Local cadet, marksman off to Imperial Meeting

Community Jun 03, 2014 Stoney Creek News

Anthony La Sala takes aim at international competition in Bisley, England

By Laura Lennie, News Staff

Anthony La Sala hopes to make his mark at the international shooting level this summer.

The 17-year-old Stoney Creek native and 2379 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps. master warrant officer will be competing in large bore marksmanship shooting at the Imperial Meeting next month in Bisley, England with the Royal Canadian Army Cadet National Rifle Team.

La Sala said competing at the event has been his goal for the last four years.

“It’s pretty amazing to know that I have achieved my goal. If it wasn’t for the (Army) Cadet Program, I would have never been doing this,” he said. “The team itself is like a family. It would be cool to go alone, but the fact that I’m going with friends I have made over the past three summers makes it even better.”

La Sala said cadets in large bore generally fire a 7.62mm round.

“Ranges vary from 300 to 1,000 yards and for the veterans, it’s as far as 1,200 yards,” he said. “We are not allowed to use any form of bipod or rest for our rifle, so we use special jackets, slings and other equipment that has been set up to support the rifle. We are also not allowed to use anything like scopes or anything else that can magnify (a target).”

La Sala said he became interested in shooting during his second year of cadets.

“I got to participate in a special marksmanship course for my summer training,” he said. “That experience really got me into shooting.”

The Army Cadet Program offers courses at the Connaught National Army Cadet Summer Training Centre (CNACSTC) in Ottawa.

La Sala’s road to being named to the national rifle team began three summers ago.

He participated in a basic marksmanship course at the CNACSTC. The three-week course teaches cadets the basic fundamentals of shooting using air rifles.

La Sala’s training continued after he returned from Ottawa.

His commanding officer's son, Steve Sari, who was a member of the 1996 national rifle team, took La Sala under his wing and trained him during the year. Sari also helped train La Sala’s close friend Tommy Moeller.

La Sala and Moeller then took part in the fullbore phase one course the following summer at the CNACSTC. The six-week course teaches cadets how to properly and safely use a C11 target model rifle. They are also required to participate in mini competitions and are evaluated on skill.

La Sala and Moeller were among 36 cadets out of 100 from across Canada invited back to participate in the fullbore phase two course last summer. The seven-week course sees cadets upgrade to a C12 target model rifle. They focus on enhancing their acquired skills with the ultimate goal of being named to the 18-member national rifle team.

Members of the national rifle team were announced during a ceremony on the last day of the course.

La Sala said it was one of the “most stressful” ceremonies he had ever been a part of.

“They called Tommy up and right after that, they called me up. When I was beside Tommy, he nudged my arm and whispered, ‘We did it,’” he said. “The feeling I got when he said that was something I will never forget. It was the final thing that made it official, the realization that all the hard work had paid off and now we would both be on the team.”

Members of the national rifle team will meet later this month at the CNACSTC, where they will take part in final practices.

The team will depart on June 27 from the Ottawa Macdonald–Cartier International Airport and start their journey to the Imperial Meeting in Bisley.

La Sala said the competition will feature hundreds of individuals of all ages from around the world.

“Our goal isn’t to actually win the whole competition because we are nowhere near as good as most of the others competing, which is fine, considering that most of them have been shooting twice as long as we have been alive,” he said. “The main goal that we do have is to beat the British cadet rifle team. For the past few years, we have lost, but this year’s team is looking strong, so hopefully we will win back the bragging rights.”

La Sala said he’s excited about not only competing, but also hanging out with members of the team.

“I’m looking forward to spending time with some of the best friends I’ve ever made and we will get to shoot at the same time; sounds like a dream vacation to me,” he said. “I’m just hoping to do the best that I can and do the best job possible representing the junior shooters of Canada.”

 

Local cadet, marksman off to Imperial Meeting

Community Jun 03, 2014 Stoney Creek News

Anthony La Sala takes aim at international competition in Bisley, England

By Laura Lennie, News Staff

Anthony La Sala hopes to make his mark at the international shooting level this summer.

The 17-year-old Stoney Creek native and 2379 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps. master warrant officer will be competing in large bore marksmanship shooting at the Imperial Meeting next month in Bisley, England with the Royal Canadian Army Cadet National Rifle Team.

La Sala said competing at the event has been his goal for the last four years.

“It’s pretty amazing to know that I have achieved my goal. If it wasn’t for the (Army) Cadet Program, I would have never been doing this,” he said. “The team itself is like a family. It would be cool to go alone, but the fact that I’m going with friends I have made over the past three summers makes it even better.”

La Sala said cadets in large bore generally fire a 7.62mm round.

“Ranges vary from 300 to 1,000 yards and for the veterans, it’s as far as 1,200 yards,” he said. “We are not allowed to use any form of bipod or rest for our rifle, so we use special jackets, slings and other equipment that has been set up to support the rifle. We are also not allowed to use anything like scopes or anything else that can magnify (a target).”

La Sala said he became interested in shooting during his second year of cadets.

“I got to participate in a special marksmanship course for my summer training,” he said. “That experience really got me into shooting.”

The Army Cadet Program offers courses at the Connaught National Army Cadet Summer Training Centre (CNACSTC) in Ottawa.

La Sala’s road to being named to the national rifle team began three summers ago.

He participated in a basic marksmanship course at the CNACSTC. The three-week course teaches cadets the basic fundamentals of shooting using air rifles.

La Sala’s training continued after he returned from Ottawa.

His commanding officer's son, Steve Sari, who was a member of the 1996 national rifle team, took La Sala under his wing and trained him during the year. Sari also helped train La Sala’s close friend Tommy Moeller.

