Looking forward to being a father

Community Sep 04, 2009 Ancaster News

I guess it’s time to let the cat out of the bag by telling you all this week that there’s a bun in the oven.

My darling wife and I will receive our first child just before, on, or just after Christmas.

I can’t tell you how excited I am, despite the fact my family and friends keep trying to drag me down from my high with comments such as:

“Your life will never be the same” or “get ready for sleepless nights” or “you won’t be golfing much next year.”

Honestly, I’ve never wanted anything more in my life, so the introspective suggestions from people on how things will change dramatically once the little one arrives are moot points.

The fact conception took place is a load off my mind. When I was 12 years old, I had an incident that had the potential to render me impotent if not for the heavy-duty jeans I was wearing that fateful day.

I was riding on the back of a buddy’s dirt bike when we hit a jump. My hands were positioned on the rail just behind the seat. As we floated through the air, I became dislodged from the seat and landed right on the back tire – one leg on either side. The vital appendages took the brunt of the spinning, knobby tire.

When I finally let go, the pain was so intense I couldn’t even cry.

I lifted myself off the ground, pulled off my helmet and looked between my legs.

My jeans were ripped open. I could barely breathe.

I never went to the hospital. I was so embarrassed at what happened. For two weeks I walked around very gingerly, careful not to let any injured part bang against the side of my legs.

For years, I wondered if this incident ruined any chance that I would be able to have children.

And until I got married just this past February, I was unable to test the equipment to see if it was still functioning properly.

My 29-years of uncertainty since that unfortunate dirt bike accident was resolved with news this past spring that Susan was pregnant. Either it was through my participation, or we’re talking about immaculate conception.

As this is our first child, my wife and I have decided to make the gender a birthday surprise.

Girl, boy, I just hope, like every other expectant parent, for a healthy child.

We’ve been working on picking names for the yet-to-be-born baby Cripps. And lots of people have come forward with predictions as to the model of child we will have.

I know my father is secretly hoping for a boy to carry on the Cripps name.

My sister thinks it’s a girl.

A colleague of mine who has never met my wife predicted a girl, late on Dec. 25.

I should probably start a pool just to give everyone a chance to make his or her own prediction.

My wife works at Brantford General and has a colleague who has predicted the gender of 21 straight babies. She thinks it’s a boy.

There’s also been a lot of people chiming in about whether it’s better to have a baby born in December or January.

Either way, I couldn’t be more excited about the next few months. Having a child has been my dream, my goal, my biggest desire.

Many aspects of life vie for time, energy and passion. Career is always one of the biggest drains on our emotion. For me, putting everything else aside, being a father has been my life-long goal.

I’m just glad that knobby dirt-bike tire didn’t end my chances.

Looking forward to being a father

Community Sep 04, 2009 Ancaster News

I guess it’s time to let the cat out of the bag by telling you all this week that there’s a bun in the oven.

My darling wife and I will receive our first child just before, on, or just after Christmas.

I can’t tell you how excited I am, despite the fact my family and friends keep trying to drag me down from my high with comments such as:

“Your life will never be the same” or “get ready for sleepless nights” or “you won’t be golfing much next year.”

Honestly, I’ve never wanted anything more in my life, so the introspective suggestions from people on how things will change dramatically once the little one arrives are moot points.

The fact conception took place is a load off my mind. When I was 12 years old, I had an incident that had the potential to render me impotent if not for the heavy-duty jeans I was wearing that fateful day.

I was riding on the back of a buddy’s dirt bike when we hit a jump. My hands were positioned on the rail just behind the seat. As we floated through the air, I became dislodged from the seat and landed right on the back tire – one leg on either side. The vital appendages took the brunt of the spinning, knobby tire.

When I finally let go, the pain was so intense I couldn’t even cry.

I lifted myself off the ground, pulled off my helmet and looked between my legs.

My jeans were ripped open. I could barely breathe.

I never went to the hospital. I was so embarrassed at what happened. For two weeks I walked around very gingerly, careful not to let any injured part bang against the side of my legs.

