Dying to go green: Local funeral home offers eco-friendly options

Community Aug 14, 2009 Ancaster News

Smith’s Funeral Homes is the first Canadian funeral business certified by the Green Burial Council. GBC is an independent, non-profit, international organization that works to ensure funeral and cemetery practices are eco-friendly and meaningful.

"Running an ecologically responsible business is important to us," said Don Smith, owner, and president of Smith’s Funeral Homes. "This certification demonstrates our strong commitment to high environmental standards while responding to the needs and wishes of the families we serve."

He said families like knowing their loved ones can be buried as they wanted to live their life.

Smith’s, which has a location on Highway 8 in Stoney Creek, uses environmentally friendly suppliers and operates in a way that minimizes the firm’s carbon footprint.

This includes supplying biodegradable caskets, which have no metal, plastics or harsh chemical finishes and offering containers for cremated remains made of 100 per cent recyclable materials.

Eliminating plastics and ferrous metals and using peg and groove systems, instead of screws and nails, cuts down on the environmental impact. Using local aspen and poplar also reduces shipping costs and carbon footprint and employs local workforce.

Every funeral Smith’s handles has a tree planted in memory of the deceased and all paper products, including register books and acknowledgement cards are 100 per cent recycled.

Staff has been trained to address consumer questions about green funeral services and options and the funeral home uses plant-based embalming fluids. This ensures workers are not working with so many chemicals.

“We will continue to go the extra mile as responsible stewards of our planet’s resources,” said Don Smith. “We’ll eventually replace the cars in our funeral fleet with hybrids or other eco-friendly options.

“Our staff is dedicated to caring for bereaved families with compassion, understanding and respect. Ensuring that the final goodbye has a minimal carbon footprint is important to many of the families we serve. Meeting this need offers a meaningful, personal and healing experience."

About 300 funeral homes are part of the Green Burial Council network, which is bringing together many companies who have been ecofriendly for years.

Dying to go green: Local funeral home offers eco-friendly options

Community Aug 14, 2009 Ancaster News

Smith’s Funeral Homes is the first Canadian funeral business certified by the Green Burial Council. GBC is an independent, non-profit, international organization that works to ensure funeral and cemetery practices are eco-friendly and meaningful.

"Running an ecologically responsible business is important to us," said Don Smith, owner, and president of Smith’s Funeral Homes. "This certification demonstrates our strong commitment to high environmental standards while responding to the needs and wishes of the families we serve."

He said families like knowing their loved ones can be buried as they wanted to live their life.

Smith’s, which has a location on Highway 8 in Stoney Creek, uses environmentally friendly suppliers and operates in a way that minimizes the firm’s carbon footprint.

This includes supplying biodegradable caskets, which have no metal, plastics or harsh chemical finishes and offering containers for cremated remains made of 100 per cent recyclable materials.

Eliminating plastics and ferrous metals and using peg and groove systems, instead of screws and nails, cuts down on the environmental impact. Using local aspen and poplar also reduces shipping costs and carbon footprint and employs local workforce.

Every funeral Smith’s handles has a tree planted in memory of the deceased and all paper products, including register books and acknowledgement cards are 100 per cent recycled.

Staff has been trained to address consumer questions about green funeral services and options and the funeral home uses plant-based embalming fluids. This ensures workers are not working with so many chemicals.

“We will continue to go the extra mile as responsible stewards of our planet’s resources,” said Don Smith. “We’ll eventually replace the cars in our funeral fleet with hybrids or other eco-friendly options.

“Our staff is dedicated to caring for bereaved families with compassion, understanding and respect. Ensuring that the final goodbye has a minimal carbon footprint is important to many of the families we serve. Meeting this need offers a meaningful, personal and healing experience."

About 300 funeral homes are part of the Green Burial Council network, which is bringing together many companies who have been ecofriendly for years.

Dying to go green: Local funeral home offers eco-friendly options

Community Aug 14, 2009 Ancaster News

Smith’s Funeral Homes is the first Canadian funeral business certified by the Green Burial Council. GBC is an independent, non-profit, international organization that works to ensure funeral and cemetery practices are eco-friendly and meaningful.

"Running an ecologically responsible business is important to us," said Don Smith, owner, and president of Smith’s Funeral Homes. "This certification demonstrates our strong commitment to high environmental standards while responding to the needs and wishes of the families we serve."

He said families like knowing their loved ones can be buried as they wanted to live their life.

Smith’s, which has a location on Highway 8 in Stoney Creek, uses environmentally friendly suppliers and operates in a way that minimizes the firm’s carbon footprint.

This includes supplying biodegradable caskets, which have no metal, plastics or harsh chemical finishes and offering containers for cremated remains made of 100 per cent recyclable materials.

Eliminating plastics and ferrous metals and using peg and groove systems, instead of screws and nails, cuts down on the environmental impact. Using local aspen and poplar also reduces shipping costs and carbon footprint and employs local workforce.

Every funeral Smith’s handles has a tree planted in memory of the deceased and all paper products, including register books and acknowledgement cards are 100 per cent recycled.

Staff has been trained to address consumer questions about green funeral services and options and the funeral home uses plant-based embalming fluids. This ensures workers are not working with so many chemicals.

“We will continue to go the extra mile as responsible stewards of our planet’s resources,” said Don Smith. “We’ll eventually replace the cars in our funeral fleet with hybrids or other eco-friendly options.

“Our staff is dedicated to caring for bereaved families with compassion, understanding and respect. Ensuring that the final goodbye has a minimal carbon footprint is important to many of the families we serve. Meeting this need offers a meaningful, personal and healing experience."

About 300 funeral homes are part of the Green Burial Council network, which is bringing together many companies who have been ecofriendly for years.