La Sala and Moeller then took part in the fullbore phase one course the following summer at the CNACSTC. The six-week course teaches cadets how to properly and safely use a C11 target model rifle. They are also required to participate in mini competitions and are evaluated on skill.

La Sala and Moeller were among 36 cadets out of 100 from across Canada invited back to participate in the fullbore phase two course last summer. The seven-week course sees cadets upgrade to a C12 target model rifle. They focus on enhancing their acquired skills with the ultimate goal of being named to the 18-member national rifle team.

Members of the national rifle team were announced during a ceremony on the last day of the course.

La Sala said it was one of the “most stressful” ceremonies he had ever been a part of.

“They called Tommy up and right after that, they called me up. When I was beside Tommy, he nudged my arm and whispered, ‘We did it,’” he said. “The feeling I got when he said that was something I will never forget. It was the final thing that made it official, the realization that all the hard work had paid off and now we would both be on the team.”

Members of the national rifle team will meet later this month at the CNACSTC, where they will take part in final practices.

The team will depart on June 27 from the Ottawa Macdonald–Cartier International Airport and start their journey to the Imperial Meeting in Bisley.

La Sala said the competition will feature hundreds of individuals of all ages from around the world.

“Our goal isn’t to actually win the whole competition because we are nowhere near as good as most of the others competing, which is fine, considering that most of them have been shooting twice as long as we have been alive,” he said. “The main goal that we do have is to beat the British cadet rifle team. For the past few years, we have lost, but this year’s team is looking strong, so hopefully we will win back the bragging rights.”

La Sala said he’s excited about not only competing, but also hanging out with members of the team.

“I’m looking forward to spending time with some of the best friends I’ve ever made and we will get to shoot at the same time; sounds like a dream vacation to me,” he said. “I’m just hoping to do the best that I can and do the best job possible representing the junior shooters of Canada.”

 

Local cadet, marksman off to Imperial Meeting

Community Jun 03, 2014 Stoney Creek News

Anthony La Sala takes aim at international competition in Bisley, England

By Laura Lennie, News Staff

Anthony La Sala hopes to make his mark at the international shooting level this summer.

The 17-year-old Stoney Creek native and 2379 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps. master warrant officer will be competing in large bore marksmanship shooting at the Imperial Meeting next month in Bisley, England with the Royal Canadian Army Cadet National Rifle Team.

La Sala said competing at the event has been his goal for the last four years.

“It’s pretty amazing to know that I have achieved my goal. If it wasn’t for the (Army) Cadet Program, I would have never been doing this,” he said. “The team itself is like a family. It would be cool to go alone, but the fact that I’m going with friends I have made over the past three summers makes it even better.”

La Sala said cadets in large bore generally fire a 7.62mm round.

“Ranges vary from 300 to 1,000 yards and for the veterans, it’s as far as 1,200 yards,” he said. “We are not allowed to use any form of bipod or rest for our rifle, so we use special jackets, slings and other equipment that has been set up to support the rifle. We are also not allowed to use anything like scopes or anything else that can magnify (a target).”

La Sala said he became interested in shooting during his second year of cadets.

“I got to participate in a special marksmanship course for my summer training,” he said. “That experience really got me into shooting.”

The Army Cadet Program offers courses at the Connaught National Army Cadet Summer Training Centre (CNACSTC) in Ottawa.

La Sala’s road to being named to the national rifle team began three summers ago.

He participated in a basic marksmanship course at the CNACSTC. The three-week course teaches cadets the basic fundamentals of shooting using air rifles.

La Sala’s training continued after he returned from Ottawa.

His commanding officer's son, Steve Sari, who was a member of the 1996 national rifle team, took La Sala under his wing and trained him during the year. Sari also helped train La Sala’s close friend Tommy Moeller.

La Sala and Moeller then took part in the fullbore phase one course the following summer at the CNACSTC. The six-week course teaches cadets how to properly and safely use a C11 target model rifle. They are also required to participate in mini competitions and are evaluated on skill.

La Sala and Moeller were among 36 cadets out of 100 from across Canada invited back to participate in the fullbore phase two course last summer. The seven-week course sees cadets upgrade to a C12 target model rifle. They focus on enhancing their acquired skills with the ultimate goal of being named to the 18-member national rifle team.

Members of the national rifle team were announced during a ceremony on the last day of the course.

La Sala said it was one of the “most stressful” ceremonies he had ever been a part of.

“They called Tommy up and right after that, they called me up. When I was beside Tommy, he nudged my arm and whispered, ‘We did it,’” he said. “The feeling I got when he said that was something I will never forget. It was the final thing that made it official, the realization that all the hard work had paid off and now we would both be on the team.”

Members of the national rifle team will meet later this month at the CNACSTC, where they will take part in final practices.

The team will depart on June 27 from the Ottawa Macdonald–Cartier International Airport and start their journey to the Imperial Meeting in Bisley.

La Sala said the competition will feature hundreds of individuals of all ages from around the world.

“Our goal isn’t to actually win the whole competition because we are nowhere near as good as most of the others competing, which is fine, considering that most of them have been shooting twice as long as we have been alive,” he said. “The main goal that we do have is to beat the British cadet rifle team. For the past few years, we have lost, but this year’s team is looking strong, so hopefully we will win back the bragging rights.”

La Sala said he’s excited about not only competing, but also hanging out with members of the team.

“I’m looking forward to spending time with some of the best friends I’ve ever made and we will get to shoot at the same time; sounds like a dream vacation to me,” he said. “I’m just hoping to do the best that I can and do the best job possible representing the junior shooters of Canada.”