For years, I wondered if this incident ruined any chance that I would be able to have children.

And until I got married just this past February, I was unable to test the equipment to see if it was still functioning properly.

My 29-years of uncertainty since that unfortunate dirt bike accident was resolved with news this past spring that Susan was pregnant. Either it was through my participation, or we’re talking about immaculate conception.

As this is our first child, my wife and I have decided to make the gender a birthday surprise.

Girl, boy, I just hope, like every other expectant parent, for a healthy child.

We’ve been working on picking names for the yet-to-be-born baby Cripps. And lots of people have come forward with predictions as to the model of child we will have.

I know my father is secretly hoping for a boy to carry on the Cripps name.

My sister thinks it’s a girl.

A colleague of mine who has never met my wife predicted a girl, late on Dec. 25.

I should probably start a pool just to give everyone a chance to make his or her own prediction.

My wife works at Brantford General and has a colleague who has predicted the gender of 21 straight babies. She thinks it’s a boy.

There’s also been a lot of people chiming in about whether it’s better to have a baby born in December or January.

Either way, I couldn’t be more excited about the next few months. Having a child has been my dream, my goal, my biggest desire.

Many aspects of life vie for time, energy and passion. Career is always one of the biggest drains on our emotion. For me, putting everything else aside, being a father has been my life-long goal.

I’m just glad that knobby dirt-bike tire didn’t end my chances.

Looking forward to being a father

Community Sep 04, 2009 Ancaster News

I guess it’s time to let the cat out of the bag by telling you all this week that there’s a bun in the oven.

My darling wife and I will receive our first child just before, on, or just after Christmas.

I can’t tell you how excited I am, despite the fact my family and friends keep trying to drag me down from my high with comments such as:

“Your life will never be the same” or “get ready for sleepless nights” or “you won’t be golfing much next year.”

Honestly, I’ve never wanted anything more in my life, so the introspective suggestions from people on how things will change dramatically once the little one arrives are moot points.

The fact conception took place is a load off my mind. When I was 12 years old, I had an incident that had the potential to render me impotent if not for the heavy-duty jeans I was wearing that fateful day.

I was riding on the back of a buddy’s dirt bike when we hit a jump. My hands were positioned on the rail just behind the seat. As we floated through the air, I became dislodged from the seat and landed right on the back tire – one leg on either side. The vital appendages took the brunt of the spinning, knobby tire.

When I finally let go, the pain was so intense I couldn’t even cry.

I lifted myself off the ground, pulled off my helmet and looked between my legs.

My jeans were ripped open. I could barely breathe.

I never went to the hospital. I was so embarrassed at what happened. For two weeks I walked around very gingerly, careful not to let any injured part bang against the side of my legs.

For years, I wondered if this incident ruined any chance that I would be able to have children.

And until I got married just this past February, I was unable to test the equipment to see if it was still functioning properly.

My 29-years of uncertainty since that unfortunate dirt bike accident was resolved with news this past spring that Susan was pregnant. Either it was through my participation, or we’re talking about immaculate conception.

As this is our first child, my wife and I have decided to make the gender a birthday surprise.

Girl, boy, I just hope, like every other expectant parent, for a healthy child.

We’ve been working on picking names for the yet-to-be-born baby Cripps. And lots of people have come forward with predictions as to the model of child we will have.

I know my father is secretly hoping for a boy to carry on the Cripps name.

My sister thinks it’s a girl.

A colleague of mine who has never met my wife predicted a girl, late on Dec. 25.

I should probably start a pool just to give everyone a chance to make his or her own prediction.

My wife works at Brantford General and has a colleague who has predicted the gender of 21 straight babies. She thinks it’s a boy.

There’s also been a lot of people chiming in about whether it’s better to have a baby born in December or January.

Either way, I couldn’t be more excited about the next few months. Having a child has been my dream, my goal, my biggest desire.

Many aspects of life vie for time, energy and passion. Career is always one of the biggest drains on our emotion. For me, putting everything else aside, being a father has been my life-long goal.

I’m just glad that knobby dirt-bike tire didn’t end my chances.