Painted barn quilt commemorates Battle of Stoney Creek

Community Apr 10, 2013 Stoney Creek News

Unveiling takes place April 20

By Betty Petis, Special to the news

When Battlefield House Museum and Park curator Susan Ramsay invited the Women’s Art Association of Hamilton to create a barn quilt in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Stoney Creek, association members felt honoured.

Barn quilts are large colourful wooden panels often of traditional quilt block designs, painted in exterior latex paint on special outdoor plywood. They are typically mounted on heritage barns and are intended to tell a story, act as tourist attractions and as a tribute to domestic art.

The proposed image for the barn quilt was of the British and American flags. The barn quilt would be mounted on a heritage barn in Battlefield Park and its purpose would be to educate the public on the conflict that took place on the site 200 years ago by depicting the flags of the two nations involved. The two flags symbolize the 200 years of peace between Canada and the United States.

The quilt would measure eight feet by eight feet. Having the Women’s Art Association of Hamilton participate in the project would give the organization the opportunity to become involved in the bicentennial commemoration. One hundred years ago, Sara Calder, the founding president of both the Women’s Art Association and Women’s Wentworth Historical Society – the organization that opened Battlefield House as a museum – helped to honour the memory of those men who died in the Battle of Stoney Creek by officially opening the 100-foot-tall Battlefield Monument. We wished to carry on Calder’s legacy of remembrance and the barn quilt was one way of accomplishing that goal.

It was a lengthy search for a location to do the project. Ward 10 councillor Maria Pearson assisted to eventually find us a place at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Recreation Centre in the craft room. The difficulty was finding somewhere large enough to house the project. We were allowed three days a week to work in the bright, secure location. Betty Petis, Rejeanne Sardo, Ida Ferrelli, Robbin Pulver-Andrews and Natalie Gerasimchuk took up the challenge.

It was by far the most challenging piece of art that these women had ever tackled, especially because of the perspectives, size and proportions. They started Nov. 19 and completed the final touch ups Feb. 4. It took a combined 115 hours to complete the project. We delivered. It proved to be a great opportunity to share ideas and apply our varied talents and we are very pleased with the results.

The Women’s Art Association of Hamilton will unveil the barn quilt during a ceremony on Saturday, April 20 at noon at Stoney Creek United Church, 1 King St. W. The Stoney Creek Quilter’s Guild also will unveil their bicentennial quilt at the ceremony.

 

Painted barn quilt commemorates Battle of Stoney Creek

Community Apr 10, 2013 Stoney Creek News

Unveiling takes place April 20

By Betty Petis, Special to the news

When Battlefield House Museum and Park curator Susan Ramsay invited the Women’s Art Association of Hamilton to create a barn quilt in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Stoney Creek, association members felt honoured.

Barn quilts are large colourful wooden panels often of traditional quilt block designs, painted in exterior latex paint on special outdoor plywood. They are typically mounted on heritage barns and are intended to tell a story, act as tourist attractions and as a tribute to domestic art.

The proposed image for the barn quilt was of the British and American flags. The barn quilt would be mounted on a heritage barn in Battlefield Park and its purpose would be to educate the public on the conflict that took place on the site 200 years ago by depicting the flags of the two nations involved. The two flags symbolize the 200 years of peace between Canada and the United States.

The quilt would measure eight feet by eight feet. Having the Women’s Art Association of Hamilton participate in the project would give the organization the opportunity to become involved in the bicentennial commemoration. One hundred years ago, Sara Calder, the founding president of both the Women’s Art Association and Women’s Wentworth Historical Society – the organization that opened Battlefield House as a museum – helped to honour the memory of those men who died in the Battle of Stoney Creek by officially opening the 100-foot-tall Battlefield Monument. We wished to carry on Calder’s legacy of remembrance and the barn quilt was one way of accomplishing that goal.

It was a lengthy search for a location to do the project. Ward 10 councillor Maria Pearson assisted to eventually find us a place at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Recreation Centre in the craft room. The difficulty was finding somewhere large enough to house the project. We were allowed three days a week to work in the bright, secure location. Betty Petis, Rejeanne Sardo, Ida Ferrelli, Robbin Pulver-Andrews and Natalie Gerasimchuk took up the challenge.

It was by far the most challenging piece of art that these women had ever tackled, especially because of the perspectives, size and proportions. They started Nov. 19 and completed the final touch ups Feb. 4. It took a combined 115 hours to complete the project. We delivered. It proved to be a great opportunity to share ideas and apply our varied talents and we are very pleased with the results.

The Women’s Art Association of Hamilton will unveil the barn quilt during a ceremony on Saturday, April 20 at noon at Stoney Creek United Church, 1 King St. W. The Stoney Creek Quilter’s Guild also will unveil their bicentennial quilt at the ceremony.

 

Painted barn quilt commemorates Battle of Stoney Creek

Community Apr 10, 2013 Stoney Creek News

Unveiling takes place April 20

By Betty Petis, Special to the news

When Battlefield House Museum and Park curator Susan Ramsay invited the Women’s Art Association of Hamilton to create a barn quilt in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Stoney Creek, association members felt honoured.

Barn quilts are large colourful wooden panels often of traditional quilt block designs, painted in exterior latex paint on special outdoor plywood. They are typically mounted on heritage barns and are intended to tell a story, act as tourist attractions and as a tribute to domestic art.

The proposed image for the barn quilt was of the British and American flags. The barn quilt would be mounted on a heritage barn in Battlefield Park and its purpose would be to educate the public on the conflict that took place on the site 200 years ago by depicting the flags of the two nations involved. The two flags symbolize the 200 years of peace between Canada and the United States.

The quilt would measure eight feet by eight feet. Having the Women’s Art Association of Hamilton participate in the project would give the organization the opportunity to become involved in the bicentennial commemoration. One hundred years ago, Sara Calder, the founding president of both the Women’s Art Association and Women’s Wentworth Historical Society – the organization that opened Battlefield House as a museum – helped to honour the memory of those men who died in the Battle of Stoney Creek by officially opening the 100-foot-tall Battlefield Monument. We wished to carry on Calder’s legacy of remembrance and the barn quilt was one way of accomplishing that goal.

It was a lengthy search for a location to do the project. Ward 10 councillor Maria Pearson assisted to eventually find us a place at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Recreation Centre in the craft room. The difficulty was finding somewhere large enough to house the project. We were allowed three days a week to work in the bright, secure location. Betty Petis, Rejeanne Sardo, Ida Ferrelli, Robbin Pulver-Andrews and Natalie Gerasimchuk took up the challenge.

It was by far the most challenging piece of art that these women had ever tackled, especially because of the perspectives, size and proportions. They started Nov. 19 and completed the final touch ups Feb. 4. It took a combined 115 hours to complete the project. We delivered. It proved to be a great opportunity to share ideas and apply our varied talents and we are very pleased with the results.

The Women’s Art Association of Hamilton will unveil the barn quilt during a ceremony on Saturday, April 20 at noon at Stoney Creek United Church, 1 King St. W. The Stoney Creek Quilter’s Guild also will unveil their bicentennial quilt at the ceremony.