFOHB.

“The first night, we realized we aren’t the only ones going through this,” she says. “I seriously thought I was crazy because of the way I was feeling.”

But day by day, she saw other parents who lost a child were able to go outside, return to work and slowly get back to their normal routine — and she knew she could, too.

“It really changed my life.”

Frankum trained as a facilitator as a way to give back in Brody’s memory and will be working in the perinatal program that begins Sept. 18.

For more information about BFOHB or its programs, call 905-318-0070 or see bfo-hamiltonburlington.on.ca.

Cutting through darkness

Community Sep 02, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Kimberly Ryan wants grieving parents to know there truly is hope.

After her adult son died in 2009, she didn’t know where to turn. For a year, she had to deal with the pain pretty much alone.

The next year, however, she found Bereaved Families of Ontario Hamilton/Burlington and took part in one of the programs it offers. Being able to find other parents who could speak openly about their thoughts, feelings and behaviours changed her outlook for the better.

“It gave me hope in knowing that I wasn’t alone and I probably would survive it,” says Ryan.

Bereaved Families of Ontario Hamilton/Burlington (BFOHB) has been helping people deal with grief since 1988. It is offering four support programs this fall.

The first one is for moms who have lost a child 18 years or younger, starting  Sept. 16 at Smith’s Funeral Home in Burlington.

One for moms who have lost an adult child, and another for couples who have lost a child, begin Sept. 18 and take place at BFOHB’s Hamilton office at 293 Wellington St. North, across from Hamilton General Hospital.

A perinatal program is offered starting Sept. 18 at Smith’s Funeral Home in Stoney Creek.

The programs are once a week from 7-9 p.m. and run for 10 to 12 weeks.

Katie Frankum was 27 weeks into her first pregnancy when the baby’s heart stopped.

Instead of preparing their home for Brody’s arrival, Frankum and her husband were dealing with unimaginable grief.

“We were really lost,” says Frankum. “This was new for our family; nothing had really gone wrong for anyone else.”

She found out through a social worker about the perinatal program offered by BFOHB.

“The first night, we realized we aren’t the only ones going through this,” she says. “I seriously thought I was crazy because of the way I was feeling.”

But day by day, she saw other parents who lost a child were able to go outside, return to work and slowly get back to their normal routine — and she knew she could, too.

“It really changed my life.”

Frankum trained as a facilitator as a way to give back in Brody’s memory and will be working in the perinatal program that begins Sept. 18.

For more information about BFOHB or its programs, call 905-318-0070 or see bfo-hamiltonburlington.on.ca.

Cutting through darkness

Community Sep 02, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Kimberly Ryan wants grieving parents to know there truly is hope.

After her adult son died in 2009, she didn’t know where to turn. For a year, she had to deal with the pain pretty much alone.

The next year, however, she found Bereaved Families of Ontario Hamilton/Burlington and took part in one of the programs it offers. Being able to find other parents who could speak openly about their thoughts, feelings and behaviours changed her outlook for the better.

“It gave me hope in knowing that I wasn’t alone and I probably would survive it,” says Ryan.

Bereaved Families of Ontario Hamilton/Burlington (BFOHB) has been helping people deal with grief since 1988. It is offering four support programs this fall.

The first one is for moms who have lost a child 18 years or younger, starting  Sept. 16 at Smith’s Funeral Home in Burlington.

One for moms who have lost an adult child, and another for couples who have lost a child, begin Sept. 18 and take place at BFOHB’s Hamilton office at 293 Wellington St. North, across from Hamilton General Hospital.

A perinatal program is offered starting Sept. 18 at Smith’s Funeral Home in Stoney Creek.

The programs are once a week from 7-9 p.m. and run for 10 to 12 weeks.

Katie Frankum was 27 weeks into her first pregnancy when the baby’s heart stopped.

Instead of preparing their home for Brody’s arrival, Frankum and her husband were dealing with unimaginable grief.

“We were really lost,” says Frankum. “This was new for our family; nothing had really gone wrong for anyone else.”

She found out through a social worker about the perinatal program offered by BFOHB.

“The first night, we realized we aren’t the only ones going through this,” she says. “I seriously thought I was crazy because of the way I was feeling.”

But day by day, she saw other parents who lost a child were able to go outside, return to work and slowly get back to their normal routine — and she knew she could, too.

“It really changed my life.”

Frankum trained as a facilitator as a way to give back in Brody’s memory and will be working in the perinatal program that begins Sept. 18.

For more information about BFOHB or its programs, call 905-318-0070 or see bfo-hamiltonburlington.on.ca.