Dundas' St. Joseph's Villa will get 60 new transitional care beds

Community Oct 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Dundas Star News

Dundas’ St. Joseph’s Villa is expected to offer up to 60 new transitional care beds as part of the Ontario’s government’s plan to create 200 new beds across the province to ease the pressure on hospitals.

“It is a very exciting day for us here,” said John Woods, president of St. Joseph’s Villa. “This new reactivation centre will create more transitional care in Hamilton so people can be closer to their families sooner. This will help to end hallway medicine.”

Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said during the virtual announcement Oct. 15, accompanied by Flamborough-Glanbrook Progressive Conservative MPP Donna Skelly, there will be five reactivation care centres established across the province, including in Kingston, Newmarket, Sudbury and Toronto. The 200 beds are in addition to the previously announced 128 transition beds for the Branson Site Reactivation Care Centre in Toronto, where construction has already started toward a scheduled opening early next year.

The projects are part of Ontario’s $27-billion investment over 10 years that had been previously announced to construct new and expanded hospital infrastructure, said Elliott.

“These new reactivation care centres will support patients and their families as they transition out of hospital and into the next stage of their recovery,”’ said Elliott.

St. Joseph’s Villa is collaborating with St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and Hamilton Health Sciences to renovate the eastern tower of the long-term-care facility to accommodate the 60 beds.

Construction on the project isn’t expected to be completed until 2021-22, said Elliott.

“It is not going to be for this round of COVID-19,” Elliott confirmed. “I wish I could say they would be available tomorrow.”

Woods said the villa is working with provincial health ministry officials to “fast track” the project.

“We’ve still got to do it in a safe and responsible way (and) get it up as quickly as we can,” said Woods, estimating the project could be as much as 18 months away. “We don’t have all the processes in place.”

Dr. Thomas Stewart, CEO and president of the St. Joseph's Health System, said the expansion will build upon St. Joe's commitment to high-quality, integrated care by working with other sectors of the health-care system.

"This new reactivation centre will create more care spaces in Hamilton so patients can heal and return home sooner, which will contribute to ending hallway health care," said Stewart in a news release.

St. Joseph’s Villa is already preparing to build the 10-bed Margaret’s Place Hospice and outreach centre at its Governor’s Road at Ogilvie Street campus at a cost of about $13 million. The province is providing $1.2 million in capital funding, with the rest being donated by the community. The province is expected to provide about 60 per cent of the facility’s operational costs.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: When we heard about the province's plans to expand transitional care beds at St. Joseph's Villa, we wanted to find out how the initiative would improve patient care and reduce hallway medicine.

Dundas' St. Joseph's Villa to have up to 60 new transitional care beds

Community Oct 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Dundas Star News

Dundas’ St. Joseph’s Villa is expected to offer up to 60 new transitional care beds as part of the Ontario’s government’s plan to create 200 new beds across the province to ease the pressure on hospitals.

“It is a very exciting day for us here,” said John Woods, president of St. Joseph’s Villa. “This new reactivation centre will create more transitional care in Hamilton so people can be closer to their families sooner. This will help to end hallway medicine.”

Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said during the virtual announcement Oct. 15, accompanied by Flamborough-Glanbrook Progressive Conservative MPP Donna Skelly, there will be five reactivation care centres established across the province, including in Kingston, Newmarket, Sudbury and Toronto. The 200 beds are in addition to the previously announced 128 transition beds for the Branson Site Reactivation Care Centre in Toronto, where construction has already started toward a scheduled opening early next year.

The projects are part of Ontario’s $27-billion investment over 10 years that had been previously announced to construct new and expanded hospital infrastructure, said Elliott.

“These new reactivation care centres will support patients and their families as they transition out of hospital and into the next stage of their recovery." — Christine Elliott.

“These new reactivation care centres will support patients and their families as they transition out of hospital and into the next stage of their recovery,”’ said Elliott.

St. Joseph’s Villa is collaborating with St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and Hamilton Health Sciences to renovate the eastern tower of the long-term-care facility to accommodate the 60 beds.

Construction on the project isn’t expected to be completed until 2021-22, said Elliott.

“It is not going to be for this round of COVID-19,” Elliott confirmed. “I wish I could say they would be available tomorrow.”

Woods said the villa is working with provincial health ministry officials to “fast track” the project.

“We’ve still got to do it in a safe and responsible way (and) get it up as quickly as we can,” said Woods, estimating the project could be as much as 18 months away. “We don’t have all the processes in place.”

Dr. Thomas Stewart, CEO and president of the St. Joseph's Health System, said the expansion will build upon St. Joe's commitment to high-quality, integrated care by working with other sectors of the health-care system.

"This new reactivation centre will create more care spaces in Hamilton so patients can heal and return home sooner, which will contribute to ending hallway health care," said Stewart in a news release.

St. Joseph’s Villa is already preparing to build the 10-bed Margaret’s Place Hospice and outreach centre at its Governor’s Road at Ogilvie Street campus at a cost of about $13 million. The province is providing $1.2 million in capital funding, with the rest being donated by the community. The province is expected to provide about 60 per cent of the facility’s operational costs.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: When we heard about the province's plans to expand transitional care beds at St. Joseph's Villa, we wanted to find out how the initiative would improve patient care and reduce hallway medicine.

Dundas' St. Joseph's Villa to have up to 60 new transitional care beds

Community Oct 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Dundas Star News

Dundas’ St. Joseph’s Villa is expected to offer up to 60 new transitional care beds as part of the Ontario’s government’s plan to create 200 new beds across the province to ease the pressure on hospitals.

“It is a very exciting day for us here,” said John Woods, president of St. Joseph’s Villa. “This new reactivation centre will create more transitional care in Hamilton so people can be closer to their families sooner. This will help to end hallway medicine.”

Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said during the virtual announcement Oct. 15, accompanied by Flamborough-Glanbrook Progressive Conservative MPP Donna Skelly, there will be five reactivation care centres established across the province, including in Kingston, Newmarket, Sudbury and Toronto. The 200 beds are in addition to the previously announced 128 transition beds for the Branson Site Reactivation Care Centre in Toronto, where construction has already started toward a scheduled opening early next year.

The projects are part of Ontario’s $27-billion investment over 10 years that had been previously announced to construct new and expanded hospital infrastructure, said Elliott.

“These new reactivation care centres will support patients and their families as they transition out of hospital and into the next stage of their recovery." — Christine Elliott.

“These new reactivation care centres will support patients and their families as they transition out of hospital and into the next stage of their recovery,”’ said Elliott.

St. Joseph’s Villa is collaborating with St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and Hamilton Health Sciences to renovate the eastern tower of the long-term-care facility to accommodate the 60 beds.

Construction on the project isn’t expected to be completed until 2021-22, said Elliott.

“It is not going to be for this round of COVID-19,” Elliott confirmed. “I wish I could say they would be available tomorrow.”

Woods said the villa is working with provincial health ministry officials to “fast track” the project.

“We’ve still got to do it in a safe and responsible way (and) get it up as quickly as we can,” said Woods, estimating the project could be as much as 18 months away. “We don’t have all the processes in place.”

Dr. Thomas Stewart, CEO and president of the St. Joseph's Health System, said the expansion will build upon St. Joe's commitment to high-quality, integrated care by working with other sectors of the health-care system.

"This new reactivation centre will create more care spaces in Hamilton so patients can heal and return home sooner, which will contribute to ending hallway health care," said Stewart in a news release.

St. Joseph’s Villa is already preparing to build the 10-bed Margaret’s Place Hospice and outreach centre at its Governor’s Road at Ogilvie Street campus at a cost of about $13 million. The province is providing $1.2 million in capital funding, with the rest being donated by the community. The province is expected to provide about 60 per cent of the facility’s operational costs.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: When we heard about the province's plans to expand transitional care beds at St. Joseph's Villa, we wanted to find out how the initiative would improve patient care and reduce hallway medicine.